FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
I Am No One has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 6 Million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Over 6 Million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

I Am No One Paperback – 2 Feb 2017

3.3 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£4.03 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£8.99 FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books; Main edition (2 Feb. 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1782397981
  • ISBN-13: 978-1782397984
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 172,298 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

A passionate, gripping, brilliantly voiced and scintillatingly intelligent novel about that cancer afflicting modern democratic states - the surveillance of its own people. Were we ever told that democracy would entail this? I Am No One will get under your skin, leave you jittery and unsettled, and have you looking over your shoulder. -- Neel Mukherjee, author of THE LIVES OF OTHERS, shortlisted for the Man Booker and the Costa Novel Awards 2014 and won the Encore Award 2015 Flanery is a master of puzzling, alarming and even terrifying storytelling. -- A.S Byatt Guardian [Flanery is] gloriously talented The Guardian - fiction highlights for 2016 [A] superbly entertaining novel... a brilliant work of suspense... Its relevance today is without question, and its du jour subject matter is persuasively treated. TLS A hotly contemporary novel by a critically acclaimed American novelist about creeping paranoia in an age of mass surveillance. The Independent: 'Best of 2016' A masterful plot, a terrifying subject, and a gripping read. Independent on Sunday Patrick Flanery pulls off a rarity in the age of compartmentalized fiction: a novel of Pynchonesque paranoid ideas, wrapped in psychologically acute Jamesian prose, delivered by a gripping story worthy of Graham Greene. I Am No One is itself profoundly observant about the post-Snowden culture of surveillance, and the insights of this unsettling novel are ignored at our own peril. -- Teddy Wayne This is such a superb, addictive, startling read that it seeps into your psyche. Read I Am No One and look around you with trepidation at our post-Edward Snowden world. The Herald Disquieting... compelling -- Lucy Daniel Daily Telegraph [Flanery is] the author of [three] thoughtful, meticulously written and slow burning thrillers -- Gerard Woodward Independent I Am No One is a tremendous work of fiction. Its long, elegant sentences and intellectual inquisitiveness are reminiscent at times of Philip Roth, at others of European masters like Alberto Moravia... a brilliant novel that works equally as espionage thriller, cautionary warning, socio-political j'accuse and-most rewardingly for me-existential meditation -- Darragh McManus Independent (Ireland) One of the pleasures of reading Flanery is the tussle between ways of understanding the shapes of stories and language... he writes realist novels which show their awareness that realism is a self-conscious form like others. Guardian Superb... a brilliant novel that works equally as spy thriller, social commentary; and an existential meditation. Belfast Telegraph A smart, chilling novel Metro

Book Description

Set in the post-Snowden era of creeping surveillance of ordinary citizens and everyday life, I Am No One explores how a world without privacy is a world without freedom of expression. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By MisterHobgoblin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Jun. 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jeremy O’Keefe is an American academic, specialising in 20th century German history. Very specifically, he is an expert in state surveillance in East Germany. He has recently taken up a chair at New York University after a decade in exile in what he perceived to be the rural backwater of Oxford.

One morning, he goes to a coffee shop expecting to meet one of his doctoral students. Instead, he finds himself stood up, much to the amusement of a young man who has stopped by for a coffee. But on getting home, it turns out that Professor O’Keefe has rescheduled the appointment and received an e-mail confirmation from the student – none of which he remembers. Oh, and Professor O’Keefe receives a courier delivery of a print out of every web address he has ever visited. Did Professor O’Keefe print this out and send it to himself? Has Professor O’Keefe started to blank out parts of his memory? His well connected daughter is worried enough to direct him to a neurologist…

What unfolds is a tense story of intrigue in the present, interspersed with a gradual unpacking of what, precisely, happened in Oxford. It is a dense text; deeply introspective and with a tendency towards academic logorrhoea. Basically, Professor O’Keefe never really gets to the point.

For the most part, it is well done. The reader is kept guessing; the characters feel real; the settings feel authentic. In particular, Flanery captures the backbiting world of academia, seldom producing real insight and mostly just cranking the handle of a machine that processes many students and occasionally produces new academics. Flanery captures the strange world of Oxford colleges perfectly, a world of ridiculous tradition and disdain for anything remotely worldly.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a series of extended essays on the topics of loneliness and paranoia.
I am insistent on interspersing brief passages of dialogue with many pages of tedious, superfluous backstory.
I am pompous, I am humourless, I am slow to start and I am showing no signs of improving by page 150.
I am not worth your time.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Absolute tosh. This tedious book is written by an American driven by stereotypes, his descriptions of London and Oxford are stupefyingly wrong. The characters are obvious and mostly banal. The plot travels like a sloth in need of a hip replacement. I can't recall reading more overrated and disappointing drivel.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Interesting read which is not very predictable. I kept on reading as I was very intrigued with where the story would go next. I would recommend but beware it can get a little slow in places.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While I liked the plot, albeit a rather slow one, the real spoiler for me was the lack of full stops and everlasting paragraphs. This author needs to take a break. Sentences lasting one hundred to a hundred and fifty words make for a very tedious read making it feel more of that of a shopping list than a novel. Disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It is a little bit on the slow side, but i think it can happen.
good read, really
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Hugely disappointing. Starts intriguingly but just peters out without much having happened along the way. Broadly, an American professor returns to New York after ten years in Oxford. He's long divorced from his first wife, he picks up with his daughter, now a powerful Manhattanhite. And then strange things keep happening: packages of data usage details delivered, the same person turning up too often to be a coincidence. He gets a bit paranoid and, really, that's about it.

About 300 pages in, I realised that there was no super twist to come, we knew what we knew and that was going to be it, and a feeling of being duped would set in. I never felt any great sympathy for the main character. Some of the bit players are difficult to believe in: the other American professor in Oxford might be a spy, he might be in a relationship with the Egyptian brother of Fadia, the latter a student of our professor, the former might be a terrorist.

There are bits of the writing that are nteresting: some wry observations on being American in the UK, how he's received as British on return to the US. But at what length: 20 line sentences are not uncommon which certainly don't add to the understanding. Perhaps the point is how easy it is for relatively innocent activity to act as a red flag for security services and, how, once in their net, you can't readily escape. But I think I knew that.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Jeremy O’Keefe is a professor of German history at New York University. He’s recently returned to the United States after 10 years teaching at Oxford; he wants to be closer to his grown daughter and his mother. And he’s also dealing with cultural dislocations. To his American friends and colleagues, he sounds British, just as to his British friends and colleagues he always sounded like an American. He’s both, and neither.

He has an appointment with one of his graduate students to discuss her paper; he arrives on time at a local coffee shop, but the student is a no-show. A young man sitting nearby observes that it appears his date didn’t show up. Later, when he checks his email, he discovers an email from himself telling the student to reschedule, and a response from the student. He has no memory of either email.

Then the young man from the coffee shop shows up at a party given by Jeremy’s daughter and her husband. That’s followed by the arrival of the first of several boxes of printed lists of O’Keefe’s emails and online activity. He thinks he’s either losing his mind or someone is doing more than simply watching what he’s up to. His academic specialization in German history is the work of the Stasi, the East German secret police that flourished in the communist era, and he begins to wonder if his life is taking on aspects of his academic work.

“I Am No One” is Patrick Flanery’s third novel, and while it’s tempting to consider it a suspense novel, it actually falls in the genre of serious fiction. O’Keefe’s dilemma becomes an exploration of memory, privacy, and identity in the internet age, an age where threats can be vague and hidden, threatening people can turn out to be something else entirely, and one’s past can become intimately locked into one’s present.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse