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Company Hardcover – 17 Jan 2006

4.1 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 338 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday Books (17 Jan. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385514395
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385514392
  • Product Dimensions: 14.8 x 2.6 x 21.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 844,547 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

PRAISE FOR "JENNIFER GOVERNMENT
"
"Funny and clever . . . a kind of ad-world version of "Dr. Strangelove . . . [Barry] unleashes enough wit and surprise to make his story a total blast."
--"New York Times Book Review
"Barry capitalizes on the strengths of the characters and ends up creating a brilliant finale to a clever story."
--"USA Today
"The plot rockets forward on hyperdrive . . . fresh and very clever."
--"Boston Globe
"A wicked and wonderful satire . . . "Jennifer Government does just about everything right."
--"Washington Post Book World
"Extremely funny . . . Barry is a smart writer with a Cassandra's gift for dark-edged prognostication."
--"Time
"A riotous satirical rant . . . [its characters'] excesses . . . make Barry's world of unregulated corporate greed and unrelenting consumerism so frightening and funny."
--"Entertainment Weekly
"It's "Catch-22 by way of "The Matrix."
--"Kirkus Reviews
"A thoroughly modern tale in the tradition of George Orwell and Aldous Huxley."
--"Book

PRAISE FOR "JENNIFER GOVERNMENT
""
""Funny and clever . . . a kind of ad-world version of "Dr. Strangelove" . . . [Barry] unleashes enough wit and surprise to make his story a total blast."
--"New York Times Book Review
""Barry capitalizes on the strengths of the characters and ends up creating a brilliant finale to a clever story."
--"USA Today
""The plot rockets forward on hyperdrive . . . fresh and very clever."
--"Boston Globe
""A wicked and wonderful satire . . . "Jennifer Government" does just about everything right."
--"Washington Post Book World
"
"Extremely funny . . . Barry is a smart writer with a Cassandra's gift for dark-edged prognostication."
--"Time
"
"A riotous satirical rant . . . [its characters'] excesses . . . make Barry's world of unregulated corporate greed and unrelenting consumerism so frightening and funny."
--"Entertainment Weekly
""It's "Catch-22" by way of "The Matrix.""
--"Kirkus Reviews
"
"A thoroughly modern tale in the tradition of George Orwell and Aldous Huxley."
--"Book"

"Laugh-out-loud funny. . . . Superbly observed."
--"The Washington Post"
"Hilarious. . . . Barry underscores his credentials as both satirist and saboteur. . . . "Company" is Mr. Barry's breakout book."
--"The New York Times"
"Establishes Barry as one of the keenest and shrewdest minds in corporate satire... utterly original... A-."
--"Entertainment Weekly"
"Biting, hilarious. . . . For anyone who considers corporate life insane." --"People"

" Laugh-out-loud funny. . . . Superbly observed."
-- "The Washington Post"
" Hilarious. . . . Barry underscores his credentials as both satirist and saboteur. . . . "Company" is Mr. Barry's breakout book."
-- "The New York Times"
" Establishes Barry as one of the keenest and shrewdest minds in corporate satire... utterly original... A-."
-- "Entertainment Weekly"
" Biting, hilarious. . . . For anyone who considers corporate life insane." -- "People"

"Laugh-out-loud funny. . . . Superbly observed." --"The Washington Post""Hilarious. . . . Barry underscores his credentials as both satirist and saboteur. . . . "Company" is Mr. Barry's breakout book." --"The New York Times""Establishes Barry as one of the keenest and shrewdest minds in corporate satire... utterly original... A-."--"Entertainment Weekly""Biting, hilarious. . . . For anyone who considers corporate life insane." --"People"

Laugh-out-loud funny. . . . Superbly observed. "The Washington Post" Hilarious. . . . Barry underscores his credentials as both satirist and saboteur. . . . "Company" is Mr. Barry's breakout book. "The New York Times" Establishes Barry as one of the keenest and shrewdest minds in corporate satire... utterly original... A-. "Entertainment Weekly" Biting, hilarious. . . . For anyone who considers corporate life insane. "People""

Laugh-out-loud funny. . . . Superbly observed. The Washington Post Hilarious. . . . Barry underscores his credentials as both satirist and saboteur. . . . Company is Mr. Barry's breakout book. The New York Times Establishes Barry as one of the keenest and shrewdest minds in corporate satire... utterly original... A-. Entertainment Weekly Biting, hilarious. . . . For anyone who considers corporate life insane. People" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Max Barry began removing parts at an early age. In 1999, he successfully excised a steady job at tech giant HP in order to upgrade to the more compatible alternative of manufacturing fiction. While producing three novels, he developed the online nation simulation gameNationStates, as well as contributing to various open source software projects and developing religious views on operating systems. He did not leave the house much. ForMachine Man, Max wrote a website to deliver pages of fiction to readers via email and RSS. He lives in Melbourne, Australia, with his wife and two daughters, and is 38 years old. He uses vi.

" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 4 April 2016
Format: Paperback
I read a more recent book by the author some years ago, Lexicon, and really liked it. I thought this book looked like a good read. The premise of the ‘inside’ view of the modern workplace has been utilised to comic effect by other authors, to my recollection most notably in ‘e’ and ‘e2’ by Matt Beaumont.

In this book, we join Stephen Jones, as he starts his new role at Zephyr Holdings. He’s very keen to make a good impression, and really wants to fit into the corporate ethos and make his mark. His co-workers, Holly and Freddy seem very nice, and Jones, as he seems to be known as through the company, feels that this is going to be ‘the’ company to work for. Meanwhile Roger, Elizabeth and Wendell, the sales reps in the Training Sales Department where Jones works, are on the ball; selling, selling, selling. But who took Roger’s doughnut? Roger is determined to find out – no matter the cost – to anybody else, of course. Sydney Harper, the Training Sales Department Manager, keeps her door firmly closed, and her PA Megan watches the Training Sales Department staff from afar. But each and every one of these employees, and all the employees on all the other floors of the building, have their own hopes, and dreams, and fears. And it may be that Jones is about to find out what those are.

I liked this book; it was a witty, and satirical look at working for a faceless and anonymous company, where the employees feel they are on the treadmill, and small things like the loss of a doughnut become matters of political intrigue, backstabbing and general skullduggery. The loss of personal empowerment by the individual employees in such a workplace is, sadly all too real, but this book offers a rather funny and fresh look at it, and gives the reader an engaging read along the way. The narrative flows at a rapid pace, and Jones is a sympathetic character, who we really want to see succeed. Nicely written, and a rewarding light right.
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Format: Hardcover
Nestled among Seattle's skyscrapers, The Zephyr Holdings Building is a bleak rectangle topped by an orange-and-black logo that gives no hint of Zephyr's business. Lack of clarity, it turns out, is Zephyr's defining characteristic. The floors are numbered in reverse. No one has ever seen the CEO or glimpsed his office on the first (i.e., top) floor. Yet every day people clip on their ID tags, file into the building, sit at their desks, and hope that they're not about to be outsourced.
Stephen Jones, a young recruit with shoes so new they squeak, reports for his first day in the Training Sales Department and finds it gripped by a crisis involving the theft of a donut. In short order, the guilty party is identified and banished from the premises and Stephen is promoted from assistant to sales rep. He does his best to fit in with his fellow workers-among them a gorgeous receptionist who earns more than anyone else, and a sales rep who's so emotionally involved with her job that she uses relationship books as sales manuals-but Stephen is nagged by a feeling that the company is hiding something. Something that explains why when people are fired, they are never heard from again; why every manager has a copy of the Omega Management System; and most of all, why nobody in the company knows what it does.
Both of Max's last books kept me up reading into the wee early hours and I am hopping up and down in anticipation of his next General Smedley Butler'n adventure.
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By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 4 April 2016
Format: Paperback
I read a more recent book by the author some years ago, Lexicon, and really liked it. I thought this book looked like a good read. The premise of the ‘inside’ view of the modern workplace has been utilised to comic effect by other authors, to my recollection most notably in ‘e’ and ‘e2’ by Matt Beaumont.

In this book, we join Stephen Jones, as he starts his new role at Zephyr Holdings. He’s very keen to make a good impression, and really wants to fit into the corporate ethos and make his mark. His co-workers, Holly and Freddy seem very nice, and Jones, as he seems to be known as through the company, feels that this is going to be ‘the’ company to work for. Meanwhile Roger, Elizabeth and Wendell, the sales reps in the Training Sales Department where Jones works, are on the ball; selling, selling, selling. But who took Roger’s doughnut? Roger is determined to find out – no matter the cost – to anybody else, of course. Sydney Harper, the Training Sales Department Manager, keeps her door firmly closed, and her PA Megan watches the Training Sales Department staff from afar. But each and every one of these employees, and all the employees on all the other floors of the building, have their own hopes, and dreams, and fears. And it may be that Jones is about to find out what those are.

I liked this book; it was a witty, and satirical look at working for a faceless and anonymous company, where the employees feel they are on the treadmill, and small things like the loss of a doughnut become matters of political intrigue, backstabbing and general skullduggery. The loss of personal empowerment by the individual employees in such a workplace is, sadly all too real, but this book offers a rather funny and fresh look at it, and gives the reader an engaging read along the way. The narrative flows at a rapid pace, and Jones is a sympathetic character, who we really want to see succeed. Nicely written, and a rewarding light right.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
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By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 4 April 2016
Format: Paperback
I read a more recent book by the author some years ago, Lexicon, and really liked it. I thought this book looked like a good read. The premise of the ‘inside’ view of the modern workplace has been utilised to comic effect by other authors, to my recollection most notably in ‘e’ and ‘e2’ by Matt Beaumont.

In this book, we join Stephen Jones, as he starts his new role at Zephyr Holdings. He’s very keen to make a good impression, and really wants to fit into the corporate ethos and make his mark. His co-workers, Holly and Freddy seem very nice, and Jones, as he seems to be known as through the company, feels that this is going to be ‘the’ company to work for. Meanwhile Roger, Elizabeth and Wendell, the sales reps in the Training Sales Department where Jones works, are on the ball; selling, selling, selling. But who took Roger’s doughnut? Roger is determined to find out – no matter the cost – to anybody else, of course. Sydney Harper, the Training Sales Department Manager, keeps her door firmly closed, and her PA Megan watches the Training Sales Department staff from afar. But each and every one of these employees, and all the employees on all the other floors of the building, have their own hopes, and dreams, and fears. And it may be that Jones is about to find out what those are.

I liked this book; it was a witty, and satirical look at working for a faceless and anonymous company, where the employees feel they are on the treadmill, and small things like the loss of a doughnut become matters of political intrigue, backstabbing and general skullduggery. The loss of personal empowerment by the individual employees in such a workplace is, sadly all too real, but this book offers a rather funny and fresh look at it, and gives the reader an engaging read along the way. The narrative flows at a rapid pace, and Jones is a sympathetic character, who we really want to see succeed. Nicely written, and a rewarding light right.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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