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Reviews Written by
R. G. Robson (UK)

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Verbatim 53029 500GB Store 'n' Go USB 3.0 2.5 Inch External Hard Drive - Black
Verbatim 53029 500GB Store 'n' Go USB 3.0 2.5 Inch External Hard Drive - Black
Offered by Amazin Products!
Price: £43.98

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unreliable, 5 Aug. 2012
The one thing I want a hard drive to be is reliable. It's just not worth the risk of losing data.

After only a few weeks of light usage the Verbatim's USB port has started to die, with Windows giving me constant messages "This USB device is not recognised". Maybe I can get everything transferred before it goes totally (cue sinking feeling) but even if so I doubt I'll buy another Verbatim.


The Hot Topic: How to Tackle Global Warming and Still Keep the Lights on
The Hot Topic: How to Tackle Global Warming and Still Keep the Lights on
by David King
Edition: Paperback

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lucid account of climate change science and politics, 10 Mar. 2008
Generally excellent. The only real criticism I'd make of this book is that the authors are sometimes too blunt in their opinions. They say that "human activity is to blame for the rise in temperature over recent decades", and anyone who denies this is essentially a fool or an oil shill. This is unfair: lots of perfectly bright people have been misinformed, and believe there's more uncertainty than there is - you don't need to be a fool to be duped.

Overall, 'A Rough Guide to Climate Change' gives a clearer (and more thorough) overview of the science, but Hot Topic is more up-to-date and has greater detail about the potential solutions and political obstacles. (I'd also highly recommend Andrew Dessler's more technical 'The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change'.)

Finally, it's worth noting what a tireless job David King has done in promoting awareness of climate change. History is likely to regard him very highly.


Jamo i300B - iPod Speaker System - Black
Jamo i300B - iPod Speaker System - Black

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning!, 19 Aug. 2007
After going along to my local hi-fi shop, the Jamo i300 blew everything in its price range away. The bass is easily powerful enough to make the floor shake, and vocals are immaculately clear. Virtually every other iPod player seems flimsy in comparison, even the Bose. The only one that can compare with its sound is the Klipsch iFi, but the Jamo *looks* far classier.

Friends have been amazed at how good this is, and it's the first time I've felt impressed enough to write a review of electronics goods. The only potential draw-backs are a slightly limited remote control and the weight. If you need a portable iPod player, look elsewhere. Otherwise it's stunning!


Heat: How to Stop the Planet Burning
Heat: How to Stop the Planet Burning
by George Monbiot
Edition: Hardcover

10 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cutting carbon in the UK - impassioned, razor-sharp and rational, 25 Feb. 2007
Monbiot firmly believes that we need to act as a society to change things. For example, in a competitive field it's almost impossible for a business to adopt environmental measures that even slightly raise prices -they'll be put out of business by competitors. But if all businesses were in the same position, each could continue to innovate, and maximize profits within the new framework.

To achieve this, Monbiot's core proposal is to introduce carbon rationing. The allowance is fairly generous at first, tightening as we approach the 2050 deadline. The book then discusses ways we could meet the limits while minimizing the impact on our standard of living. Housing, transport and energy generation are all examined for possible savings.

Some of the proposals might seem difficult, but the truth is we're currently not doing anywhere near enough to make a real difference. The only reason the UK is on course for Kyoto is the move from coal to gas power plants - we've made almost no impact on CO2 elsewhere.

Heat isn't the first book I'd recommend to someone unsure about global warming. Field Notes from a Catastrophe (by Elizabeth Kolbert) is brilliantly readable, and probably a better place to start. The Rough Guide to Climate Change gives a thorough, concise and balanced overview of the science. But as the starting point for a debate about how the UK can seriously act to avoid disaster, Heat is unbeatable.


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