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Rosewater by [Thompson, Tade]
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Rosewater Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 298 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

Tade Thompson lives and works in the UK. He is the author of a number of SFF, crime, general fiction, and memoir pieces. His alternate history crime novel Making Wolf from Rosarium Publishing was released in September, 2015.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2445 KB
  • Print Length: 298 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1937009297
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Apex Book Company (14 Nov. 2016)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01N8VTS76
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #337,892 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
An alien invasion thriller like no other, which blends gangland grit, espionage and science-fiction with Nigerian history and culture into a gripping and thought-provoking novel. The mechanisms for human telepathy and alien occupation are fresh and original, but below the surface of a fresh and exciting action-packed story is a genuinely involving psychological drama that explores what it is to be human, what it is to be alone, and what it is to spend a life of apathy and then be given something to live for and live up to, and to face up to the consequences of your past, present and future actions. Highly recommended.

(This review was given for Apex Publications in exchange for a free copy of the ebook)
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Format: Paperback
Rosewater by Tade Thompson is an amazing blend of cyperpunk, biopunk and spiritualism set in midst of a future Lagos. The main character, Kaaro, is an everyday man ‘infected’ with extraordinary abilities which eventually lands him a position with a government agency. The story that follows is one of the most original science fiction stories I’ve read in quite some time. Tade tells this tale in a way that keeps you guessing right up to the end, taking you on a journey that is well worth the time. Rosewater is a book that belongs in any true science fiction reader’s collection; Tade Thompson is at the forefront of African science fiction and a writer you need to keep your eye on.
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Format: Paperback
A complex, brilliant and visceral alien invasion scenario, with enough twists and turns to keep you dizzily guessing where - or when - to next. The novel's characters are rich and evolving, plot lines juggled as if mirroring a quantum reality - yet Thompson keeps you nailed down in each scene, with tactile and evocative prose. A wonderful book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Brilliant! A fascinating window into a future that is mesmerising. Tade Thompson delights with a unique voice that shares a disturbing yet unforgettable story.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind-Bending Novel That Immerses You Into Its Future World 18 Jun. 2017
By Michael A. Burstein - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rosewater is a mind-bending novel, one that will have you thinking about it over and again long after you put it down. Ostensibly a first contact story between humans and aliens, it's much more of an exploration of an unfamiliar future culture extrapolated from what I would assume is an unfamiliar present culture for most readers. It's very clear why this novel was shortlisted for the John Campbell Memorial Award.

If you've read other reviews of this novel here, you'll already have an idea of why this novel is so powerful. For me, though, it's the immersion into the world presented that makes the book work. Reading about Kaaro, who is one of the most powerful "sensitives" in this future version of Nigeria, is an intense experience, but he's just the right viewpoint character for the mystery and the world-building Tade Thompson presents. I highly recommend this book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind blown! 28 Feb. 2017
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Was so good I could taste the ectoplasm. I loved the descriptions of the places and aliens, the writing jumps through time a bit which was a pain to track but it was worth it.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly original, honest, brutal science fiction 27 Jan. 2017
By Ashley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Rosewater is one of the most original science fiction works that I have ever read. It is a first-contact narrative set in Nigeria that weaves elements of cyberpunk with gritty realism and intelligent science. Recommended, and even more recommended if you are tired of homogeneously crewed spaceships or utopias without toilets.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I would recommend it for fans of the Southern Reach trilogy 26 Jan. 2017
By kinsey_m - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a highly original SF story. I would recommend it for fans of the Southern Reach trilogy.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic blend of science fiction meets postcolonial neo-noir 18 Feb. 2017
By Chris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
In the near future, an alien object has appeared outside of Lagos, Nigeria—an alien dome blocks out entry and creates the mystery of what’s held inside, as a shantytown springs up around it. At different intervals, the dome opens just enough to emit “healing” powers which manifest in strange and inhuman ways, creating small groups of misshapen but “cured” individuals. It’s also created the sensitives, those with a kind of telepathic power which allows them to manipulate or read the minds of others or to tap into the xenosphere, a shared consciousness dream-world. People continued to flock to that shantytown until it became Rosewater, a gritty but booming city here in the late 2060s.

Kaaro was a thief as a child and a sensitive as an adult. His day job is working at a bank, reading classical fiction in the xenosphere as a kind of living firewall to prevent intrusions. His night job is working for Section 45, an elite group of secret government agents who use their sensitive skills to interrogate suspects and keep tabs on known criminal enterprises. Kaaro’s listless life starts to pick up when he starts dating a woman named Aminat, until it’s thrown upside-down by changes within Section 45 and a sickness that seems to be killing off sensitives. As the narrative jumps between Kaaro’s present and his past—from his life of crime to his first S45 investigation of the nomadic activist called Bicycle Girl—the secrets uncovered in Kaaro’s past may also be keys to divining his future. If only he can stay alive…

There’s a lot in Rosewater that will attract the attention of SF fans—the blending of post-cyberpunk/biopunk elements with a “first contact” story; the creative depiction of these alien invaders; the mysteriously isolationist United States (that’s not timely at all). And it had enough strong spy-thriller/neonoir elements to attract my interest. But what made the novel stand out so vividly to me was its setting. Science fiction doesn’t have the best track record of putting “foreign” works in the US genre market, and it’s only been a decade or so that SF written by African writers has become readily available. So there’s still a kind of exotic uniqueness from Thompson’s knowledgeable depiction of Nigerian peoples and customs, and that perspective makes a first contact story with a heavy postcolonial bent much more poignant. Most of Africa has had firsthand experience with “alien” cultures occupying land and indoctrinating culture, and making that connection sharpens every one of the novel’s implications.

And it’s that evocative, gritty, and utterly realistic backdrop that makes the novel so effective and immersive. Thompson has a wonderful writing style and sense of plotting that makes Rosewater an engaging read; it’s a book where the dense and layered plot is presented in such a way that you want to keep reading, to see more and more secrets unraveled. And the well never runs dry on Thompson’s fascinating characters or brilliant concepts. The characters and beings mutated by the biological, fungal-like alien infection start to sound ludicrous or comic book-esque—Bicycle Girl, who stole away an entire village across space and time; Aminat’s brother Layi, who bursts into flames on occasion and has to be chained to the house so he doesn’t float away; the dead Reanimates brought back by the dome’s healing rays. But trust me when I say all of these far-out and divergent plot elements are melded into smart, capable, and mature narrative. And as much as the alien invasion grabs your attention, first and foremost it’s a story about people, focused on its very human characters.

Rosewater is a unique and compelling vision, one of the most distinctive science fiction novels in recent times. It takes everything you knew about the “first contact” and “alien invasion” themes and inverts them into a radical new postcolonial perspective. Lavie Tidhar blurbed that Rosewater is “reminiscent at times of both Roger Zelazny and Nnedi Okorafor” and I think that sums up the strengths of the novel, its literary weirdness and neocolonialist metaphor. It is the hardboiled Nigerian SF novel I didn’t know I needed, and now can’t do without, confirming that I need to read Thompson’s Making Wolf later this year. I’ll be very disappointed if Rosewater doesn’t get some critical acknowledgement—perhaps it’s not commercial enough for most SF awards, but it ought to be in contention. Tade Thompson has written a fantastic novel, one that I enjoyed every minute of reading, and it has my highest recommendation.
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