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Tom Older (Scotland)

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Poor Folk (Xist Classics)
Poor Folk (Xist Classics)
Price: £0.83

3.0 out of 5 stars This Kindle edition is not Garnett's translation, 31 May 2016
The translation is not by Constance Garnett though advertised as such and though the referring Dover Thrift paper edition on the Amazon UK web page is indeed translated by her and gives this as the Kindle version of same. If like myself you are trying to read as much of Dostoevsky in the classic Garnett translations the translation by Garnett of Poor Folk is not available as a Kindle download.


The Dream Shall Never Die: 100 Days that Changed Scotland Forever
The Dream Shall Never Die: 100 Days that Changed Scotland Forever
Price: £6.49

24 of 101 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It is appropriate that this book is a product of ..., 26 Mar. 2015
It is appropriate that this book is a product of the Murdoch empire which, in the Scottish edition of The Sun, has been backing Mr Salmond for four years. You can tell a man by his friends!
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 1, 2015 8:41 PM BST


Brennenstuhl  1156003018  Premium-Line extension socket 8-way black 3m 05VV-F 3G1,25
Brennenstuhl 1156003018 Premium-Line extension socket 8-way black 3m 05VV-F 3G1,25
Offered by Delightful-UK
Price: £15.99

5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent piece of equipment, worth the extra, 6 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having had a lego-like village of adaptors spreading round my hifi components and attendant lights, this piece of equipment has simplified all. As mentioned in another review, an important aspect is that unlike the cheaper 8-socket two-line adaptors, this single-line piece of kit has enough sideroom beside each plug for plugs to fit in snugly side by side even when, as in my own scenario, one of the plugs is situated on the rotating square of a seven-day timer. It's worth using the Zoom function of the illustration to see what I mean, with the plug socket holes angled to allow this.

If you do need 8 plugs for such as hifi and lights that can all easily run off a 13-amp socket I definitely recommend this over the cheaper options. It's well made too with red indicator that shows when it's on.


The Canterbury Tales In Plain and Simple English (Translated) (Classics Retold)
The Canterbury Tales In Plain and Simple English (Translated) (Classics Retold)
Price: £1.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Chaucer does not need the "Chaucer for dummies" approach, 26 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having decided to reread The Canterbury Tales after many years and having a paperback of the poem in original spelling, I thought I would download this to my Kindle to have as a side-dish as it were to see me through more difficult passages. I find it useless for my purposes. The "original" text in plain font here (the so-called plain English translations being in italic) is a mixture of original and updating of words to make them easier to understand. This may be useful but means one is not actually presented with the original beside a translation, but a kind of hybrid modernisation text with enough of the antique to give it "flavour". And it can't be trusted to be exact.

From the prologue for instance my paperback Laurel Poetry Series version of the original has

Bifel that in that season on a day
In Southwerk at the Taberd as I lay
Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage
To Caunterbury with ful devout corage
At night was come in-to that hostelrye
Wel nyne and twentye in a companye
Of sondry folke by aventure y-falle
In felawshipe and pilgrims wer they alle
That towards Cauntebury woulden ryde;

The "original" in this kindle version becomes

Befell that season on a day
In Southwark at the Tabard as I lay
Ready to wenden on my pilgrimage
To Canterbury with devout corage
At night was come into that hostelry
Well nine and twenty in a company
Of sundry folk, by aventure y-fall who had by chance fallen
In fellowship, and pilgrims were they all, into company.
That toward Canterbury would ride.

What is a phrase glossing the meaning of "aventure -y-fall" is as shown put in as if part of the text, causing a mess. The "translation" proper that follows reduces what is in fact a quite unambiguous piece of verse anyhow to

Now it happened that one day in that season
As I stayed at the Tabard in Southwark
Ready to go on my pilgrimage
To Canterbury in great high spirits
At night there came into that inn
A group of twenty-nine
Diverse people, who had by chance
Fallen in with each other, and they were all pilgrims,
That wanted to ride to Canterbury.

So, "the story" if that's what you want in "plain English".Not a full translation with details missed and a generalised free verse simply giving the impression of full verse translation without it being such.

The quotes should help people make up their own mind, and some mightn't see any problem. My own copy though is deleted from my Kindle as it annoys me in its unreliability of text and rewriting of "translation" in sections where original passages have a meaning that is perfectly clear and better put in the poetry itself.

I will look elsewhere for a translation for my purposes.


Delphi Complete Works of Virgil (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics Book 3)
Delphi Complete Works of Virgil (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics Book 3)
Price: £1.49

5.0 out of 5 stars The Gavin Douglas clinches it, 16 Jun. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It is excellent to have Virgil's complete works including the Aeneid in such portable form, and translations by such as William Morris and Gavin Douglas. The lastmentioned makes this purchase a must for any serious student of Scottish literature or indeed of great poetry translation. I have the four volume Scottish Text Society Gavin Douglas translation, but this is long out of print, and to have the complete text in this digital form here is remarkable, and worthy in itself of notice.


Kandle by Ozeri LED Book Light in Black -- Designed for the Amazon Kindle (fits latest generation Kindle and all models), Sony Reader and other eBook readers
Kandle by Ozeri LED Book Light in Black -- Designed for the Amazon Kindle (fits latest generation Kindle and all models), Sony Reader and other eBook readers
Offered by Ozeri UK
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Just the job, 16 Jun. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I had been irritated by one of these mini hanging-steetlamp attachments I had previously purchased to read my Kindle with: the light wasn't disseminated properly on the page, and they are a clumsy sort of thing to have on the Kindle when you are trying to read especially in bed.

The Kandle works perfectly. Excellent strong light diffused evenly down the page, and discreet enough when attached that one can lie on one's side and read, no bother. Has passed the benchmark test several times now, which is to say the sound of my wife gently snoring while I carry on with my book.

Highly recommended, and the best choice I would say at this Amazon price.


The Collected Short Stories of Anton Chekhov Volume II: 109 Short Stories (Unexpurgated Edition) (Halcyon Classics)
The Collected Short Stories of Anton Chekhov Volume II: 109 Short Stories (Unexpurgated Edition) (Halcyon Classics)
Price: £1.49

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Constance Garnett the translator, with eight duplicate stories translated by others, 7 Jun. 2014
Complaints that the translator's name is not given are justified, though a look at the website Project Gutenburg at www.gutenburg.org reveals that both volumes 1 and 2 of the Collected Short Stories here are a gathering of the Constance Garnett translations published in 13 volumes separately available to be viewed online or downloaded for emailing to Kindle.

However the compilers in it would appear using the Gutenburg selection as source have made the mistake of adding to the from there a sequence of translations not by Garnett, "The House with the Mezzanine", "Typhus", "Gooseberries", "In Exile", "The Lady with the Toy Dog", "Goussiev", and "My Life". These are translated by SS Koteliansky and Gilbert Canaan as published by Scribners in 1916; and the stories appear already in the Garnett translations provided: for example Garnett's "The Lady with the Dog" thus reappears in the Scribner sequence as "The Lady with the Toy Dog". Finally the story in Volume 2 "The Slanderer" is as translated by Herman Bernstein in 1901 has already appeared in Volume 1 as "A Slander" translated by Garnett.

So in addition to eight stories wrongly duplicated and by other translaters as noted above, these two Collected Chekhov Short Stories volumes are as appeared through 13 volumes in the St Martins Library translated by Constance Garnett in the early part of the twentieth century.

For myself a selection of Chekhov's short stories as translated by Garnett has long been my Desert Island Disc choice for the book I would take. Having the whole lot on a Kindle volume should of course make that visit to the desert island a little easier.


Family Life [DVD]
Family Life [DVD]
Dvd ~ Sandy Ratcliff
Price: £10.00

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars polemic guised as naturalism, 28 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Family Life [DVD] (DVD)
This is a polemical retelling via David Mercer of Laing's great book The Divided Self of 1960. Laing was himself from what might be called a toxic family, his mother as instance having burned the little wooden horse on wheels he had as an infant, according to his autobiography, as "she thought I was getting too fond of it". Toxic parenting he came to see as instrumental in schizoid mental breakdowns where psychotic language dismissed as "scizophrenic" could in fact be seen as presenting symbolic overviews of the totalised situation in which the "patient" found themselves. In the Divided Self Laing extends this view to consider as toxic the triangle between doctor, students and patient in the psychiatrist Kraepelin's quoted 1905 parading of a schizophrenic before a class of medical students; in the Family Life film this demonstration is presented as if a contemporary (1971) conclusion to the film's proceedings.

After the extraordinary brilliance of his debut book The Divided Self, Laing progressed over years to become a kind of cult guru figure, having substituted the notion of the toxic family to a view of the world as itself globally toxic through violence deceit and miltary carnage; he came to romanticise psychotic breakdowns as "breakthroughs"; and to equate psychosis in the face of this toxic world almost as shamanic visionariness; this ran alongside an increasing obsession with supposed prenatal traumatic experience in individuals as presenting the need for "rebirthing"—a curious melange of Scottish born-again evangelicism and New Age mysticism.

Though myself an admirer of Laing the pioneer analytic understander of the "patient" as necessarily and demonstrably as fully human as the observing professional; this powerful film would in a sense be as appropriate to see its truth as much to do with workingclass generation-gap cultural explorations of a film like Keith Waterhouses "Billy Liar" as anything to do with the contemporary NHS. Lack of psycotherapeutic counselling today for instance is surely as much to do with a lack of funding there applied, as anything to do with a rejection of its efficacy. And simply from this film to see that pretty well anything is better than corporate drug prescribing, is the kind of opinion it is the easier to have if one has not actually suffered—and the key word is suffered—serious mental illness. The trouble with Laing is that he did so much of his suffering in childhood. His sympathy with those who suffered in mental wards led dangerously close to his canonising them as lay saints and artists-manque at the expense of their actual suffering. For this, whilst the Divided Self was one of the great books of the twentieth century, Laing's The Politics of Experience I believe to have been one of the most irresponsible. Irresponsible that is, to those suffering illness as distinct from the chic followers of alternative New Age culture for whom the work seemed attractive.

A powerful film, a polemic in the guise of naturalism. But as a comment on mental illness, its portrayal of ECT routinely applied to a young girl whose crime seems to have been to upset her parents and want to stay out late, is hardly the basis for a true understanding either of the actual worth of RD Laing or the state of the mental health service.


Overcoming Depression: A self- help guide using Cognitive Behavioural Techniques
Overcoming Depression: A self- help guide using Cognitive Behavioural Techniques
by Paul Gilbert
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.09

23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars too much fashionable talk, Fennell more concise and practical, 20 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having suffered periods of depression with occasional hospitalisation in the past thirty years I have been stable and episode-free this past few years, though with occasional "warnings" of mind-change that prompt corrective action being taken. I have basically learned how to manage myself, or at least the need to do so. After one such "warning" earlier this year I bought this book though seemed to improve again by the time it came and just put it on the shelf. After another of my sudden warning dips a few days ago I though it time to become involved in Gilbert's book. But it is not to my taste.

It is so big, nearly 600 pages long. Frankly when I am depressed the last thing I need is a huge rather chatty book with "philosophies" such as the bright idea that systematic compassion is good for you. I feel that it essentially is a book written by a now populist writer in conjunction with an NHS trust wholly committed to the least expensive ways of dealing with illness. Enter "mindfulness" as the now-fashion which along with CBT has swept the boards, both being cheap in that they concentrate on the here and now to the exclusion of all expensive slow therapy; it's corrective behaviourism against psychotherapy again, the latter which is time consuming and labour intensive. Bhuddhism and the philosophy of the Dalai Lama are here cited as having helped many people "for thousands of years" but I do not find its being promoted by an NHS Trust doctor any the less questionable however allegedly exciting is the "new research of the past ten years". Mindfulness meditation routines and CBT are obviously the current routes of choice of the Derbyshire NHS Trust it would seem, and this I hope is of help to many. But I will not be alone in being intellectually resistant to a deal of this, and do not accept that such scepticism is mere negative depressive thinking.

I am in fact not at all against CBT itself having found it useful in conjunction with other medical help. But the CBT book in this series I have found a boon is Melanie Fennell's Overcoming Low Self-Esteem That is a really excellent, eminently practical, cut to the chase book, with no breezy attitudinising or chat or exhortations to meditation etc from the author. I think it's a terrifically helpful book especially for many of us for whom low self-esteem and depression can be and are synonymous. I've bought and given two copies of that away, though make sure there is always one on my shelf. On the other hand if you want a book twice the size with NHS Trust current overview on depression and guides to CBT meditation and "mindfulness" then Gilbert might be what suits you.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 21, 2015 7:38 PM GMT


New Genuine Original HP Hewlett Packard N015 high capacity black C6615AE / C6615DE HP15 printer ink - print inkjet cartridge - ( click to view Supported printers inlcuding officejet deskjet and fax series ) unboxed
New Genuine Original HP Hewlett Packard N015 high capacity black C6615AE / C6615DE HP15 printer ink - print inkjet cartridge - ( click to view Supported printers inlcuding officejet deskjet and fax series ) unboxed
Offered by OfficeClearance/OUR-PRICE-20%-UK VAT INCL.
Price: £38.04

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars won't bother again, 14 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought two of these in October, thanked them for quick despatch, didn't in fact open them until December when I was doing my annual printing of a number of homemade Christmas cards. Sufficient to say that this year's homemade card is now in black and white, and the refills are in the bin with my previous almost empty cartridge reinstalled just to keep the black cartridge operating.
In fairness to the seller of these I can only say that other cheap colour cartridges I have bought have also turned out duff or at best like a faint watercolour. So no great surprise, if only regret that another £26 is down the toilet pan as it is too late to return them.
For cheap cartridges, yes I would reckon black cartridges are worth the punt. For colour cartridges, I won't be wasting any more money, albeit that the full price of new ones is so ridiculously high. At least my £26 could have paid for half of one.


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