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Should Amazon Abolish the Negative Vote Altogether?


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In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jul 2014, 17:39:17 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:44:04 BST]

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jul 2014, 20:12:16 BST
Last edited by the author on 24 Jul 2014, 20:12:27 BST
NeuroSplicer says:
One should not allow children stake knives.
And Amazon should do the same with the negative vote when it comes to Trolls, company shills and family members of the author who received a critical review.

Falling to do both would inevitably lead to the conclusion that the negative vote should be abolished.
As would stake knives, I am convinced, if there were no effective way to keep them out of the reach of children.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jul 2014, 20:37:05 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:43:24 BST]

Posted on 25 Jul 2014, 15:27:10 BST
Quiverbow says:
"No voting more than once on the same person."

That's a bit unfair on the person who writes really good helpful book reviews (or any good reviews). Are you suggesting that I could vote just once for a particular reviewer even though he has a lot of really helpful reviews?

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Jul 2014, 15:54:33 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:42:39 BST]

Posted on 25 Jul 2014, 22:36:31 BST
Thats just silly. It means you are not voting that you found a review helpful, you are voting that you found a reviewer helpful. But thats not what you vote for.

Besides, what happens if somebody loves my pump review, but loathes my review of those fence tacks, on the basis that it contained no poetry. What would they do then?

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 06:53:54 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:42:27 BST]

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 07:59:17 BST
"The majority of customers IMO browse products, not reviewers."

Yes, that was precisely my point. People vote on reviews of a product. This is as it should be.

"Occasionally they might see the same reviewer again, but not often."

This is nonsense. If I like scifi books, there are a number of reviewers I will see time and time again. Ditto Country & Western Music. Ditto Vegetarian Cooking. Ditto whatever niche you care to mention.

Your logic only holds up if you assume customers will pick products at random over the entire Amazon stock catalogue.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 08:12:12 BST
Bob says:
I have a small number of people who look at my book reviews and I at theirs. We don't often vote for each other as the purpose is just to see what each is reading. But I can see reviewers getting a following on the basis if the type of books they like and hence pick up more votes - & + than those without a following.

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 08:31:04 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:42:00 BST]

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 11:32:13 BST
You logic is completely flawed.

1. Reviewers are customers.
2. Reviewers specialise because they review stuff they like.
3. Customers buy stuff they like.

But the biggest flaw in your logic is:

4. Most customers don't care one iota about the review system.

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 12:33:12 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:41:54 BST]

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 12:52:09 BST
Last edited by the author on 26 Jul 2014, 12:54:38 BST
Quiverbow says:
Take The Rolling Stones as an example. Now, those that review Rolling Stones items will tend to be the same people. Those who read those reviews will also tend to be the same people. It then stands to reason that the readers will vote on a particular reviewer more than once simply because they are reviewing items by their favourite artist. I doubt many will rush to read a non RS review by someone and vote on that simply because they like what he says about that group.

What Amazon should do is stop anyone from voting on an item once they have bought it or reviewed it themselves.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 13:10:41 BST
I am sure QB there is a software fix for that. However, in my e-mails with Amazon, they don't want to prevent people from voting. They want to keep their limitations limited. If you are coming to their web site to vote somebody down, you are still coming to their web site.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 13:21:35 BST
Now you are getting your argument confused:

"If most customers don't care (or even know) about the review system, then there is no reason for them to do anything other than leave a genuine vote. "helpful" if they found the review helpful. "unhelpful" if they found the review unhelpful. "

Exactly, and why should it matter if they vote for two reviews that just happen to be written by the same person.

In fact, its quite likely. Take for instance, when I wanted to erect a fence. I bought one item, and Amazon automatically showed me what other people buying that item had also bought. I was therefore able, at a glance, to see what else might be required, and buy accordingly. So, I've bought 3 or 4 items, on Amazon's recommendation. Now, supposing I review all my items. What happens when the next person comes along to buy stuff to put up a fence with? They get the same recommendations, and immediately will be shown three or four products which I have reviewed.

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 13:37:11 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:41:40 BST]

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 14:19:51 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:41:34 BST]

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 14:47:31 BST
Now you are just being arrogant. How can you possibly know why other people would have a different point of view from you? I don't care about voting games at all. I will give a review a positive vote if it helps me, or a negative if I think they've written a lot of guff. If the same person has written two reviews that I found helpful, then they get (and deserve) two votes.

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 16:05:16 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:41:22 BST]

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2014, 18:58:14 BST
[Deleted by the author on 26 Jul 2014, 19:01:44 BST]

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 19:23:26 BST
[Deleted by the author on 26 Jul 2014, 19:23:40 BST]

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 19:46:09 BST
[Deleted by the author on 26 Jul 2014, 19:46:14 BST]

Posted on 26 Jul 2014, 19:53:01 BST
[Deleted by the author on 26 Jul 2014, 19:53:12 BST]

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Aug 2014, 10:47:44 BST
Last edited by the author on 5 Aug 2014, 10:48:26 BST
Bonemonkey's logic is flawed, pointing out large numbers of books or CDs makes no sense. People do not choose randomly from thousands of authors or musicians; they have favourites and a small number of artists do well and attract a lot of interest.

So it is quite possible that reviewers who are knowledgeable about these artists will be seen by customers many times over and it is quite reasonable that they will actively be sought out for the best reviews.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Aug 2014, 11:14:28 BST
[Deleted by Amazon on 11 Oct 2014, 16:39:21 BST]
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