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peetm (Oxford)

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Samsung Wireless Inductive Quick Qi Charger Compatible with Samsung Galaxy
Samsung Wireless Inductive Quick Qi Charger Compatible with Samsung Galaxy
Price: £29.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I have a Galaxy S8+ and bought this assuming that ..., 8 Aug. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have a Galaxy S8+ and bought this assuming that I could plug it in and off I'd go. However, it doesn't come with a lead, and the S8 USB-C doesn't fit it - it apparently needs an S7 micro USB lead in order to use it. Looking around for one of those, it costs about the same as this did (on Prime day), so sadly I had to return it.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 10, 2017 12:22 AM BST


Vax VRS2051 Astrata 2 Cylinder Vacuum Cleaner, 1700 W - Blue
Vax VRS2051 Astrata 2 Cylinder Vacuum Cleaner, 1700 W - Blue

1.0 out of 5 stars Sent it back, 8 Aug. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Far too powerful. Even with the vent open on the handle you can hardly move it across a carpet.


Amazon Echo, Black (previous generation)
Amazon Echo, Black (previous generation)
Price: £149.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Very limited, 8 Aug. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I use it just to ask it play some music or tune in to a radio station. Other than that, it seems pretty dumb really; and the 'skills' are all a bit lame in my opinion.


Big Data: How the Information Revolution Is Transforming Our Lives (Hot Science)
Big Data: How the Information Revolution Is Transforming Our Lives (Hot Science)
by Brian Clegg
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.52

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clegg writes with an easy clarity that draws us in - no technical expertise ..., 8 Aug. 2017
I first became involved with what we now term big data when providing some mathematical assistance to a major supermarket. They wanted to know what products would suffer, or benefit, if another product were put on special offer – the victims and victors as they called them. As an example, if fresh meat pies are put on buy one get one free, should the supermarket plan on stocking more fresh vegetables? That sort of thing. The supermarket in question had a lot of data concerning historical sales, and what had previously been put on special offer, so it was just a case of designing a set of algorithms to analyse this data to provide the necessary forecast, and also to have the system learn through what we would now call reinforcement learning over time. This was back in the mid 90s. One can imagine how things - in all camps - should have vastly improved since then. That’s just one example of where Big Data transparently impacts our lives.

In Big Data, Clegg sets out an assortment of examples from the success of Netflix and the prediction of crime locations to algorithms that have lost people their jobs or caused stock market crashes, examining the mechanisms and implications of each. Taking the supermarket example - although this is my example and not his - we might ask ourselves who really benefits here – who exactly are the victims and victors (or villains perhaps) in real life?

Big Data is here to stay - should we be afraid of it or embrace it? As always, Clegg writes with an easy clarity that draws us in - no technical expertise required to understand his exploration of this essential subject - and throughout Big Data’s highly enjoyable pages, the spread and range of material is highly impressive – dizzying in fact. I personally found entirely new perspectives on the subject that will keep me pondering for quite some time.

I should add that, if I were still a statistics lecturer at Oxford, I would recommend the book to my students as bedside reading.


Vax VRS2052 Astrata 2 Cylinder Vacuum Cleaner, 800 W - Blue
Vax VRS2052 Astrata 2 Cylinder Vacuum Cleaner, 800 W - Blue
Offered by Electrical Emporium
Price: £54.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Feels like I've had a complete workout once I've hoovered every ..., 19 May 2017
I agree, it's far too powerful. Feels like I've had a complete workout once I've hoovered every room.


The Reality Frame: Relativity and our place in the universe
The Reality Frame: Relativity and our place in the universe
by Brian Clegg
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.34

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Clegg's very best! Couldn't put it down., 7 May 2017
I’ve read quite a few of Brian Clegg’s books, but this one’s outstanding. Relativity is a topic that many writers struggle to get across - Clegg does this brilliantly thanks to two tactics I’ve never seen before. First he makes use of that most fundamental requirement for relativity, the frame of reference. It’s not just the title of the book that suggests frames of reference - this concept forms the backbone of his exploration of relativity. But then he goes totally mad and builds a universe from scratch!

This audacious approach enables us to see, piece by piece, that relativity is about far more than Einstein’s work - fascinating though that is. It’s not that he ignores special and general relativity. There’s even an appendix where he shows how it only takes a maths GCSE to follow the mathematics that make time dilation happen. But he goes far beyond it. For example, in the final chapters he introduces life and creativity to his universe and shows the essential roles that relativity and frames of reference have to play in those cases.

In bringing in creativity, Clegg gives the book a human focus, and this then builds to a chance to reassess humanity’s place in the universe. The book mentions Bronowski's classic The Ascent of Man, and I don’t think it’s over the top to class this as an Ascent of Man for the twenty-first century. I thought I knew the basics of relativity - yet despite never becoming over-technical, The Reality Frame really opened my eyes to a different way of looking at the universe. Clegg quotes my favourite physicist, Richard Feynman on the laws of nature - this is a chance to see those laws in a new light.


His Master's Voice
His Master's Voice
by Stanislaw Lem
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What a waste of money, 4 Jan. 2017
This review is from: His Master's Voice (Paperback)
First person with a third person tint; full of extraneous and pointless waffle. No hard science whatsoever. Drags on 'til you want to scream! Got just over half way through by biting my lip, then it went in the trash where it belongs. What a waste of money.


William Armstrong: Magician of the North
William Armstrong: Magician of the North
by Henrietta Heald
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it., 13 Dec. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I loved every second I spent with this book. Stunning that it's the author's first; it's so polished that one would think that it's surely one of many that went before.


The Grand Tour Season 1
The Grand Tour Season 1
Dvd

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 20 Nov. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bloody marvellous chaps!


The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden
The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden
by Jonas Jonasson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Ok, just ok., 7 Sept. 2015
I really enjoyed reading this - to start with. However, as I got further into it, it seemed like the author was writing from a stream of consciousness with little regard to upstream plot development or even simple reality: I really wondered whether I wanted to carry on reading after Holger One not only survived a free fall from 2,000 feet, but managed to do so - coming through his own roof - at terminal velocity! An example of plot frustration was to be found with Nombeko’s diamonds, which feature heavily initially. These get turned into a large sum of cash, and then come to a premature and anticlimactic end when the author seemingly gets bored with it all and has the cash burn up in a rucksack (and even then it seems a bit unbelievable, that, A) it could have easily been saved, and, B) that the rucksack would have burned up so quickly and so completely. In essence, the whole diamonds stuff could have been left out as it served no purpose except to tease and frustrate.

Frustration continues with the evermore annoying predictability of Holger One’s and Celestine’s ability to cause disaster at every turn – truly, anyone in the right mind would have ditched this pair of 'accidents waiting to happen' (probably on the next page) as soon as Nombeko arrived in Sweden.

That all said … once you get past the realisation that we’re really in fantasy land really, you learn to go with the flow – and aren’t at all surprised to find that you can simply nip off with the King, and Prime Minister of Sweden in the back of a potatoe truck for drinks and a DIY supper.

In summary. As a whole, I did enjoy it(ish), and I must say that I did like the wacky sense of humour in the writing style: slightly Monty Python, slightly Goon like – if you remember them?


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