Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for CW > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by CW
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,924,108
Helpful Votes: 10

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
CW

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Judge Dredd: Dark Justice
Judge Dredd: Dark Justice
by John Wagner
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.48

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful artwork - non-existent story, 1 Sept. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
What a disapointment! I'm always sceptical about dark judge stories, which are very one note (as Wagner himself admits) but I was looking forward to this as an epic send-off for some iconic characters. However it's short, uneventful, and it doesn't really feel like the end of the dark judges anyway. All the cliches are present (you cannot kill what does not live etc...) and it amounts to less than the sum of its parts. The only thing preventing the rating being way lower is the artwork, which is absolutely stunning. This is clearly a labour of love for Staples, and he produces some of the best looking comic book art that I have ever seen. What a shame that's it's at the service of such a one dimensional tale. The dark judges really need to stay in their box unless the writers can think of something for them to actually do, aside from showing up and killing a bunch of people just for the sake of it. John Wagner is a legend but his heart didn't really seem in this, and his initial instinct to leave judge death alone was the right one - after the excellent trifecta this is a big, beautiful and slightly boring let down


You Can't Read This Book: Censorship in an Age of Freedom
You Can't Read This Book: Censorship in an Age of Freedom
by Nick Cohen
Edition: Paperback

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most important book of 2012, 20 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book must confirm Nick Cohen as one of the greatest left wing writers currently writing in the English language. Not only is the book's core theme absolutely central to a host of contemporary debates, but his writing style is witty, intellegent and engageing.

Cohen casts a wide net in his analysis of modern censorship, tackling the extremist religious right, quack therapists, high finance, the law and much else. Despite this varied and lively discussion the book never strays into digression or navel gazing, instead keeping a tight focus on the very serious practical consequences of prohibiting speech and infantalising free citizens. Cohen is fair minded, and acknowledges the often good intentions behind some calls for speech restrictions, in the name of social harmony and anti-discrimination, however he concludes that the truth is too important to sacrifice at the alter of 'respect'. Moreover, by refusing to engage with our opponents we actually do them a dissevice, by treating them like petulant children who cannot handle an adult argument, as well as denying them alternative viewpoints which they may actually appreciate. He also examines the darker, violent and coercive side of censorship and is magnificently scathing about the parochial cowards in the media and entertainment who, while posing as speakers of truth to power, are never in any real danger, and refuse to speak truth to anybody who might be in a position to actually put them in harms way.

Also of note is his dissection of English libel law, the operation of which is nothing short of a national embarrassment.

The book is the most powerful modern argument in favour of free speech that I have read, containing chilling examples of supression and intimidation but also a spiriting call for free inquiry, adult debate and resistence to tyrants great and small who think that they know what you should think. An essential read.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 17, 2013 4:43 PM GMT


Tory Wars: The Conservatives in Crisis
Tory Wars: The Conservatives in Crisis
by Simon Walters
Edition: Hardcover

2.0 out of 5 stars repetative and bland - a bit like the tories themselves!, 14 Aug. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having read Andrew Rawnsley's engaging history of New Labour, 'The End of the Party', I set about looking for something similar on the Conservatives. Alas this was not it. Its not exactly a bad book, just thoroughly unremarkable, reading almost like a textbook than political journalism. The facts are all there, events are chronicled but its passionless and shallow. For example a major theme of the book is the tension between the modernisers, spearheaded by Michael Portillo, and Thatcherite traditionalists. But there is no great insight given into the substance of these different factions, what they believed and why. We just know that they existed and that the tensions between them caused headaches for the leadership.

As well as lacking depth it also reads poorly, and the very basic writing style sucks any drama out of the interpersonal tension between the main players. Whereas Rawnsley's vivid writing brings colour and detail to the events depicted, Walter's style renders events distinctly grey. It also feels repetitive and the urge to skip over several paragraphs of text begins to creep over the reader surprisingly early on - never a good sign.

With hindsight the author appears to have made the wrong call - the stance taken is hostile to the modernisers, and lays disproportionate blame at their door for the election defeat as well as for the chaotic state of the party. While tension at the top of the party cannot have helped, and Portillo's personal ambition and the behaviour of his disciples may have been disruptive, the subsequent history of the party probaby shows that an unreconstucted Thatcherite stance combined with stolid social conservatism was not going to get the party re-elected. In other words the modernisers were probably right, a fact that this book fails to acknowledge due to its partisan nature and undisguised personal hostility towards Michael Portillo and his followers.

In summary this is a book that is strictly for beginners - anyone who is vaugely familiar with the travails of the tories under Hague should skip it, and I doubt i'll be re-reading it. Far better is Tim Vale's 'The Conservative Party from Thatcher to Cameron', which is more thorough, more neutral and far better written.


The Conservative Party: From Thatcher to Cameron
The Conservative Party: From Thatcher to Cameron
by Tim Bale
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £55.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars this is a great history - and thats not a moot point!, 14 Aug. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Whether or not this is the best history of the Tory party is a moot point. It is certainly detailed, and more importantly it doesn't simply concern itself with the personalities at the top of the party, instead considering the ideological, organisational and historical constraints which acted upon senior conservatives. Fortunately this detailed analysis does not render the book dry and academic - to the contrary the author's literary skill manages to convey the dynamism and drama present within the party throughout their wilderness years and, in spite of the odd paragraph of opinion poll data dumping, the narrative flows rather well. Whilst it is hardly the Tory equivalent of Andrew Rawnsley's New Labour books, which are so well written, they're hard to put down, it is most certainly a cut above your average political analysis.

Although as a left winger I found the chapter on the Duncan-Smith years hilarious, the author himself is admirably non-partisan, and there is much to learn here for Labour and Tory supporters alike - in fact it is an excellent read for anybody who takes an interest in British political history. I just wish he'd stop using the phrase 'moot point' so much!


Page: 1