Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for iliveinmyimagination > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by iliveinmyimagi...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 8,750,887
Helpful Votes: 71

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
"iliveinmyimagination"

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
On Beauty
On Beauty
by Zadie Smith
Edition: Hardcover

15 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Drivel, 27 Oct. 2005
This review is from: On Beauty (Hardcover)
I am at a loss to explain the rave reviews this book has recieved or its place on the Booker shortlist. It is flat and bland and stuffed with constructed stereotypes. The language was empty and dialogue heavy. There is no satisfaction in reading a book such as this, no matter how trendy the writer is at this current moment.
This isnt literature, try Marquez or Orwell for that. Actual story tellers with a gift for writing effortlessly, and books that leave you reeling, but satisfied, not wondering why you wasted good time on such drivel.


The Poisonwood Bible
The Poisonwood Bible
by Barbara Kingsolver
Edition: Paperback

23 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dilluted story, 23 Sept. 2005
This review is from: The Poisonwood Bible (Paperback)
I struggle to describe this book. It has received so many good reviews and yet I find it difficult to agree with the admiration. It has an interesting story and is told from the viewpoint of 5 different women and details their loss of respect for their father and their survival in turbulent times.

It is far too long, several chapters at the end were unnecessary and there were far too many rambling tangents in many chapters. If this book had been distilled down, it would have been far more intense. The bulk of the book is interesting, but it is too dilluted and the potency is lost.
Having read reviews here previously, I have also read The Mosquito Coast, which is built on a very similar premise to The Poisonwood Bible. The Mosquito Coast is intense, chilling and makes the reader question family dynamics. Its a much darker book and is all the better for it. It is everything the Poisonwood Bible strives to be. In comparison, this book just doesnt hit the mark.


The Mosquito Coast
The Mosquito Coast
by Paul Theroux
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, but often chilling, 9 Sept. 2005
This review is from: The Mosquito Coast (Paperback)
I read this book solely because I had read good reviews of it. I'm glad to say that those reviews were spot on. The Mosquito Coast poses questions on a wide range of subjects from family to modern culture. The story is intriguing and after a few chapters I found I was totally gripped.
The father is ingenious, and its difficult not to admire his creativity and intellect, but he has a very cruel streak. There are a few episodes that illustrate his callous nature towards his children in the beginning of the book, but as it proceeds, his actions and attitudes become all the more chilling. The devotion of his wife and children (especially that of Charlie) show the amazing control one person can have over others.
The last three-quarters of the book are utterly gripping, as the father's inability to accept blame for his own mistakes pushes the family into extremely difficult circumstances. From here readers are kept on a knife edge to the shocking climax.
Gripping story, effective writing, interesting characters. Read this book.


We Need To Talk About Kevin
We Need To Talk About Kevin
by Lionel Shriver
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unsettling, but the ending disappoints, 1 Aug. 2005
Reading this book unnerved me, the mother's life was so irrevocably changed by her decision to have children, she seemed to have to compromise at every turn and a live a life that was not of her choosing. As a child-less young woman, this terrified me.
The bulk of the book was fascinating with Kevin's actions becoming more and more disturbing. Yet the ending, for me, was a disappointment and changed the whole tone of the story. The 'twist' that has already been mentioned in reviews, was needless, the overkill destroyed the subtly of the story, and made the continued relationship between mother and son seem unbelievable.
The ending aside, I would reccomend this book as it is a stark and unapologetic look at difficult and fraught family relationships. It is utterly fascinating and well written, staying with the reader long after the final page is turned.


The Time Traveler's Wife
The Time Traveler's Wife
by Audrey Niffenegger
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique, 18 July 2005
I had picked up this book several times, skimmed the back cover and put it back on the shelf. A time travelling love story didnt quite appeal to me and the going backwards and forwards in time only seemed likely to confuse. I eventually bought it on a whim, and thank god I did.
The story sounds as if it would be difficult to accept, but it isn't in the slightest - time travelling with no control is presented in a realistic light, it highlghts the delicacies of time travelling - the need to find clothes and food etc and the sheer inconvenience of it all. The jumping backwards and forwards in time proves to be uncomplicated and doesnt confuse or detract from the story at hand.
The story itself is very well written and honestly told. The differences in age don't appear inappropriate, as nothing happens between Henry and Clare until she is of a suitable age. Henry's less honourable characteristics are displayed later on in the book (his penchant for flighty romances and lack of emotional ties) but this reflects the difficulty in coping with his condition.
As the story progresses into their stabilised romance, the narrative deepens and it becomes a story about a couple dealing with difficult issues. The reader finds themselves investing more and more in the book and its characters, and this makes the end almost unbearable. Even though there are signs and downright certainty of the ending before you reach it, it'll break your heart, it certainly did mine.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 12, 2010 11:37 AM GMT


The Ninth Life of Louis Drax
The Ninth Life of Louis Drax
by Liz Jensen
Edition: Paperback

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unusual and unsettling, 18 July 2005
The premise of this book piqued my interest to say the least - a boy in a coma is a most unusual storyline and offered something abit different. I found neither of the main characters particularly likeable - Louis was prone to disturbing outbursts and bitter anger, while Dr Dannachet came across as weak and often foolish. As I think of it now, there were question marks over most of the characters in some way. This was the beauty of the book, there were niggling doubts about the characters and the secret that underpined them all always seemed just a page away.
I found Louis and his imagination unsettling, but the actual story was gripping and revealed the many folded weaknesses of humanty. Although others have commented that the style of writing supposedly reflecting a nine year old wasn't quite right, I disagree. Louis was no normal child - he is often described as brilliant as well as disturbed and this provides the justification for the writing style. It reflected the personality of Louis well - often suddenly turning the banal into the unsettling.
Ultimately, it was a tragedy and I still find myself plagued by thoughts of that unusual little boy.


Page: 1