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The Last Family In England Paperback – 6 May 2004

3.8 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

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Paperback, 6 May 2004
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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape (6 May 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224072773
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224072779
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 2.2 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 495,590 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

'A comic tour de force... Haig has pulled off the difficult feat of sustaining a joke right the way through' -- The Times, 22nd May 2004

'An enjoyable modern-day fable... Touching, funny and unique' -- The List, May 2004

'Haig pulls it off stylishly and unsentimentally' -- Observer, 23rd May 2004

'So multi-faceted it could be re-read time and again... This is a remarkable book and a brilliantly entertaining read' -- The Big Issue, May 2004

'This debut novel is a winner from page one... It is perceptive, enchanting and destined to be this summer's must-read' -- Mail on Sunday, 16th May 2004

Clearly destined to become a cult hit. I only wish my dog had thought of it first. -- Daily Mail, 7th May 2004

Extremely funny... One of the most enjoyable books you could read this year. -- Waterstones Books Quarterly, Spring 2004

Highly engrossing, hilarious yet heart-breaking. -- Ink magazine, May 2004

The view of humans through the eyes of a dog is intriguing. -- OK! magazine, 1st May 2004

Book Description

'I love this book. It's fabulous and moving and funny and strange. It will go down among the great animal books' Jeanette Winterson --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A story with a unique perspective, of a disrupted family life, told brilliantly by the Families pet dog. There are great insights and dark points throughout the book, but fresh angle of seeing things from this viewpoint is what really steps things up for this story.

This was the second book from the author i read, after i picked up The Possession of Mr Cave. I have since read others and I find it so engaging that Matt Haig can write so well about the delicate nature of mental health and show that it really is an issue that can affect anyone and everyone.
I have since read The Humans and i am looking forward to reading more from Matt Haig.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very depressing story
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Format: Paperback
4.5 stars

Prince is a Labrador intent on following the 'code', to protect his Family, to use his canine wiles to do his duty and watch out for them.

Tutored by an older Lab, tempted by a Spaniel into breaking the code, Prince does his best to protect the Hunter family as potential marital strife and teenager issues threaten to tear them apart - but can he do anything?

The point-of-view of the dog is well considered, and we get the best of both worlds, seeing Adam and Kate's marriage through his eyes as well as their own.

There's mystery at the heart of the story, as well as some quite dark issues within the Hunter family. With some twists to uncover, I enjoyed the Shakespearian connection too - Henry, Prince and Falstaff - all made it seem as though tragedy and death were possible, just around the corner.

The story culminates in a few shocking episodes, and ends on a rather bittersweet note, but one I felt entirely appropriate.

It's a great read, might be quite upsetting for dog lovers, but a wonderful early work from a rather big name contemporary writer. I read this as a fan of Haig's other adult and children's books and was not disappointed.
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By L. H. Healy TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
I bought this book many moons ago and it has been sitting on my bookshelf ever since, waiting patiently, and every so often I would think about reading it and then think, not now, maybe soon. I finally picked it up to read on holiday and I'm very glad I did. It tells of Prince, a young dog who strives to fulfill the Labrador Pact, taking care of his human family, but despite his efforts things begin to go wrong, and he must look again at his behaviour. I loved that Prince was the first person narrator of this story! This is a marvellous, clever and very readable yet layered story, a perceptive, memorable novel that was this author's debut.

I can't believe I haven't actually read a book by Matt Haig until now; I've also got The Radleys and The Humans waiting to be read now and I intend to get to them much more quickly than I did this one.
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Format: Paperback
This book is written in a style that any dog owner will empathise with, especially Labrador owners. Describing the world through the eyes of a dog is very hard to get right without sounding cliched but Matt Haig succeeds where others have failed. A truly engrossing experience. The Last Family in England is simply a great read and as someone who has to read lots of dog books every week this is one occassion when it was genuinely a pleasure not a chore. One of those rare publications that grab you from page one right to the final cover. I'd give it 5 paws if I could by 5 stars will do it justice.
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Format: Paperback
The last family in England live in a world where the dogs, cats and squirrels all talk to one another. What is more they understand everything we humans say. But we don't understand them, except when we are completely plastered, in which case we have forgotten all about it the following day.

Prince is the young Labrador, eager to learn everything from his earnest mentor, the older dog Henry. He preaches the Labrador code. Look after the family for the family is everything. Yet as you might expect all is not as it might seem, and soon Prince is making decisions that he might not have made for himself, decisions that will come back to haunt him.

This book made me laugh out loud several times and any book that can do that, is all right in my book. But there is also sadness there as you might expect. Along the way there is a little nod in the direction of Animal Farm as the pace rattles along relentlessly. In some ways it is a children's book but definitely not for children, its colourful language dictates that, as does the story line.

I found it a very easy book to read, though it is 340 pages, and finished it in a matter of days. Tackling the Last Family in England was well worth the effort, I really enjoyed it and would definitely recommend it to anyone looking for a good and quick read, and hoping to find moments of humour.

The Last Family in England.
By Matt Haig
ISBN: 009946845X
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Format: Paperback
A new look at life through a dog's eyes, the responsibilities, and worries of the role. A compulsive read but sometimes disturbing and left me with a sense of loss even though from the outset you know the ending. This book will leave you with a different view of your family pet.
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Format: Paperback
It took me a long time to get into this and I nearly gave up. My husband said I should continue and he was right! I liked it in the end and was glad I persevered but it is not going to stand out as a favourite read for this year, guess that is probably why it sat so long on our bookshelves before I selected it for the Letter L in the A - Z Title Challenge.

I am an animal lover but I definitely prefer cats to dogs so I did not find it easy to empathise with the narrator of the story 'Prince' who just happens to be a Labrador Retriever. Prince feels responsible for his human family and he cares for them under the rules of ' The Labrador Pact' as he struggles to save the family from being broken up by outside influences.

The Shakespeare quotes before the novel starts, within plus characters names led me to recognise that the author is using some of the situations from the History Plays Hamlet and Henry IV. Although to be honest I never really understood the reasoning beyond showing us that Prince in his efforts to save his family will put his own life under threat.

Written as humorous fiction I did actually find it rather sad. The issues covered are serious ones, love, commitment to our families and dealt with in a way that I found difficult to relate to. Matt Haig's style of humour may not appeal to me in this novel, very much although I did laugh. His writing is without a doubt very clever and it is definitely worth reading for that reason alone.
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