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Fingerprints of the Gods: A Quest for the Beginning and the End Hardcover – 10 Apr 1995

4.5 out of 5 stars 185 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 578 pages
  • Publisher: William Heinemann Ltd; First Edition edition (10 April 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 043431336X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0434313365
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 16 x 5.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (185 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 70,671 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"I always wanted to do a biblical flood movie, but I never felt I had the hook. I first read about the Earth's Crust Displacement Theory in Graham Hancock's Fingerprints of the Gods."
Roland Emmerich, Director "2012" in an interview from Time Out London" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The Quest continues --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the last Ice Age.

But I do wish the book had been properly edited. It is full of repitition and is not presented in any sort of logical order. It could have been 30% shorter. Nevertherless well worth reading.
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Format: Paperback
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just because there are flaws in accepted Egyptology, that does not mean that a race of super humans built the pyramids.
Hancock raises some very good points, and finds fascinating correlations in the themes of ancient myth. Unfortunately the conclusions he comes up with leave many more questions than you were faced with in the first place, and seem a bit too far fetched to be totally credible. His opinions may point to a different truth than that accepted by the close minded members of the archeological and scientific community, but in taking things too far into the extreme he will not be taken as a credible source by those he seeks to challenge.
The ideas put forward left me with the same feelings I have when reading conspiracy theory websites or books - it all seems possible, but when all weighed up after the event it just all seems too unlikely to wholly believe.
FOTG was definitely an interesting read, but rather than changing my life, as others have stated, it just changed the way I view ancient prehistory and the way it is perceived by modern scholars.
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Format: Paperback
This is about the only book of its type which is convincing enough to leave you worried at the end of it! Without giving anything away, read this with an open mind and try and ignore the one fault ever-present in this author's work: his failure to employ a ruthless editor to trim out the fat and constant repetitions which mar the book's readability.
The theories and alternative explanations of past civilisations and climate change are so well argued that the book still gets five stars. If only Mr Hancock could control his own verbosity, it would merit a 6.
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Format: Paperback
To ask questions and seek for answers is a solely human trait - trait that lead to great discoveries and meteorite speed of technical and intellectual progress of modern times. However, to spread new knowledge and theories, if they contradict accepted conventions is equally difficult: it's a "prejudice" of all highly developed societies to acknowledge that their theories on creation and development of civilization might well be wrong or that it's finally time to doubt them. History numerously proves that it's easier to reject and ignore than to refute. This book can be rejected or its theories refuted, but it can't be silently ignored.
As the headline for this book I can mention author's words: "I'm just following the science where it leads me... If my findings are in conflicts with their theory about the rise of civilization then maybe it Ò time to re-evaluate that theory".
Indeed, some aspects of the book's topics (eternal questions of "who are we", "who were our ancestors", "what is the message of ancient civilizations", "what stands behind stupendous monuments of Incas, Mayas, Egyptians", "why ancient mythologies have so much in common", "are civilizations cyclic and are we heading for a disaster'' etc) made me wonder, some I didn't quite grasp (e.g. part on solar equinoxes and solstices, precessions of earth and ecliptic cycles), a few seemed to be a little farfetched, but overwhelming flow of new information made me eager to investigate further, to doubt the facts we usually read in textbooks and also to express support to the author by writing this.
It was a genuine pleasure for me to read a very comprehensible and persuasive account on travels, research and evidence Mr.
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By Ray Blake VINE VOICE on 29 July 2007
Format: Paperback
Whether you subscribe to Hancock's theories or not, there is no denying that this is an excellent read, thoroughly well-researched and written in an engaging and involving way.

Personally, I felt that the book should have sought to ask some of its questions without then feeling the need to speculate wildly to answer them. Nevertheless, it is a fascinating read and this new edition is worth the money even if you have the original.
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Format: Paperback
Hancock provides some rather exciting correlations between ancient South American and Egyptian cultures. He hopes to unite the cultures with a "missing link" which he fails to provide substantial evidence for. This, however, is not the main flaw of the book. Hancock can hardly be expected to provide concrete evidence for that lost civilization when he has located it on the frozen continent of Antarctica!
The tragic flaw of the book is his insistence on reckoning these ancient cultures with the astronomical phenomenon of procession. While it is a fact that ancient cultures used their knowledge to trace the heavens, it is doubtful that they had an advanced knowledge of procession. Deviating further from possibility, Hancock insists that ancient cultures used the language of procession to make their mark in history. Finally, if you use Hancock's own 'scientific' calculations, you will discover that the current processional cycle does not match with the cultural evidence he gives in the book.
It is an interesting book and not without merit. One must be reminded that it was written before the dawning of the year 2000 and has a forboding sense of the 'coming doomsday.' If nothing else, the book will at least promote further thought about our beginnings and the technology we have somehow forgotten.
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