Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for Angela Buckley > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Angela Buckley
Top Reviewer Ranking: 35,002
Helpful Votes: 147

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Angela Buckley

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
pixel
Death of an Assassin: The True Story of the German Murderer Who Died Defending Robert E. Lee (True Crime History)
Death of an Assassin: The True Story of the German Murderer Who Died Defending Robert E. Lee (True Crime History)
Price: £18.04

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A unique and compelling true crime history, 1 Sept. 2017
It is rare to come across a brand-new historical crime case, as many have been written about many times before, so ‘Death of An Assassin’ is a real treat for true crime lovers. This fascinating account begins in the German town of Bönnigheim, in 1835 and follows the twists and turns of a real-life murder investigation across two continents to the battlefields of the American Civil War. It is a remarkable tale, which links the killer of a small town mayor to one of the most famous generals in American history, Robert E. Lee.
Through meticulous research, Ann Marie Ackermann has pieced together this unusual case. Her narrative is gripping throughout with evocative descriptions, detailed background information and engaging characters. In addition, ‘Death of An Assassin’ encompasses a wide range of themes, such as American-Mexican history and early forensic ballistics, all skilfully woven into an intriguing murder mystery. It is a compelling read and I would highly recommend it.

Disclosure: I received a free copy in return for an honest review.


Tracing Your Manchester and Salford Ancestors
Tracing Your Manchester and Salford Ancestors
by Sue Wilkes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An essential family history guide, 21 Jun. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Many of my ancestors are from my home city of Manchester and its neighbour Salford, so I was very keen to find out more about how to research my links to these two important cities and their shared history. This comprehensive guide has been the perfect companion to my ongoing research.

Tracing Your Manchester & Salford Ancestors is an essential reference book for all those interested in the two cities, whether to study their colourful histories or if searching for more personal family connections. The chapters feature key topics, such as transportation, trade, health, crime and social conditions, and are packed full of detailed information. In her highly-readable book, experienced historian and author Sue Wilkes covers a wide range of relevant and fascinating topics, supported by interesting examples and useful links. For both beginners and more experienced researchers, there is a wealth of resources and helpful advice on all aspects of life in the past in Manchester and Salford. This outstanding reference book has inspired me to take my own family research further and has re-awakened my interest in the history of my home city. Highly recommended.


The Last Days of Leda Grey
The Last Days of Leda Grey
by Essie Fox
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.08

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A magical and beguiling read, 24 Dec. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
‘The Last Days of Leda Grey’ is a compelling and haunting tale of longing, loss and betrayal, experienced through the magic of silent films. When journalist Ed Peters discovers the alluring photograph of actress Leda Grey, he is drawn into the dark secrets of her past encounters with enigmatic film maker, Charles Beauvois. Leda, who is now a recluse, draws the young man into her world, in which fantasy merges with real life, through the dusky lens of early film. Set in the 1970s, in the decaying cliff-top house where Leda still lives, Ed Peters uncovers both the glamour and tragedy of the past, which leads to illusion and danger.

Essie Fox is a wonderful writer, and her novel is beautifully written, with layers of sensuous imagery. The book draws you in at the start and takes you on a journey into the intriguing world of silent films, through the bewitching character of Leda Grey. Moving between Leda’s recollections and Ed’s observations, the narrative changes constantly, with subtle shifts in the story, which is gripping throughout and leads to a dramatic and unexpected climax. ‘The Last Days of Leda Grey’ is a magical and beguiling read and I would highly recommend it.


The Lost Story of the William and Mary: The Cowardice of Captain Stinson
The Lost Story of the William and Mary: The Cowardice of Captain Stinson
by Gill Hoffs
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling story of a despicable act, 26 Oct. 2016
When the emigrant ship the William and Mary set sail from Liverpool in 1853 with some 200 passengers on board, those searching for a new life overseas had no idea that their journey would end in disease, disaster and betrayal by their captain, Timothy Stinson, who commits an atrocious act of cowardice. This powerful and extremely readable book takes the reader on that ill-fated journey to its dreadful conclusion. The Lost Story of the William & Mary is gripping from the outset - a rollercoaster of a ride experiencing brutal conditions, deception and loss. It is not for the faint-hearted!

Author Gill Hoffs is a consummate story teller and she builds this poignant narrative through meticulous research and evocative writing. She brings the characters to life through their personal histories, relating their reasons for emigration and their experiences on board the ship. Their stories are haunting and they stay with you long after the conclusion of this terrifying journey. Using first-hand accounts and contemporary newspaper reports, Hoffs re-creates the fate of individual passengers as they navigate the shark-infested waters of the Bahamas. The narrative is full of suspense and action, building tension from the very beginning. It is a chilling and compulsive read, within the shadow of the inevitable fate of the vulnerable individuals on board and their desperate situation. Despite the tragedy and atrocity of the event, the book reaches a satisfying conclusion, with detailed information about what happened to those who survived the shipwreck.

The Lost Story of the William & Mary is an excellent book and I would highly recommend it.


Bodysnatchers: Digging Up The Untold Stories of Britain s Resurrection Men
Bodysnatchers: Digging Up The Untold Stories of Britain s Resurrection Men
by Suzie Lennox
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.38

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling read, 2 Sept. 2016
‘Bodysnatchers’ is a chilling but utterly fascinating read, tracing the little known story of the infamous Resurrection Men. It is packed full of intriguing anecdotes, dark humour and tantalising details. There are exhumations, public outrage and violated cadavers aplenty. The book follows the development of anatomical studies, which required bodies for dissection, and sets the nefarious practice of bodysnatching clearly into its context, with a detailed background history. It explores the reaction of the general public and their fears for their own ‘fate’ after death. Most interestingly, it gives a very thorough account of the bodysnatchers’ modus operandi, including their ingenious methods of transportation and their battles with the ever-vigilant watchmen.

Suzie Lennox has created a very readable and illuminating history. Her meticulous research is presented through a compelling narrative, and there is a good balance of factual information and colourful cases. The details are gruesome and quirky, such as the devices created by the Victorians to prevent their bodies being dug up. It also features prominent surgeons, as well as the exploits of the more famous Resurrectionists, such as Burke and Hare.

‘Bodysnatchers’ is an excellent book and highly recommended, especially for those who enjoy a walk on the dark side of history.


Poison Panic: Arsenic Deaths in 1840s Essex
Poison Panic: Arsenic Deaths in 1840s Essex
by Helen Barrell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A clever mix of family history and true crime, 27 July 2016
‘Poison Panic’ explores a series of long-forgotten but fascinating real-life cases of arsenic poisoning in 1840s Essex. The background to the cases is clearly explained and well-illustrated, setting the alleged crimes solidly in their geographical and social settings, and with the underlying question of whether these women really were murderers, or victims of circumstances. The stories reveal a mid-Victorian fascination with, and fear of, poisoning, sometimes linked to financial gain through subscriptions to burial clubs. The occurrence of arsenic poisoning in the county of Essex is really quite shocking!

The three main cases, which all have different outcomes, are brilliantly re-created through Helen Barrell’s meticulous research. Her style is straightforward and clear, examining the circumstances of each woman, the key events and the subsequent trials. She gives a rich insight into their lives, their relationships and their daily struggles. There are interesting links throughout between the crimes and the local environment, as well as wider society and early developments in forensic science. It is a very readable narrative, which successfully brings the characters back to life, with detailed descriptions, photographs and images. The book is even peppered with the author’s own ancestors, which adds an intriguing personal dimension.

‘Poison Panic’ is a clever mix of family history and true crime. It is an excellent book and a must read for all lovers of historic crime.


The Case of the Chocolate Cream Killer: The Poisonous Passion of Christiana Edmunds
The Case of the Chocolate Cream Killer: The Poisonous Passion of Christiana Edmunds
Price: £6.54

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Murder, Madness and Chocolate, 19 Jun. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In the genteel surroundings of 19th century Brighton, a serial killer is on the loose. Following the death of four-year-old Sidney Barker, an investigation is launched into the almost-unbelievable possibility that the murderer is using poisoned sweets to carry out their deadly campaign. The police investigate a case, which has all the classic elements of crime fiction: murder, madness and chocolate. But this is real life.

‘The Case of the Chocolate Cream Killer’ explores the sinister story of poisoner Christiana Edmund who, fuelled by an unrequited passion, set out on a lethal course of action. Kaye Jones skilfully re-creates Christiana Edmunds’s story with meticulous research and evocative description, taking the reader on a journey into the darker side of Victorian life, through powerful themes such as mental health issues, asylums and substance abuse. It is an excellent book and a must-read for all lovers of Victorian true crime!


Historical Research Using British Newspa
Historical Research Using British Newspa
by Denise Bates
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.38

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent guide to a fantastic resource, 22 May 2016
This excellent guide to the increasingly accessible source of contemporary newspapers, is essential for all types of historical research, from family history to academic study. The book opens with an extremely useful introduction to all aspects old newspapers, including the history of specific titles and the processes of publication. The reader is then guided through the different uses of this rich resource within a range of research activities, with practical tips and advice, clear instructions and interesting case studies.

Denise Bates writes confidently and with authority on this fascinating topic and her advice is invaluable. She addresses all kinds of readers and researchers, from beginners to more experienced historians and there is something new for everyone to learn. She explains more complex usages, such as data handling techniques, with ease and clarity.

I use historical newspapers regularly in my work and yet there was plenty of interesting ideas and new ways of exploiting this wonderful resource for me to try. ‘Historical Research Using British Newspapers’ is indispensable for all those interested in history and I would highly recommend it.


Angel Meadow: Victorian Britain's Most Savage Slum
Angel Meadow: Victorian Britain's Most Savage Slum
by Dean Kirby
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.78

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating journey into Victorian Manchester's dark underworld, 26 Feb. 2016
Angel Meadow in Manchester was one of the poorest and most dangerous slums in Victorian England. In the aftermath of the Industrial Revolution, this infamous rookery was populated by thieves and prostitutes, violent street fighters (scuttlers) and families on the brink of starvation. In his début book, journalist Dean Kirby guides contemporary readers through the dark, labyrinthine streets of this notorious quarter of the 19th century underworld, following in the footsteps of the great social commentators of the past.

This compelling account is evocative and powerful, with all the vile smells and sights of the time. There are colourful, and often nefarious characters, startling events and shocking glimpses into life at the very bottom of the heap in Victorian England. The book covers a wide range of themes, such as the devastating cholera epidemics, the desperate plight of Irish immigrants and the staggering crime rates. Dean Kirby brings the often-forgotten history of Angel Meadow vividly back to life, with its gin palaces, drinking dens, conmen and cracksmen, in his meticulously researched and well-written narrative.

I found this book completely fascinating from beginning to end and I thoroughly enjoyed reading about my home city’s dark past, through the stories of Angel Meadow. I would highly recommend it for all but beware, it is not a journey for the faint-hearted!


Regency Spies: Secret Histories of Britain's Rebels and Revolutionaries
Regency Spies: Secret Histories of Britain's Rebels and Revolutionaries
by Sue Wilkes
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.58

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An intriguing history of spies and subterfuge, 26 Feb. 2016
Regency Spies explores the enticing, and often dangerous, world of late Georgian espionage. With the threat of riot and revolution from continental Europe at the end of the 18th century, the British government strengthened its own network of spies and informers to maintain security. The book abounds with clandestine plots, insurrections, secret societies and mutinies, as individuals from all sides sought to acquire vital information to further their cause.

The book covers a wide range of events and themes from the Regency period, including social injustice, regional unrest, politics and power. It gives a fascinating insight into the criminal justice system, relationships between Britain and its neighbours, Ireland and France, and the impact of the Industrial Revolution. No stone is left unturned and the book features uprisings in all parts of the country, from Luddite action in Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire to political rallies in Manchester and Glasgow. Regency Spies is meticulously researched and Sue Wilkes shares this comprehensive history, with lively and evocative detail in a highly readable narrative.

I found Regency Spies extremely informative and a real pleasure to read. I learnt so much about this turbulent period of history and about those who operated undercover in its climate of fear and distrust. I would highly recommend it for all.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5