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Byrds

3.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (25 Jan. 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra
  • ASIN: B000006XCK
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 63,297 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It was fashionable at the time of release ('73) to criticise this album, and it's still fashionable now. However, not everybody preferred the Byrds in their 'Sweetheart of the Rodeo' or 'Farther Along' incarnations, and this album was awaited with drooling anticipation by those who thought McGuinn's best comrades in arms were Gene Clark or David Crosby, or (preferably) both.
Clark, especially, shines on this album, and his self-penned contributions echo his 'Roadmaster' album, which had pretty much the same line-up on a couple of tracks. Crosby, blowing hot and cold as he always did, weighs in with two gems - 'Laughing' and Joni's 'For Free' - which balance the extremely odd 'Long Live The King'.
There have also been criticisms of the Neil Young covers, and I confess that 'Cowgirl' isn't the greatest, but '(See The Sky) About To Rain' is the jewel in the crown of the entire album. Those Rickenbacker power chords are what the Byrds were all about, and still give me the chills thirty years on.
Don't think of it as 'Farther Along' without Clarence White (although if you fancy hearing the estimable CW on Gene's 'Full Circle' then you'll find him on the abovementioned 'Roadmaster'), think of it as 'McGuinn Clark & Hillman' with David Crosby. 'The Byrds' is well worth its place in your collection, whatever you've heard.
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Format: Audio CD
Everyone was expecting (1) the "classic" Byrds sound and (2) another Younger Than Yesterday/Notorious Byrds Brothers. Hence the howls of disappointment on its release. In 1973 the "classic" Byrds sound wasn't yet retro-cool, and would just have sounded dated; the album's general flavour is more redolent of CSNY with a pinch of country. The original five hadn't played together for six years, during which time they'd trod very disparate musical paths, and it'd have taken them at least two albums to return to form, which never happened. It has its faults. Crosby dominated the proceedings, something he now admits and regrets, and his production is indifferent. You feel that only Gene Clark brought really strong songs to the table- McGuinn admitted he didn't, Hillman's are slight, Crosby serves up one cover, one reworking and a mediocre original. Hillman's bass work is disappointingly unremarkable given his upfront and innovative presence on those 1966-7 Byrds albums ; McGuinn's Rickenbacker is held well down in the mix. That said, the harmonies are intact if occasionally sketchy, Hillman adds some nice mandolin touches, the reading of Crosby's Laughing is worthwhile for the 12-strings (McGuinn essays some `raga' phrases), Clark's material is very good, and the closing cover of Neil Young's See The Sky About To Rain, on which he takes lead (although maybe it should have been McGuinn) is the standout track by some distance- strangely it doesn't get picked for the compilations. Minor, but by no means bad. Prime candidate for an expanded remaster/remix?
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There were very high hopes for this album prior to its original release. McGuinn had helped to fuel this sense of anticipation some months earlier by telling a jounalist that the new album would "continue where 'The Notorious Byrd Brothers' had left off.". When 'Byrds' finally appeared it seemed as segmented as the latter day Byrds' Columbia albums and had little of that remarkably unified sound that had been the hallmark of the same lineup between 1965 and 1967. I would however urge prospective buyers not to be put off as the reputation of this album has improved during the period since. The two Gene Clark compositions ('Full Circle' and 'Changing Heart') have become classics and are worth the price of admission alone. McGuinn's 'Sweet Mary' is in the style of a traditional folk song and features some excellent mandolin and acoustic guitar. Neil Young's (then unreleased) 'See the Sky About to Rain' sees some stunning 12 string guitar work, great harmony and the kind of Gene Clark vocal that we would hear from him on 'No Other' the following year. David Crosby is very much in his element as a harmony singer - especially on 'Cowgirl in the Sand' and the version of his own composition 'Laughing' contains enough of McGuinn's Rickenbacker raga sound to render its inclusion worthwhile. And don't forget that there is an astonishing outtake from this album -'My New Woman' on McGuinn's self titled solo album from a few months later.
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By A Customer on 17 May 2003
Format: Audio CD
Don't be fooled, this is not a bad album:
-The Gene Clark tracks are fantastic, and his country tinged Neil Young covers are great.
-Crosby's contributions are mixed: his rendition of Joni Mitchell's 'For Free'is really good, but the rest uninspiring, especially his strange decision to do a sloppy version of 'laughing', a song he had cut on his solo album to much greater effect.
- McGuinn's work is mixed too: 'sweet mary' is folky gem, but the likes of 'rock n' roll' is dire.
- I have great respect for the mans talent, but Hillmans contributions are dire, apart from some brilliant mandolin breaks on Clark and McGuinn's songs.
In short, Good not Great
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