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Ian Cook (MK, UK)
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Austerity Britain, 1945-1951 (Tales of a New Jerusalem)
Austerity Britain, 1945-1951 (Tales of a New Jerusalem)
by David Kynaston
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.08

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Post War Britain, 17 Feb. 2011
This is a well written book that paints an evocative picture of the lives lived in Britain as the Second World War ended. It gives a real feel for the continuing suffering that rationing brought, when people felt the end of the war should see better days. Beware though, you will feel yourself being drawn to read 'just a bit more' and go to bed much later than you intended! Overall I like it and feel that it gives a connection to my parents in their young days of danger and austerity. These are things we cannot easily imagine these days. One note of warning though; when Kynaston talks of policing at the time he refers to a police 'service', a title which has only recently been applied to what was then (more properly) a police 'force'. He also refers, more than once when mentioning crime, the 'moral panic' that is beloved of the Left when attempting to dismiss rising crime as all in the mind. It is interesting to note also, as a Labour government took power, that it was much plainer then that this party consisted of Socialists and those who wanted socialist principles applied to a democratic style of government. Labour are more careful to hide the Marxist leanings these days. So, it is relevant to today, giving context to much that has occurred since and forming as it does a series, much more is yet to be discovered.


The Rotten State of Britain: How Gordon Lost a Decade and Cost a Fortune
The Rotten State of Britain: How Gordon Lost a Decade and Cost a Fortune
by Eamonn Butler
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Who left him in charge?, 17 Feb. 2011
An excellent book really, on an important subject. We know historically that every time a Labour administration leaves office, it leaves a mess and the 'New Labour' of Blair and Brown did spectacularly well in that respect. Brown proved that he is fantastically incompetent with money and he was either Chancellor or Prime Minister. Clearly a country with no standards. The author captures here the madness of this regime and the destruction it wrought. It isn't comprehensive of course, it would take a multi-volume set to achieve that but the essence is there. What is less impressive is the writing style which lacks flair, though it is always readable. Most annoying though, not least in this technological age is the sheer volume of spelling and compositional errors in the book, starting on the publishers page 'this edition first published in by' and culminating in the sentence; '..and of course for sounds much more pro-active than of.' The author gets 8 out of ten, the publisher 1.


The Chilling Stars: A New Theory of Climate Change
The Chilling Stars: A New Theory of Climate Change
by Henrik Svensmark
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Climate Is Changing!, 8 July 2008
Ever thought that maybe, just maybe the climate might not stay exactly as it is today? Ever thought that because you were told about ice ages at school that climate change happens? Ever thought that scientific pronouncements should be evidence based? If the answer to the latter is 'no' then you are probably an environmentalist, so this book will not interest you. If you want to know something and want it proven then you are ahead of our (current) Royal Society, as they would doubtless want to burn this book. The sun and water vapour are the main agents in our climate. Certainly not Man. And that is a fact; carbon emissions are not and never have (natural or human -which now counts as unnatural) been a main agent of change in our climate. Despite Al Gore believing he is possessed of an infallable dogma, the inconvenient fact is that recent cooling and increased emissions breaks his unassailable link. This book gives a possible explanation of what is happening to our planet's weather. It suggests, it doesn't shout. It looks for proof. How refreshing is that?
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 20, 2009 1:22 PM BST


Scared to Death: From BSE to Global Warming: Why Scares are Costing Us the Earth
Scared to Death: From BSE to Global Warming: Why Scares are Costing Us the Earth
by Christopher Booker
Edition: Hardcover

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Trump, 8 July 2008
Brilliant. This is the most direct antidote to the self-important piffle peddled by Al Gore. It is a book that asks it's readers to do an old fashioned, British thing; think for yourself. It tells you about things that are presented by government and others as facts, but are anything but. It also includes the scandalous story of the government poisoning farmers and then covering it up. A real scare rather than a manufactured one. Time after time we are told to be afraid merely to support some political agenda, Booker and North lift the lid a little on the cockroaches.


I Fought The Law - Laws Are Made To Be Broken - Aren't They?
I Fought The Law - Laws Are Made To Be Broken - Aren't They?
by Dan Kieran
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quirky, 8 July 2008
You should definitely read this book, it is an essential slice of the madness that is Britain today. But when I had finished it I felt a little underwhelmed, a little unsure, as if it somehow didn't fully explain something. Odd, but there you go.


Londonistan: How Britain is Creating a Terror State within
Londonistan: How Britain is Creating a Terror State within
by Melanie Phillips
Edition: Hardcover

66 of 89 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Read and think, 20 Feb. 2007
On the whole extremely readable, but don't just nod in agreement. Understand her argument and see where she may be wrong or overstate. For instance, I agree that the blind support of Left Liberals for Palestinian terrorism whilst at the same time denouncing the Middle East's only democracy has done terrible harm. But on this point Melanie does rather go on. Generally though, it shows how Bush's 'War on Terror' needs to seen for what he intended, a war on the ideas that seek to destroy our way of life, rather than one of marching armies. And that it is the Left predominately that wants to endlessly posture and preen, to blame Bush for everything without addressing the real enemy in our midst. Is Islam a terror for us all? No, but as Melanie points out forcefully, by deploying crass indifference to those Muslims that do wish us harm, we terribly let down those that don't and we ultimately put ourselves in harms way.


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