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Normandy Battlefield Guide (Normandy, FRANCE)

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Britain and France in Two World Wars
Britain and France in Two World Wars
by Robert Tombs
Edition: Paperback
Price: £23.39

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars An embarrasment to academia, 24 Nov. 2016
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I bought this book as I am myself currently studying, at post graduate level, the way that the different belligerent nations assess and reflect on the Battle of Normandy fought in 1944. I saw that there was a chapter within this edition entitled the 'British and the Liberation of France', authored by a French History Professor. You would think that such an author, contributing to such a volume would have a basic grasp of the history he is attempting to analyse. This clearly isn't the close in this this example with the author pretty much endorsing every myth ever created whilst at the same time distorting history to the extent that Saving Private Ryan becomes as credible as a historical source as this book does.

It would be funny if not so scary that a prominent figure is academia can state in one chapter 'The evidence is unambiguous: the memory of the D-Day landings has gradually been Americanized at the expense of the British... It is now up to the historian to piece together the true extent of the British contribution' (page 138), only then for the author to quote, amongst many other misinformed passages, that after the 'continued failures of the British to take Caen and to breakout of their sector 'the Americans took over operations around Caen' (page142).

EPIC FAIL - in fact an embarrassment to academia, what the hell were Robert Tombs and Emile Chabal thinking in allowing such rubbish to be put into print.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 4, 2017 4:25 PM BST


Force Mulberry: The Planning and Installation of the Artificial Harbor off U.S. Normandy Beaches in World War II
Force Mulberry: The Planning and Installation of the Artificial Harbor off U.S. Normandy Beaches in World War II
by Alfred Stanford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.05

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Shameless American Propaganda, 29 Jun. 2016
Just another example of American propaganda.

Why did the Mulberry Harbour work in the British sector when built by the Royal Engineers and didn't work in the US Sector when built by the Americans?

Simply put, it was built correctly in the British sector with components anchored to the seabed whilst the Americans wanting the glory of having their harbour operational before the Brits cut corners. Not ever being able to come to terms with the facts, this is simply a blatant attempt, an ever present all too common blatant attempt, by the Americans to shift the blame of incompetence onto the shoulders of the nearest foreigner.

Shameless, just shameless.


Decision in Normandy: The Real Story of Montgomery and the Allied Campaign
Decision in Normandy: The Real Story of Montgomery and the Allied Campaign
by Carlo d'Este
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate study of American chauvinism., 29 Mar. 2015
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D'Este becomes the ultimate apologist for the less than spectacular performance of the American forces on the battlefields of Normandy by manufacturing a scapegoat by switching the blame of the apparent stalemate from those who laboured against the minority with the majority to the forces who faced, and defeated, not just the bulk of the German forces in Normandy but pretty much their entire elite. D'Este's argument can be be refuted through the lifting of just a few paragraphs from the memoirs of the Officer Commanding American forces in Normandy, in the words of General Omar Bradley...

While Collins was hoisting his VII Corps flag over Cherbourg, Montgomery was spending his reputation in a bitter siege against the old university city of Caen. For three weeks he had rammed his troops against those panzer divisions he had deliberately drawn towards that city as part of our Allied strategy of diversion in the Normandy Campaign. Although Caen contained an important road junction that Montgomery would eventually need, for the moment the capture of that city was only incidental to his mission. For Monty’s primary task was to attract German troops to the British front that we might more easily secure Cherbourg and get into position for the breakout.

In this diversionary mission Monty was more than successful, for the harder he hammered towards Caen, the more German troops he drew into that sector. Too many correspondents, however, had overrated the importance of Caen itself, and when Monty failed to take it, they blamed him for the delay. But had we attempted to exonerate Montgomery by explaining how successfully he had hoodwinked the German by diverting him toward Caen from the Cotentin, we would have also given our strategy away. We desperately wanted the German to believe this attack on Caen was the main Allied effort.

But while this diversion of Monty’s was brilliantly achieved, he never the less left himself open to criticism by overemphasizing the importance of his thrust toward Caen. Had he limited himself simply to the containment without making Caen a symbol of it, he would have been credited with success instead of being charged, as he was, with failure at Caen. For Monty’s success should have been measured in the panzer divisions the enemy rushed against him whilst Collins sped on toward Cherbourg. Instead, the Allied newspaper readers clammered for a place name called Caen which Monty had once promised but failed to win for them

The containment mission that had been assigned Monty in the OVERLORD plan was not calculated to burnish British pride in the accomplishments of their troops. For in the minds of most people, success in battle is measured in the rate and length of advance. They found it difficult to realise that the more successful Monty was in stirring up German resistance, the less likely he was to advance. For another four weeks it fell to the British to pin down superior enemy forces in that sector while we maneuvered into position for the US breakout. With the Allied world crying for blitzkrieg the first week after we landed, the British endured their passive role with patience and forbearing


The Dead and Those about to Die: D-Day: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach
The Dead and Those about to Die: D-Day: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach
by John C. McManus
Edition: Hardcover

3.0 out of 5 stars For a much better all round alternative try Joe Balkoski's 'Omaha Beach', 15 Mar. 2015
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Another book following in the American tradition of telling a story without verification or substantiation. I am absolutely flabbergasted that a so-called Professor of History can write such a book, quoting from hundreds of different accounts and records, without sourcing a single one of them. Having said that, the story, and without substantiation it could only ever be a story and therefore never be classed as a credible addition to the history of Omaha Beach, it reads very well although as previous reviewers have stated many parts of the book feel repetitive and spurious. For a much better all round alternative try Joe Balkoski's 'Omaha Beach'.


The Cover up at Omaha Beach: The Cover-up at Omaha Beach, Maisy Battery and the US Rangers
The Cover up at Omaha Beach: The Cover-up at Omaha Beach, Maisy Battery and the US Rangers
Price: £0.99

1 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Shameful in its attempt to belittle one of history's greatest raids. Don't miss the sequel when the author ..., 24 Oct. 2014
Manipulated history manufactured to attract commercial revenue to the author's attraction. Shameful in its attempt to belittle one of history's greatest raids.

Don't miss the sequel when the author will explain how the Maisy Battery sunk the Titanic.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 18, 2015 7:25 PM BST


The Day Of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy 1943-44 (Liberation Trilogy)
The Day Of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy 1943-44 (Liberation Trilogy)
by Rick Atkinson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.48

7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ugly American, 10 Aug. 2013
Biased and subjective with very little historical worth.

If you want to believe that America won the war all by themselves and that the American soldier was the only effective soldier to fight amongst the allies, the only decent Generals were American and really the sun does actually shine out of the ass of General Mark Clark then go ahead and buy this book.

If you are interested in history I would suggest you look elsewhere.

And just when I thought we'd got rid of Ambrose here comes another one who never lets the truth get in the way of a story!


D-Day: D-Day and the Battle for Normandy
D-Day: D-Day and the Battle for Normandy
by Antony Beevor
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Regurgitation of the same old popular history - Deeply flawed and not worth the paper it is printed on., 28 Oct. 2012
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More regurgitation of the same old mis-information. Nothing more than just the perpetuation of commonly held misconceptions already proven false by 'historians', a title which can not be applied to Mr Beevor, at least not on this evidence. Beevor has sold 4 million books, most of these books in America. He knows what an ill-informed American public wish to hear and he'll serve it up on a plate for them before counting the earnings of mass sales to the biggest audience - popular history it may be, accurate it aint!
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 14, 2012 7:42 AM GMT


GI Ingenuity: Improvisation, Technology, and Winning World War II -- Stackpole Military History Series (Stackpole Military History): Improvisation, Technology and Winning WWII
GI Ingenuity: Improvisation, Technology, and Winning World War II -- Stackpole Military History Series (Stackpole Military History): Improvisation, Technology and Winning WWII
by James Carafano
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Primary School History Project?, 16 Aug. 2012
Firstly, if the author is a year 7 student striking out into the world of military history for the first time then kudos my friend this book represents a fantastic start into your writing career, a career which can only go up from here.

However, if the author has actually passed puberty then what the hell have stackpole done publishing this absolute pile of chauvinistic pigswill. The historical content could not be more off the mark. The 'author' has simply manipulated what was already historical myth to weave a tapestry of legend and folklore to present to an ultra-insecure American public a picture of the American solider in WW2 as some marvel comic book superhero.

Despite what the 'author' would have us believe, initiative and ingenuity was not an exclusively American trait in WW2. In actual fact, by the admission of Eisenhower, Bradley and co American forces were some of the most blunt and unsophisticated of all nationalities. America did not win the war alone, in fact in comparison with most other nations America's input was minimal. Anyone who wishes to beg to differ, including the 'author' really should climb out of their own rectums as soon as possible and smell the coffee because the stench of BS associated with this book is overwhelming!


If Chaos Reigns
If Chaos Reigns
by Flint Whitlock
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent summary of D-Day Airborne Ops, 26 July 2011
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This review is from: If Chaos Reigns (Hardcover)
This book is very slow to get moving and to be frank the first 80 pages; a history of the origins of airborne forces is not neccessary.

If you can survive the tedium of the first third of the book, once the story gets moving this new publication provides an excellent summary of both the US and Commonwealth airborne operations on D-Day. Drawing from a well balanced selection of sources the book does not claim to be a definitive history but none the less would be a great starting point for anyone wanting an introductory insight into some of the most remarkable operations ever mounted.

If you enjoy this and wish to go deeper into this history try searching for the work of Neil Barber, Carl Shilleto, Phil Nordyke and Mark Bando.


Normandy Crucible: The Decisive Battle That Shaped World War II in Europe
Normandy Crucible: The Decisive Battle That Shaped World War II in Europe
by John Prados
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £21.29

1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Avoid, 22 July 2011
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A poor man's Carlo d'Este.

This is poorly written, poorly researched and true to form amongst the myriad of typically subjective American authors.

John Prados should stick to war games and leave factual history alone.

As an alternative try Robin Neilland's 'The Battle for Normandy' .


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