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Steve (Norfolk)

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Price: £0.00

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad, awful, terrible, with a side order of annoying!, 2 May 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Facebook (App)
If I could give this app a minus score it would be -5!

If I try to click on any pages to read, it kicks me out and crashes!
If there are any videos on fb, I have to delete them (or try to anyways) before it kicks me out and crashes!
This app needs an update that actually works! Amazon, sort this out please?

Update 25th May 2017...

Congratulations to Amazon for not updating the app!
It's got so bad that I'm constantly kicked out of it altogether! Click on the app, scroll down for a few seconds...and then you're kicked out!
If there's a video on facebook, it kicks you out if you scroll past!
This really is a terrible, terrible app! I will update again if and when the app gets updated.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯


KINGMAS® Brown Halloween Creepy Adult Horse head latex Rubber Mask
KINGMAS® Brown Halloween Creepy Adult Horse head latex Rubber Mask

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The godfather of masks..., 11 Sept. 2016
The morning after I received this horse mask in the post, I placed it in bed next to my girlfriend similar to the godfather.
She screamed. I laughed. She broke up with me.
Now all I have is the mask.
I'm sad...
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 3, 2016 1:22 PM GMT


Morrisons Kitchen Foil, 10m
Morrisons Kitchen Foil, 10m
Price: £1.27

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for hats!, 11 Sept. 2016
I use this tin foil as a hat to stop the voices in my head from telling me to do bad things!


Inflatable Toast
Inflatable Toast

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome inflatable toast, 9 Sept. 2016
This review is from: Inflatable Toast (Toy)
As inflatable toast goes, this is one of the best inflatable toasts. The toast is easy to inflate which is handy, if you're like me and you're always in a rush, and need an inflatable toast at a moment's notice.
The only downside is that you can't wear it on your head, unlike actual toast.


Support for Back | Lumbar Back Brace | The Only Certified Medical-Grade Lower Back Belt for Pain Relief and Injury Prevention | Double Adjustment for Perfect Fit | For Men and Women | ActiveBak by Clever Yellow | 4 Sizes
Support for Back | Lumbar Back Brace | The Only Certified Medical-Grade Lower Back Belt for Pain Relief and Injury Prevention | Double Adjustment for Perfect Fit | For Men and Women | ActiveBak by Clever Yellow | 4 Sizes
Offered by Clever Yellow Ltd
Price: £39.97

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back brace, 8 Sept. 2016
There's an irony in these back support braces. If you go into a chemist, they always keep them on the bottom shelf, so you hurt your back bending down!


BIBLE CURE FOR BACK PAIN (New Bible Cure (Siloam))
BIBLE CURE FOR BACK PAIN (New Bible Cure (Siloam))
by COLBERT DONALD
Edition: Paperback

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bible cure for back pain, 8 Sept. 2016
This book is kind of ironic. Reason being is that I hurt my back after dropping the actual bible on the floor in my local waterstone's the other day. The book was so heavy, I pulled a muscle bending down trying to pick it up!
After the paramedics arrived, I saw bible cure for back pain on another shelf and thought "what the hey..."


No Man's Sky Special Edition PS4 Game
No Man's Sky Special Edition PS4 Game
Offered by Go2Games
Price: £39.99

23 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant game!, 29 Aug. 2016
No Man's Sky review

Before I start my review...

I've followed this game since its first trailer in 2013 and after playing for around 40+ hrs I can honestly say that I love this game.
For me, it's not only met, but has exceeded my expectations! It's also the kind of game that makes you ask, why do I play video games and what is it about them that I like?

No Man's Sky is an exploration/survival game at its core and a fine good one at that.

But it all boils down to one thing...

Personal opinion...

And as we all know, that is subjective.

But for many, they seem to think that their opinion is fact.
And anyone with at least some common sense knows that an opinion is just that...an opinion.

Now, onto the review...

Did you ever read a choose your own adventure book as a child?
Well that's how I see No Man's Sky...a choose your own adventure...in a universe full of possibilities.

Is this game for everyone? No, it's not.
It's definitely a marmite game and won't please everyone, but is that a bad thing? No, not at all.
But the amount of negativity aimed at No Man's Sky is puzzling.
And the hatred towards the developers is bizarre and uncalled for. So many wanted this game to fail way before release which makes you ask why?

As No Man’s Sky opens, you find yourself stranded on a planet beside a crashed, damaged ship...
It is here at your ship that you come across something that gives you a choice of which path to follow. Do you want to go exploring by yourself or do you want to accept the Atlas' guidance?

Before going anywhere, you have to explore and collect the resources required to fix your ship’s systems.
And through that simple set of obstacles, the game quickly introduces players to a predominant portion of the title’s gameplay. You collect resources to help you finally take off and reach the next planet, then rinse and repeat as you explore your way through the galaxy.

There is a simple joy to seeing what is beyond that next hill, discovering a new point of interest, or stumbling across a huge deposit of that one resource you desperately need. Many gamers likely have little interest in such things, but for those that do, No Man’s Sky pulls you in until, before you know it, you’ve strayed so far that it is a full 10-20 minute walk back to your ship.

What I also love is possibly No Man’s Sky’s defining feature, every plant and animal you come across can be analyzed, renamed, and uploaded to the online community as your personal discovery.
And with each one you upload, you receive the in-game currency, called Units.

Renaming planets, star systems, and animals silly names like Boaty McBoatface never gets old!
You really had to have been there to appreciate it.

Although only a handful of the plants I found during my travels was kind of interesting, it is the variety of animals that can catch your eye and spark the imagination.
Be they scurrying little type creatures, towering beasts or even fish and birds, the procedural generation manages a wide range of animals begging for names.
And when you discover and scan those animals 100%, you're given extra Units.

Not only animals and resources...points of interest...green question marks that appear whenever the player sends out an ever-useful scanning pulse, also dot every planet. They range from simple landmarks and save points to alien outposts, secured manufacturing facilities, abandoned buildings, and even ancient temples.

Everything you do and discover adds to that progression, and the game gives you more than enough freedom to decide what you want to focus on.

As for the story? Well, there isn't one.
Instead, the game focuses on lore instead of a single-line story. Dave Gibbons (Watchmen, Kingsman, 2000 AD) and James Swallow (Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Star Trek) contributed to the lore of the game.
The lore gives a consistent narrative and different perspectives from each of the lifeforms across the universe. It is discovered in colonial outposts, shelters (traveler's log), artifacts such as Plaque, Ruin and Monolith found throughout the game.

There's also the Stargates/Portals, but I haven't come across any of those as of yet.

With all of that exploring you do, you also collect resources, upgrade your equipment, buy (or find crashed) ships for you to fly.
And you also rack up a few of the progression-tracking Milestones.
It’s the type of progression you can find in most games nowadays.
Each planet you visit is much more than just the resources and the upgrades, it’s also your discoveries. No Man’s Sky lets you lay claim to your journey in a way few games do.

From what I've found so far, there are three different alien races in No Man’s Sky, and each one not only have their own space stations, cultures, and ships, but also their own languages.
Speaking of which, Hello Games has actually done something very cool when it comes to alien languages.
Far too often in sci-fi stories, everyone simply speaks and everyone understands that language. And if there are differences, it’s quickly translated for convenience. No Man’s Sky embraces that complexity however.

Finding ancient ruins in your travels, you can learn words for each of the strange, foreign tongues.

Interactions with the alien races then involve actual dialogue in their given language, with known words translated. Each conversation then becomes a small, but interesting, word game, requiring you to respond according to what little you understand.
Answering correctly leads to a nice reward and a higher standing with that individual race.

Through these simple but effective systems, taking the time to collect relics for trade or learn new words all ties back into progression.

And when it comes to flying from one planet to another, it’d be wrong not to talk about just how awesome it feels to actually be able to do it. Land on a planet, run around for a while and discover some animals, hop in your spaceship, take off, fly to a new planet, touch down, get out, run around some more. And all without a loading screen.
It really is enough to make any sci-fi lover’s mouth water.

There are space stations which are large alien space ports that can be landed on that serve as trading centres, refuelling stations and more. NPC starships fly in and out, giving you the chance to either trade or possibly purchase a ship.
You can even (sometimes) see the space station from a planet itself which's very cool.

Also In space, you can choose to attack freighters that may warp into the system and play aggressively, but then you have to deal with the automated, galaxy-wide security force, the sentinels.

These sentinels also protect each planet and moon that you discover, with some that will leave you to go about your business, while others may shoot you on sight!

From a technical point of view, No Man's Sky is incredibly ambitious and an amazing achievement, and the sense of scale is amazing, especially that first moment you open the star map and zoom around is overwhelming and awe-inspiring.

The closest I can compare this to is that first moment you step out of the vault or a cave in Bethesda's Fallout or Elder Scrolls games and realise that you can go anywhere and do anything.
But Hello Games managed that feeling with a fraction of the people and resources.

And let's not forget the awesome music by 65daysofstatic which's also procedurally generated and really adds to the feel of the game. The album is called "Music for an Infinite Universe".

Everything that we thought about gaming has been turned on its head with this game.
No Man’s Sky is a beautiful, open-universe survival game that makes incredible use of procedural generation in a way that turns its players into actual explorers. 

And the game is obviously a labour of love.

Plus, it's extremely addictive.

I like the fact that you’re not just discovering worlds and creatures, but also gameplay elements.
I like that the game doesn't have some big “DID YOU KNOW? – You can press the square button by an alien ship to try and purchase it!” pop-up and instead you just figure that out on your own.

For myself, and those who I've spoken to say the same thing, that it resonates with them in a way that, as a child, imagined what it would be like to explore the galaxy in their own Millennium Falcon or their very own Starship Enterprise!

But maybe that's it...maybe this game is for those who like to use their imagination...

That's not an insult to those who don't like the game. Everyone's different.
For example, some gamers like a quick fix with their games, and some like the developers to hold their hand throughout the entire time.
I've also heard of gamers who found the thought of this game boring and yet they're excited by Titanfall 2 because...well, you can shoot people...
That's fine and all, but if that's the case then maybe this game isn't for you.

----------

Some negatives...

Now as much as I love the game, it's not perfect. For myself there's some issues, like for example, it would be a nice idea if you were able to travel back to some of your favourite planets in an easy way, instead of blindingly searching through the intergalactic map and then giving up.
Then there are the caves you can find on planets. As lovely as they are, you enter a cave thinking that it's unlikely there's something there for you to find like a rare item, but just things to mine.

----------

Missing elements...

And yes there are gameplay elements that were taken out for whatever reason. So far we don't know why this happened, and everyone's coming up with their conspiracy theories from Sean Murray lied to me, to alien invasion and the illuminati's new world order.
Whatever the reason though, hopefully these (and much more) will be added at a later date.
But saying that, even if Hello Games did put all of these gameplay elements into the game that people want/expect, they'd still find something to complain about because well, you know...they're gamers.

This is the problem with gamers.
Why is it that developers like Ubisoft that has a dev team of thousands of people who put out their usual Annual Franchise Game and gamers complain "it's more of the same, why don't developers take risks anymore", but when a team of just 15 people (who started out as 4) put something together that is different,
incredibly ambitious, an amazing achievement, and obviously a labour of love, that takes a risk in pursuit of a genuine vision, people complain "But it doesn't have the things that I wanted! I want my money back!"

It's funny how it wasn't that long ago when we were playing games like space invaders and pong, and now look...
The games we have are incredibly amazing, and yet some people are still not happy.

Go figure...

----------

Hype...

The hype for this game hasn't been built by Hello Games or by Sony. The Advertising is there, but the hype has been built by an audience that this game resonates with. The idea of an entire galaxy, at your finger tips, available to explore is an incredibly enticing idea. To folks that say they haven't released enough information, haven't shown enough content, I'll say this...would you like the ending of that book you're reading spoilt? No of course not!
It's the same with with this game. No Man's Sky is an exploration game. If you're exploring, would you want your finding revealed to you before you've gone on that journey?

----------

Advertising...

I, personally, don't care what the "gaming community" thinks. This game is straight up amazing. I haven't seen one decent argument that actually supports why this is a bad game. "Oh they lied to us"
But WHY. HOW?
"Oh there's no multiplayer"
Ok? And? When did they actually even say, in a clear statement, that it had multiplayer?

Gamers have said that they've been lied to. Really? As if that's the first time we've ever been lied to about a video game.
It's not.
I personally love the game.
It appeals to my nature of living to explore and discovering new things.
The graphics are beautiful, the creatures are amazing, and the openness of the game is incredibly mind blowing!

So it doesn't have multiplayer. That doesn't mean it can't be good.
And they never said there would be multiplayer. Before the game was released, Sean Murray said that this wasn't a multiplayer game!

And even if they lied about certain elements of the game, why does that take away from what is essentially a fun and addictive game?

And as far as lying to us goes for products, do you really believe everything that you're told through advertising? Because...advertising...is a lie...

Has Lynx body wash or spray ever gotten you girls?
Has buying the woman in your life jewelry ever gotten you a yes 100% of the time?
Has eating frosted flakes made you an amazing athelete?
The list goes on and on. Yep, you got lied to by advertising. It's what they do these days.

So instead of complaining, give a credible reason why you don't like the game.

Now I'm sorry you need more explosions or more things to kill to enjoy a game, but I personally enjoy grinding to get all these credits to buy a big ship, get a big inventory and push to get to all the atlas interfaces.
And then I'm going to the center of the universe....one galaxy after another...

I feel like most people just don't even have the thought capacity to play this game because it requires you to choose your own destiny...

And to use your imagination!

You can't just go towards one goal it requires you to choose.
Give me one real reason why this game sucks.
And don't say "its boring" because that's a lame excuse!
Not enough fighting for you? I can understand that. Too open of a world? (Universe)I can understand that too.
But give a reason to not like this game for what it is other than "I was lied to about it."

The fact that this game includes..

1. Space battles.

2. Incredibly excellent upgrade system, if you ask me.

3. Literally quintillions of planets, almost all of which, at least that I've been to, have been different.

4. Diverse aliens with several made up languages that you have to learn and understand.

5. SHIPS! So many ships! So many options!

6. A ton of different multi-tools.

7. The ability to literally name your own discoveries. That is amazing.

8. ALL THE STUFF. This is a stuff collectors dream. Get blueprints and go make your stuff awesome.

9. SURVIVAL. Its totally a survival game and I can get that.

10. An intriguing Lore to the universe...No it doesn't have a story, but the lore itself is so intriguing, it's as if something big happened and you have to work out what that was.
Just try not to ignore the atlas.

11. LOTS TO DO. Explore, discover, fight, trade. This game has so much to it if you take the time to figure it all out.

I mean do I really need to keep going?

----------

Mixed reviews...

As I said earlier in the review, this game is marmite gaming and won't appeal to everyone.
The reviews this game has received are incredibly mixed from 5 to 8 out of 10.
I think that everyone should play this game if given the chance, just to form their own opinion.
The problem with many gamers is that, although reading many reviews and watching their favourite youtube gamer review this game, it's still their opinion, and not yours. I find it bizarre that some gamers watch a review and then say "well that gamer said it's rubbish so I'm not gonna buy it!"
The same can be said for those (like myself) who love the game. Don't take our word for it, go and form your own opinion.

----------

Price...

Now the price...I'm sure we've all played triple A games that were terrible. I know I have. But because they are a triple A game, they're allowed to charge full price? (I'm looking at you Destiny, and many games from Ubisoft!)
There's a mentality that if a game is from an indie studio, then the game shouldn't be charged full price.
I bought the limited edition (which by the way, is gorgeous, with an artbook, comic, ps4 theme, plus a steelbook in a lovely collectors edition box.) and I'm happy that I paid £70 for it!
I'd rather my money go to hello games than paying an absolute fortune for the likes of Destiny or Assassin's Creed.

----------

To sum up...

No Man's Sky is a labour of love, incredibly ambitious and an amazing achievement, the sense of scale is amazing and awe-inspiring.
It has its faults like all games but I personally
think No Man's Sky is absolutely brilliant.

But if you're unsure, perhaps you need to ask yourself...what kind of games do you like to play and why?

My score 5/5

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 30, 2016 6:26 PM GMT


No Man's Sky (PS4)
No Man's Sky (PS4)
Offered by Trade-N-Go Gaming
Price: £12.36

10 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant game!, 26 Aug. 2016
This review is from: No Man's Sky (PS4) (Video Game)
No Man's Sky review

Before I start my review...

I've followed this game since its first trailer in 2013 and after playing for around 40+ hrs I can honestly say that I love this game.
For me, it's not only met, but has exceeded my expectations! It's also the kind of game that makes you ask, why do I play video games and what is it about them that I like?

No Man's Sky is an exploration/survival game at its core and a fine good one at that.

But it all boils down to one thing...

Personal opinion...

And as we all know, that is subjective.

But for many, they seem to think that their opinion is fact.
And anyone with at least some common sense knows that an opinion is just that...an opinion.

Now, onto the review...

Did you ever read a choose your own adventure book as a child?
Well that's how I see No Man's Sky...a choose your own adventure...in a universe full of possibilities.

Is this game for everyone? No, it's not.
It's definitely a marmite game and won't please everyone, but is that a bad thing? No, not at all.
But the amount of negativity aimed at No Man's Sky is puzzling.
And the hatred towards the developers is bizarre and uncalled for. So many wanted this game to fail way before release which makes you ask why?

As No Man’s Sky opens, you find yourself stranded on a planet beside a crashed, damaged ship...
It is here at your ship that you come across something that gives you a choice of which path to follow. Do you want to go exploring by yourself or do you want to accept the Atlas' guidance?

Before going anywhere, you have to explore and collect the resources required to fix your ship’s systems.
And through that simple set of obstacles, the game quickly introduces players to a predominant portion of the title’s gameplay. You collect resources to help you finally take off and reach the next planet, then rinse and repeat as you explore your way through the galaxy.

There is a simple joy to seeing what is beyond that next hill, discovering a new point of interest, or stumbling across a huge deposit of that one resource you desperately need. Many gamers likely have little interest in such things, but for those that do, No Man’s Sky pulls you in until, before you know it, you’ve strayed so far that it is a full 10-20 minute walk back to your ship.

What I also love is possibly No Man’s Sky’s defining feature, every plant and animal you come across can be analyzed, renamed, and uploaded to the online community as your personal discovery.
And with each one you upload, you receive the in-game currency, called Units.

Renaming planets, star systems, and animals silly names like Boaty McBoatface never gets old!
You really had to have been there to appreciate it.

Although only a handful of the plants I found during my travels was kind of interesting, it is the variety of animals that can catch your eye and spark the imagination.
Be they scurrying little type creatures, towering beasts or even fish and birds, the procedural generation manages a wide range of animals begging for names.
And when you discover and scan those animals 100%, you're given extra Units.

Not only animals and resources...points of interest...green question marks that appear whenever the player sends out an ever-useful scanning pulse, also dot every planet. They range from simple landmarks and save points to alien outposts, secured manufacturing facilities, abandoned buildings, and even ancient temples.

Everything you do and discover adds to that progression, and the game gives you more than enough freedom to decide what you want to focus on.

As for the story? Well, there isn't one.
Instead, the game focuses on lore instead of a single-line story. Dave Gibbons (Watchmen, Kingsman, 2000 AD) and James Swallow (Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Star Trek) contributed to the lore of the game.
The lore gives a consistent narrative and different perspectives from each of the lifeforms across the universe. It is discovered in colonial outposts, shelters (traveler's log), artifacts such as Plaque, Ruin and Monolith found throughout the game.

There's also the Stargates/Portals, but I haven't come across any of those as of yet.

With all of that exploring you do, you also collect resources, upgrade your equipment, buy (or find crashed) ships for you to fly.
And you also rack up a few of the progression-tracking Milestones.
It’s the type of progression you can find in most games nowadays.
Each planet you visit is much more than just the resources and the upgrades, it’s also your discoveries. No Man’s Sky lets you lay claim to your journey in a way few games do.

From what I've found so far, there are three different alien races in No Man’s Sky, and each one not only have their own space stations, cultures, and ships, but also their own languages.
Speaking of which, Hello Games has actually done something very cool when it comes to alien languages.
Far too often in sci-fi stories, everyone simply speaks and everyone understands that language. And if there are differences, it’s quickly translated for convenience. No Man’s Sky embraces that complexity however.

Finding ancient ruins in your travels, you can learn words for each of the strange, foreign tongues.

Interactions with the alien races then involve actual dialogue in their given language, with known words translated. Each conversation then becomes a small, but interesting, word game, requiring you to respond according to what little you understand.
Answering correctly leads to a nice reward and a higher standing with that individual race.

Through these simple but effective systems, taking the time to collect relics for trade or learn new words all ties back into progression.

And when it comes to flying from one planet to another, it’d be wrong not to talk about just how awesome it feels to actually be able to do it. Land on a planet, run around for a while and discover some animals, hop in your spaceship, take off, fly to a new planet, touch down, get out, run around some more. And all without a loading screen.
It really is enough to make any sci-fi lover’s mouth water.

There are space stations which are large alien space ports that can be landed on that serve as trading centres, refuelling stations and more. NPC starships fly in and out, giving you the chance to either trade or possibly purchase a ship.
You can even (sometimes) see the space station from a planet itself which's very cool.

Also In space, you can choose to attack freighters that may warp into the system and play aggressively, but then you have to deal with the automated, galaxy-wide security force, the sentinels.

These sentinels also protect each planet and moon that you discover, with some that will leave you to go about your business, while others may shoot you on sight!

From a technical point of view, No Man's Sky is incredibly ambitious and an amazing achievement, and the sense of scale is amazing, especially that first moment you open the star map and zoom around is overwhelming and awe-inspiring.

The closest I can compare this to is that first moment you step out of the vault or a cave in Bethesda's Fallout or Elder Scrolls games and realise that you can go anywhere and do anything.
But Hello Games managed that feeling with a fraction of the people and resources.

And let's not forget the awesome music by 65daysofstatic which's also procedurally generated and really adds to the feel of the game. The album is called "Music for an Infinite Universe".

Everything that we thought about gaming has been turned on its head with this game.
No Man’s Sky is a beautiful, open-universe survival game that makes incredible use of procedural generation in a way that turns its players into actual explorers. 

And the game is obviously a labour of love.

Plus, it's extremely addictive.

I like the fact that you’re not just discovering worlds and creatures, but also gameplay elements.
I like that the game doesn't have some big “DID YOU KNOW? – You can press the square button by an alien ship to try and purchase it!” pop-up and instead you just figure that out on your own.

For myself, and those who I've spoken to say the same thing, that it resonates with them in a way that, as a child, imagined what it would be like to explore the galaxy in their own Millennium Falcon or their very own Starship Enterprise!

But maybe that's it...maybe this game is for those who like to use their imagination...

That's not an insult to those who don't like the game. Everyone's different.
For example, some gamers like a quick fix with their games, and some like the developers to hold their hand throughout the entire time.
I've also heard of gamers who found the thought of this game boring and yet they're excited by Titanfall 2 because...well, you can shoot people...
That's fine and all, but if that's the case then maybe this game isn't for you.

----------

Some negatives...
Now as much as I love the game, it's not perfect. For myself there's some issues, like for example, it would be a nice idea if you were able to travel back to some of your favourite planets in an easy way, instead of blindingly searching through the intergalactic map and then giving up.
Then there are the caves you can find on planets. As lovely as they are, you enter a cave thinking that it's unlikely there's something there for you to find like a rare item, but just things to mine.

----------

Missing elements...
And yes there are gameplay elements that were taken out for whatever reason. So far we don't know why this happened, and everyone's coming up with their conspiracy theories from Sean Murray lied to me, to alien invasion and the illuminati's new world order.
Whatever the reason though, hopefully these (and much more) will be added at a later date.
But saying that, even if Hello Games did put all of these gameplay elements into the game that people want/expect, they'd still find something to complain about because well, you know...they're gamers.

This is the problem with gamers.
Why is it that developers like Ubisoft that has a dev team of thousands of people who put out their usual Annual Franchise Game and gamers complain "it's more of the same, why don't developers take risks anymore", but when a team of just 15 people (who started out as 4) put something together that is different,
incredibly ambitious, an amazing achievement, and obviously a labour of love, that takes a risk in pursuit of a genuine vision, people complain "But it doesn't have the things that I wanted! I want my money back!"

It's funny how it wasn't that long ago when we were playing games like space invaders and pong, and now look...
The games we have are incredibly amazing, and yet some people are still not happy.

Go figure...

----------

Hype...
The hype for this game hasn't been built by Hello Games or by Sony. The Advertising is there, but the hype has been built by an audience that this game resonates with. The idea of an entire galaxy, at your finger tips, available to explore is an incredibly enticing idea. To folks that say they haven't released enough information, haven't shown enough content, I'll say this...would you like the ending of that book you're reading spoilt? No of course not!
It's the same with with this game. No Man's Sky is an exploration game. If you're exploring, would you want your finding revealed to you before you've gone on that journey?

----------

Advertising...

I, personally, don't care what the "gaming community" thinks. This game is straight up amazing. I haven't seen one decent argument that actually supports why this is a bad game. "Oh they lied to us"
But WHY. HOW?
"Oh there's no multiplayer"
Ok? And? When did they actually even say, in a clear statement, that it had multiplayer?

Gamers have said that they've been lied to. Really? As if that's the first time we've ever been lied to about a video game.
It's not.
I personally love the game.
It appeals to my nature of living to explore and discovering new things.
The graphics are beautiful, the creatures are amazing, and the openness of the game is incredibly mind blowing!

So it doesn't have multiplayer. That doesn't mean it can't be good.
And they never said there would be multiplayer. Before the game was released, Sean Murray said that this wasn't a multiplayer game!

And even if they lied about certain elements of the game, why does that take away from what is essentially a fun and addictive game?

And as far as lying to us goes for products, do you really believe everything that you're told through advertising? Because...advertising...is a lie...

Has Lynx body wash or spray ever gotten you girls?
Has buying the woman in your life jewelry ever gotten you a yes 100% of the time?
Has eating frosted flakes made you an amazing athelete?
The list goes on and on. Yep, you got lied to by advertising. It's what they do these days.

So instead of complaining, give a credible reason why you don't like the game.

Now I'm sorry you need more explosions or more things to kill to enjoy a game, but I personally enjoy grinding to get all these credits to buy a big ship, get a big inventory and push to get to all the atlas interfaces.
And then I'm going to the center of the universe....one galaxy after another...

I feel like most people just don't even have the thought capacity to play this game because it requires you to choose your own destiny...

And to use your imagination!

You can't just go towards one goal it requires you to choose.
Give me one real reason why this game sucks.
And don't say "its boring" because that's a lame excuse!
Not enough fighting for you? I can understand that. Too open of a world? (Universe)I can understand that too.
But give a reason to not like this game for what it is other than "I was lied to about it."

The fact that this game includes..

1. Space battles.

2. Incredibly excellent upgrade system, if you ask me.

3. Literally quintillions of planets, almost all of which, at least that I've been to, have been different.

4. Diverse aliens with several made up languages that you have to learn and understand.

5. SHIPS! So many ships! So many options!

6. A ton of different multi-tools.

7. The ability to literally name your own discoveries. That is amazing.

8. ALL THE STUFF. This is a stuff collectors dream. Get blueprints and go make your stuff awesome.

9. SURVIVAL. Its totally a survival game and I can get that.

10. An intriguing Lore to the universe...No it doesn't have a story, but the lore itself is so intriguing, it's as if something big happened and you have to work out what that was.
Just try not to ignore the atlas.

11. LOTS TO DO. Explore, discover, fight, trade. This game has so much to it if you take the time to figure it all out.

I mean do I really need to keep going?

----------

Mixed reviews...
As I said earlier in the review, this game is marmite gaming and won't appeal to everyone.
The reviews this game has received are incredibly mixed from 5 to 8 out of 10.
I think that everyone should play this game if given the chance, just to form their own opinion.
The problem with many gamers is that, although reading many reviews and watching their favourite youtube gamer review this game, it's still their opinion, and not yours. I find it bizarre that some gamers watch a review and then say "well that gamer said it's rubbish so I'm not gonna buy it!"
The same can be said for those (like myself) who love the game. Don't take our word for it, go and form your own opinion.

----------

Price...
Now the price...I'm sure we've all played triple A games that were terrible. I know I have. But because they are a triple A game, they're allowed to charge full price? (I'm looking at you Destiny, and many games from Ubisoft!)
There's a mentality that if a game is from an indie studio, then the game shouldn't be charged full price.
I bought the limited edition (which by the way, is gorgeous, with an artbook, comic, ps4 theme, plus a steelbook in a lovely collectors edition box.) and I'm happy that I paid £70 for it!
I'd rather my money go to hello games than paying an absolute fortune for the likes of Destiny or Assassin's Creed.

----------

To sum up...
No Man's Sky is a labour of love, incredibly ambitious and an amazing achievement, the sense of scale is amazing and awe-inspiring.
It has its faults like all games but I personally
think No Man's Sky is absolutely brilliant.

But if you're unsure, perhaps you need to ask yourself...what kind of games do you like to play and why?

My score 5/5

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 29, 2016 2:49 PM BST


7 Days to Die (PS4)
7 Days to Die (PS4)
Price: £24.99

43 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars 7 Days to Die...7 Days to Load...7 seconds to Delete..., 15 July 2016
This review is from: 7 Days to Die (PS4) (Video Game)
The apocalypse...the very word conjures up images of a world full of zombies, world war 3, cats and dogs living together, bugs and glitches and...Oh wait...

7 Days to Die is as if DayZ and Minecraft had a love child.

This zombie-themed survival game with its emphasis on crafting has a lot of great ideas, but everything about the way they’re presented here makes it very difficult to recommend.

You start (or wake up) buck naked, apart from something that protects your modesty, and a note from someone named 'Noah' telling you how the wasteland is an unforgiving place.

And he'd be right...

So, with no clothes, no resources, and no clue where to to go or what to do, you press forward into a game that gives you have one simple goal...survive for as long as you can.

Dunn...Dunn...Dunnnn!!

Before you jump into the game, you are presented with numerous options to customize your experience. From a selection of characters to choose from to how threatening the zombies are.

You also have the choice on whether you want to play in a procedurally-generated environment or a pre-constructed map.

The crafting is very deep, with a staggering amount of items that you can create by either trial and error or by crafting recipes found around the world that detail more complex items like guns.
However, as you need to craft components for certain items, it gets more complex. Some will require numerous different materials to craft, and with many of these found via random drops and dumb luck, it turns what could have been a fun pastime into what feels like a real slog.

And when you’re not crafting, you’ll be fighting off the undead, along with the occasional crazed dog (which incidentally, sounds like a Tie-Fighter when it dies) or an angry grizzly bear.  
The problem though is that the combat is incredibly clunky. You swing wildly like a madman at enemies and, if you’re really lucky, the damn thing will die.
Most of the melee weapons are pretty useless and it’s actually easier to kill zombies with your bare hands (or better yet, with harsh language) than with a stone club.
You generally fare better if you can make yourself a gun, but they’re one of the more harder items to craft, so they take a long while to cobble together and ultimately don’t feel worth the effort.

The skills are quite in depth and very impressive, similar to a Bethesda game.

The enemy AI is absolutely ruthless.
Zombies are everywhere at night, forcing you to take shelter in your safe house.
However, despite your best efforts, even if you turn out all the lights, get rid of all the meat that you may have that can attract them, and keep really still and quiet, the little buggers will still be hammering down your door faster than you can say "Avon calling".
Especially after every 7 days (hence the name) in which a horde of zombies come banging on your door with so much determination that you would think they were trying to sell you the latest issue of the watchtower magazine.
But thankfully, all they want is to feast upon your delicious brain meats.

You also need to think of the weather, as snow and rain will give you hypothermia if you stay out in it too long and if you’re not wearing appropriate clothing.
Alternatively, you need to start shedding layers so that you don’t become dehydrated.
Trying to figure out why both your stamina and health is deteriorating whilst zombies are trying to get a hug from you is frustrating.

Like most of the mechanics in the game, it has a lot of potential. Unfortunately, the weather is incredibly changeable, which results in you spending way too much time rearranging your outfit in the game’s poorly-optimized and difficult to navigate inventory.
Why on earth do I have to use the thumbsticks like a mouse pointer in order to select things in the menus? 

And no, it's not a good looking game either. It's genuinely ugly in a ps2 era kind of way.
If you look at some of the pictures that are (apparently) from the ps4 version, they look colourful and vibrant. You'll find that they're actually from the pc because no way is the game that nice to look at.

It's very bizarre when your character becomes hungry and the type of noises you hear are worse than those coming from the zombies themselves. Honestly, a lot of the time it sounded like my character was having sex with his weird groans he was making!

It's not much fun trying to find somewhere you can call home, only to die whether at the hands of a zombie, or the weather.
After your character dies, you drop your backpack, and if you haven't laid a bedroll somewhere to start back at, you can be anywhere on the map. This is an issue, because you go back out to search for your backpack which has everything you collected so far, only to die again...

And then there's the glitches and bugs.
When it was released, there was freezing and glitches everywhere. At one point it took me 7 times to load a game because it kept crashing! And that was both single and multiplayer!
After 2 patches (as of this writing) some of these bugs have been fixed.

Not all mind...

Like for example, the way a deer was able to get into a house even though the door was closed, and how did that rabbit get its head stuck in the side of the refrigerator??
Oh and there are the air-drops that happen every 24hrs. It was interesting hearing the plane fly over and yet there was nothing in the sky. Few seconds later, there it was, flying overhead.
But like many others, I so wanted to like this game and was willing to overlook the graphics and bugs due to it being surprisingly addictive. But you can only put up with these problems for so long.

Offline is probably best at the moment due to online modes often kicking you off the servers with very little warning, losing any progress for no reason.

7 Days to Die has a lot of great ideas that are sadly pulled back by technical issues and poor implementation. Though a lot of its issues could be sorted with (more) patches, in it’s current state 7 Days to Die feels like an unfinished mess that, simply does not live up to any of its promise or potential.

I'd love to give this game a high score but no matter how addictive it is, you cannot ignore the fact that it's unfinished.

And before anyone comes out with pitchforks and torches saying how wrong I am, look at it this way...

There's the issue of early access that some have brought up in their reviews.
I think this "early access" has perhaps caused confusion.

You see, early access (on steam) allows players to literally play a game while it’s still in development, giving them, well, early access to the game before its eventual release.

Let me say that again...

It allows players to literally play a game while it’s still in development...

Did you get that?

The game is still in development...

And yet it's been released on console as a full, complete game...

So, to release a game on console that's still in development is a big no, no!

Everyone is up in arms when companies like Ubisoft release their games with bugs and glitches, but here we have Telltale Games release a game that is still in development, and everyone comes to their defence?

This makes no sense at all.

Telltale games published 7 Days to Die knowing full well that it's still in early access on steam. They know that the game is not ready to be released on console, and yet they've gone ahead with it anyway.
Another 6-12 months and I'm sure the game would be much more playable than it is right now.

This for me has a large question mark over the integrity of Telltale as a publisher.
If you enjoy 7 days to die, that's fine. Whether or not something is good is subjective, but this game is unfinished, and I for one will not be buying any more of their work.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 14, 2016 8:21 AM BST


Firewatch (PS4)
Firewatch (PS4)

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A walkie talkie, walkie talkie..., 11 Feb. 2016
This review is from: Firewatch (PS4) (Video Game)
Firewatch videogame review

"It's not the destination that's important, but the actual journey."

Kinda like life really. But can the same be said about the video game Firewatch?
Hmmm...possibly...perhaps...maybe...

It's been called a walking simulator by many, and it opens with a series of text-based choices (of which I won't spoil) that establish why protagonist Henry ends up in the Wyoming woods as a solitary fire lookout.

The game deals with serious issues, and it deals with those issues just like actual adults would: sometimes with humour, sometimes with anger, and sometimes with sadness.

Right from the start, the relationship between Henry and Delilah (Henry’s boss and only real human contact throughout the whole game) feels real, even though they’re communicating entirely by radio.

The script is brilliant and voice acting is top notch, and with stunning graphics.
Speaking of which, the Wyoming forest is pretty big and beautifully stylized.
But sadly due to the absence of any wildlife, stops it from feeling like a real place. Well...the only 'wildlife' is a stag at the beginning and a turtle that you find (which you can also adopt and name)

The story is tense, creepy, and funny, sometimes all within a few minutes of each other, and it shows what video game storytelling is capable of...in the right hands that is.

And there were moments in the game where I was actually afraid to turn around in case someone or something jumped out in front of me in this beautifully made game.

As for the controls, they can get a little annoying at times, with running assigned to both the square button and the left stick.
And later on in the game you find a flashlight, which I found pointless to have.

Plus, I find it funny when you get a game where the character gets stuck behind a small rock and you think to yourself, why can't they simply just jump or walk over it? No, you have to navigate back and around the rock otherwise you get stuck.
And then there's the whole pressing the 'x' button as you come to a large step so you can see the animation of your character climbing up or jumping down. Yes it kinda adds to the immersion but it also adds frustration.

As for the playing time, It took me around 4 hours to complete. This is a tricky one for me. Although I don't mind if a game is short, as long as it draws me in which this game did to a point.
Which brings me to one final thing...(and I really don't want to spoil anything here) as soon as I learnt the big revelation on the 'who' and the 'why', I was really disappointed.
And as for the ending...well, I was like...oh, is that it?

So is it worth playing? Oh definitely! However, at a £15 asking price on psn (£13 for a limited time) that depends on the person.

I'll admit, I'm a bit puzzled as to why so many professional reviews gave this game a very high score. Ign for example gave it a 9.3/10!

Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed playing the game, but felt let down by the end.

It's not the destination that's important but the actual journey...

That's partly true for this walking simulator...

Or as I like to call it...a walkie, talkie, walkie talkie...

Ok, I'll let myself out...

The good:

- Immersive world
- Brilliant script
- Memorable characters
- Voice acting is convincing
- Art is stunning -

The bad:

- Gripping story let down by a lacklustre revelation.
- Anticlimactic ending.
- Around 4 hours to complete.

7/10
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 3, 2016 6:10 PM BST


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