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Historical Fiction


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Showing 26-50 of 88 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 14:57:00 GMT
JazzLover says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 14:57:13 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 3 Dec 2012 15:05:40 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 14:57:30 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 3 Dec 2012 15:05:33 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 15:03:30 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 3 Dec 2012 15:05:27 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 16:17:17 GMT
Inge H. Borg says:
There are many more recent and excellent Egyptian HF novels...
Check out Khamsin, The Devil Wind of The Nile, and its present-day sequel, Sirocco, Storm over Land and Sea. Or Pharaoh's Son, A Killing Among the Dead. All are beautifully written and well researched.

Posted on 3 Dec 2012 16:43:32 GMT
Last edited by the author on 3 Dec 2012 16:47:18 GMT
S Riaz says:
Some WWI non fiction I've liked is Thirteen Days: The Road to the First World War: Diplomacy and Disaster -The Countdown to the Great War and King, Kaiser, Tsar: Three Royal Cousins Who Led the World to War.
In fiction, I also like the trilogy by Christina Croft, first book is Shattered Crowns: The Scapegoats.
An Egyptian historical novel I thought was excellent was The Memoirs of Cleopatra.

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 17:55:53 GMT
monica says:
Under Fire (Penguin Modern Classics).

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2012 02:34:09 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Dec 2012 03:09:36 GMT
One towering WWI book we have not mentioned, and that really reads like fiction, is "Storm of Steel" by Ernst Junger. The Great War seen from the German side, by a very gifted observer and writer. Maybe the best WWI memoir of them all.

Posted on 4 Dec 2012 14:37:41 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 4 Dec 2012 22:30:02 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2012 19:51:52 GMT
Annie says:
oh, LOL Paul - how sad that you so need to push this book. To try to call the 60's "historical" is the biggest joke of the day. What is it about this book you feel the need to push on so many threads ?? I really would like to know.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2012 20:20:48 GMT
Sou'Wester says:
I'm not so sure the 1960s doesn't qualify as historical; the world has changed dramatically since that time - especially in the mining communities where this book is set. I have to say that the setting and the idea behind the book seems quite original and appealing. Unfortunately, the multiple posting of this recommendation across so many threads is - as others have remarked - very off-putting, and that would be a shame if the author himself is not actually involved.
I did have a quick look at the book; get the impression that the author knows his subject very well but, unfortunately, he's not a natural writer and the prose didn't engage or stimulate me at all. With a bit of help - and some proper editing - there might be a good book here, but it really needed a lot more work and polish before being put into print.

Posted on 5 Dec 2012 11:08:45 GMT
I Readalot says:
The question about how far back a novel has to be set to be considered historical is an interesting one. I think it partly depends on the age of the person reading it, if you lived through the period described you may not think of it as historical (although technically it is) but if you were born years later you probably will. Generally in the literary world any book written about a time period earlier than the one we are living in as classed as historical whether it is the 1500's or 1970's. However a book written in the 1970's, for example about the 1970's is a contemporary novel.

Posted on 5 Dec 2012 16:06:14 GMT
M. Dowden says:
I was reading a while back about a book from the 19th Century. At the time it was considered historical fiction and was written like one of Walter Scott's such novels. The only thing was that the events it portrayed in Europe happened about two to three years beforehand, arguably not that historical. It is like reading a WWII novel written at the time. Nowadays some would consider it an historical novel, whereas others wouldn't because it was written at the time it describes.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Dec 2012 16:44:02 GMT
Jacquie says:
Day Of The Jackel - One of my favorite books of all time. The movie was good, but the book was better. I've read all of Forsyth's books, but none can beat Day of the Jackel.

Posted on 7 Dec 2012 22:19:29 GMT
Rose Tremain's Restoration and Music and Silence are well recommended. As is Thomas Keneally's The Playmaker.

Posted on 11 Dec 2012 06:46:47 GMT
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Posted on 12 Dec 2012 18:42:19 GMT
M. Bedford says:
For historical fiction, Bernard Cornwell is your best bet:) I love his Warload series

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Dec 2012 08:35:33 GMT
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Posted on 13 Dec 2012 21:25:17 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 13 Dec 2012 21:44:48 GMT
"I love his Warload [sic] series"

I liked the Warlord Chronicles too, even if the third was the weakest.

I wish they'd film them.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Dec 2012 12:45:54 GMT
Kimbiker says:
The Religion - Tim Willocks, outstanding and great value at the moment. Morgans Run - Colleen McCulloch.

Posted on 16 Dec 2012 15:24:01 GMT
I've already read Willocks; I thought Green River Rising was better.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Dec 2012 12:37:00 GMT
Kimbiker says:
Its on my wish list Ryan, thanks for the recommendation.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Dec 2012 13:26:23 GMT
jaka says:
I can highly recommend 'The four horsemen of the Apocalypse' by the Spanish novelist, Vicente Blasco Ibanez. As well as a novelist, he was also a political activist and eventually left Spain to live in France. He wrote this novel in Paris in 1916 and describes events leading up to and during the 1st WW from the eyes of a South American family with strong European links and who decide to move to Paris just as war is building up (much to their shock and horror). It's a classic.

Posted on 17 Dec 2012 16:10:42 GMT
M. Dowden says:
jaka, that was one of the first novels that I read when I was old enough to join the adult library in my teens. I've got it downloaded on my kindle but haven't got round to re-reading it yet. I have always found it one of those stories that stays with you.
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Discussion in:  fiction discussion forum
Participants:  49
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Initial post:  26 Nov 2012
Latest post:  31 Oct 2013

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