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Ender's Game [Blu-ray]

3.8 out of 5 stars 737 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Asa Butterfield, Abigail Breslin, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Viola Davis
  • Directors: Gavin Hood
  • Format: PAL, Blu-ray
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Entertainment One
  • DVD Release Date: 10 Mar. 2014
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (737 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00AW9MB4W
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,444 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

Product Description

Big-budget sci-fi starring Asa Butterfield and Ben Kingsley. When an alien race known as the Formics attack Earth, the International Fleet prepare for their next attack by recruiting the most intelligent children on Earth and training them to lead the inevitable battle. Split up from his family and taken to the Fleet's Battle School, Ender Wiggin (Butterfield) quickly makes a name for himself as the best recruit of his generation with abilities even surpassing those of the legendary war hero Mazer Rackham (Kingsley). As his reputation grows and Ender continues to impress his peers, he is expected to be Earth's only hope against the alien race. But with the Formics preparing for their next move, will Ender finish his training in time to lead his people to victory as anticipated?

From the Back Cover

In the near future, a hostile alien race have attacked Earth. If not for the legendary heroics of International Fleet Commander, Mazer Rackham (Ben Kingsley), all would have been lost. In preparation for the next attack, Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and the International Military are training only the best young children to find the future leader. Ender Wiggin (Asa Butterfield), a shy, but strategically brilliant boy is pulled out of his school to join the elite. Arriving at Battle School, Ender quickly and easily masters increasingly difficult war games, distinguishing himself and winning respect amongst his peers. Ender is soon ordained by Graff as the military's next great hope, resulting in his promotion to Command School. Once there, he's trained by Mazer Rackham, himself, to lead his fellow soldiers into an epic battle that will determine the future of Earth and save the human race.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
So-so sci-fi, about child military recruits, trained to fight an alien race.

Asa Butterfield is a fine actor, but utterly fails to convince as the lead here. Maybe it's just the part of a child becoming a high ranking leader in the proceedings, that just didn't work for me. His main expression throughout the film, seemed to only be one of a rabbit caught in the headlights.

Harrison Ford fares better, as Colonel Graff (or should that be gruff?), and seems to treat things as a warm up to his return as Han Solo.

Ben Kingsley, sports a hilarious Maroi facial tattoo, and an even more comical Kiwi accent. A total throwaway.

Very cg heavy, some impressive, some not so much.

The ending (kinda) saved the third act for me. I didn't see it coming, and things are left open for a sequel (it's the first adaptation of a best selling trilogy). It likely won't happen due to lacklustre box office though.

The picture quality was outstanding, despite the film's shortcomings.

The Audio quality surprises by not being particularly bass heavy. It features a fair bit of aerial combat, which just isn't as immersive as it should be.

Film 5.5/10
PQ 9/10
AQ 7/10
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A very disappointing film adaptation of a brilliant book. At the same time, an okay SF film. The graphics and effects worked well enough and I liked Ben Kingsley as Mazer Rackham. The book is something special though and so many of the changes have spoiled things. The children were all too old. In the book, Ender is only five when he goes to Battle School and the training took years so that by the end he is only nine or ten. Also Bean was from an even later launch group. Both of these changes make the sequels I'd love to see (Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide, and Children of the Mind) as well as paraquels such as the Shadow series next to impossible and that's a shame because I would love to see Virlomi's one-woman conquest of India as a film.

So... as a film it's okay, as an adaptation of the book, it's awful.
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By grimboj on 27 May 2017
Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
I first watched this film before I'd read the book, I would have given it 2-3 stars, it was shallow and unmemorable. I was blown away by the book, best book I've ever read, so I thought I'll try the film again. To me it seems that the conversion from book to film is the problem, the characters lost ALL depth, all character development in trampled through, half a dozen chapters of book are compressed to 5 minutes of screen time in several places. They did a really bad job of covering that up, there are entire scenes that don't make sense because they skipped every part of the book that would have explained them. Ender is a very mature, troubled character in the book but he comes across as immature and moody in the film. Parts of the plot were rewritten to dumb it down and the end result is for the worse.

I will explain in more depth below.

******SPOILERS FOLLOW*****

The film cast an ender that is 13 but ender is 7. Because of this they dropped all references to the age gap between him and his classmates, by the end of the film he is suppose to be 5-7 years younger than his peers. He is taller than kids that are suppose to be nearly double his age in the film.

Ender is a cold killer, I do not know why they wrote this out of the film. Peter is a murderer, they wrote that out of the film and turned him into the bad kid from toy story. Enders concern about his own kills make no sense out of context.

When Ender is taking a Hiatus, the film fails to explain why, they don't even mention that he's at mazer rackmans house or that he built the raft to avoid prying eyes, the scene makes no sense whatsoever as a result.

Ender is suppose to be really horrible to his team but he cuddles them.
Read more ›
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Usually I like I good existentialist or surrealist drama with subtitles but I do like the occassional sci fi although it is hard to find true quality in the genre. This was not perfect but was very good - maybe a 9/10 but I preferred a 5 to a 4. With a veneer of a sci fi military thriller this is really a complex ethical philosophical drama. The scenes of contact are very moving. Lessons apply to not only how we deal with other cultures and other species but how we deal with our own species in the face of the unknown. Fear is a powerful emotion and can drive very destructive forces. The militarisation of children is one of them - it happens all over the world. Recruitment in some cultures is brutal and physical with children not even in double figures in age carrying real weapons. In the west it is cloaked in war games and military recruitment advertisements. Enlistment in the UK begins before children are even legally able to vote. The very end was probably the most important and took little of the film but ideas of ecological harmony are embedded. Willful destruction of things we do not understand can often come back to haunt us but even without the idea of blowback a genuine respect and humility in the light of other beings is important. We are not the most important thing in our neighbourhood, in our fields, our mountains, our atmosphere, our planet, or the universe. We are transient expressions of life. Nothing more. Yet so often we often seem intent on being transient expressions of death.
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