Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
Dispatched from and sold by BUDGETPRICES.
£25.62 + £1.26 UK delivery
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by musicMagpie
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Faust [DVD] [1926]

4.8 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

Additional DVD options
Amazon Price
New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
£25.62
£25.30 £7.99
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Dispatched from and sold by BUDGETPRICES.
£25.62 Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by BUDGETPRICES.

Frequently bought together

  • Faust [DVD] [1926]
  • +
  • Metropolis [Reconstructed & Restored] (Masters of Cinema) [DVD] [1927]
  • +
  • Nosferatu (2013 Restoration) [Masters of Cinema] [DVD]
Total price: £43.84
Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Actors: Gösta Ekman, Emil Jannings, Camilla Horn, Frida Richard, William Dieterle
  • Directors: F.W. Murnau
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: German
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Eureka
  • DVD Release Date: 21 Jan. 2002
  • Run Time: 107 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005UBL5
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 103,076 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Product Description

DVD Special Features:

Commentary track written by film historian Peter Spooner
Black and White Silent with Orchestral Soundtrack
Music composed and conducted by Timothy Brock and performed by the Olympia Chamber Orchestra

From Amazon.co.uk

Shot in the UFA studios with a big movie star in the lead and all the special effects and production design resources any blockbuster of its time could wish for, FW Murnau's 1926 Faust represents a step up from his better-known Nosferatu. Oddly, Faust is a less familiar film than the vampire quickie and this release affords fans a chance to see what Murnau can do with an equally major fantasy story. Adapted neither from Marlowe's play Dr Faustus nor Goethe's verse drama, the script scrambles various elements of the legend and presents a Faust (Gosta Ekman) driven to summon the Devil by despair as a plague rages through the town, desperate to gain enough learning to help his neighbours. When this deal doesn't quite work out, because he is stoned by townsfolk who notice his sudden fear of the cross, Mephisto (Emil Jannings) offers Faust instead renewed youth and an opportunity to seduce a famously beautiful Italian noblewoman and then to return to his home village and get involved with the pure Gretchen (Camilla Horn). Like most versions of the story, it's episodic and some sections are stronger than others: the great stuff comes in the plague and initial deal sequences, though it picks up again for the tragic climax as Gretchen becomes the central figure and suffers horribly, freezing in the snows and burning at the stake. Jannings' devil, a gruesomely humorous slice of ham, is one of the great silent monster performances, reducing everyone else to a stick figure, and Murnau faces the challenge of topping his Nosferatu imagery by deploying a battalion of effects techniques to depict the many magical journeys, sudden appearances and transformations.

On the DVD: Often seen in ragged, incomplete prints projected at the wrong speed, this is a decently restored version, running a full 115 minutes with a complete orchestral score. The original materials show some of the damage to be expected in a film of its vintage, but the transfer is excellent, displaying the imaginative art direction and camerawork to superb advantage. Aside from a nicely eerie menu, the sole extra is a full-length commentary originating in Australia: written by historian Peter Spooner but read by narrator Russell Cawthorne (who mispronounces the odd name). This provides an interesting wealth of background detail, such as Murnau's attempt to cast Hollywood's Lillian Gish as Gretchen, and delivers a balanced assessment of the film itself. --Kim Newman

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
24
4 star
5
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 29 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I have to say that the more I delve deeper into these silent movies, the more I am impressed by the art direction, attention to detail and the over all quality of these movies. I bought Faust on the strength of Nosferatu and I have to say that I was most certainly not disappointed.

The first thing I will say about this film is how nicely simple the story is. The plot is pretty basic with some nice religious themes, love, betrayal and some more dark elements thrown into one big mixed bag. But the director has done a great job of taking these qualities and making it so easy to follow that the pacing was absolutely perfect.

My favourite thing about this movie is the visual element. There are a lot of heavy religious themes, most of which are fairly stereo typical old time Christianity. On top of that you have a fantastic intro sequence featuring the Devil and an Angel, this sequence alone is absolutely beautiful and had me taken back. The rest of the film features some beautiful set work all of which had a magnificent use of lighting. It didn't matter whether the set was made to look heavenly, devilish or to emphasise the look of death and decay, it looked absolutely gorgeous without, and all this is without mentioned some of the incredible visual effects sequences. Those are a sight to behold. Extremely impressive for the technical limitations of the day.

Those looking for a stunning fantasy movie about selling your soul to the devil, falling in love and reaping the consequences will absolutely adore this film. The bluray transfer whilst scratchy in places (it is 90 years old after all) still looks very sharp and is well suited to modern high definition television sets. I had an absolute blast with this movie and I couldn't recommend it more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Some years ago a good friend introduced me to Nosferatu, which I thoroughly enjoyed and consider to be a cinematic masterpiece. I determined to see more work from the same director, but have never got around to it now. I am glad I waited, as the Masters of Cinema series from Eureka is now allowing me to see these films in superb quality.

Faust is a dark tale of man's desires and the depths he can be driven to, tempered, ultimately with his capacity for self sacrifice and redemption.

The film opens with visually arresting images as the Devil Mephisto and an Angel lay a wager - if Mephisto can capture the soul of Faust, and turn the good Doctor to evil then he can lay claim to all the earth for his dominion. Mephisto starts a savage plague which Faust's science and faith cannot cure. In desperation he summons the Devil and seals a pact in his own blood, initially for the power to help the victims for a day. Cunningly Mephisto draws Faust ever deeper into his clutches, until, for the love of good woman he finds redemption.

The narrative is well known, but it is told in a fantastic and visually arresting fashion by Murneau, a master of his art. There are several big set pieces, especially at the beginning of the film, with some amazing special effects. Mephisto rising from a pit of fire, looking over the town spreading plague, the whole summoning sequence at the crossroads. These scenes are quite iconic, and leave one breathless with excitement and wonder.

Every scene is shot with meticulous attention to detail. The lighting for each is finely judged, and brings out the maximum impact and depth. The famous scene where the original Faustian pact is signed is a particular example; it is packed with immense emotion.
Read more ›
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
For many years F.W. Murnau's FAUST was known to me only through a few stills and a poster. About 15 years ago I came across a public domain video copy which had poor picture quality and Vivaldi's FOUR SEASONS as its soundtrack. Even with these handicaps I could tell that it was something very special and I longed for the day when I might see a better print of the film. A few years ago Kino International released a high quality DVD of FAUST with a newly commissioned score and I was ecstatic as I could now see the film close to the way it must have looked in 1926. Now Eureka has come out with this double DVD set which allows us for the first time to see the film the way Murnau intended. The Kino edition was based on the export version which differs in a number of ways from the original domestic version made available here. The biggest difference is in the way a number of scenes are treated. They are more expanded in the original and have a sharper picture quality than the export version. The ending of Faust and Gretchen ascending to Heaven is missing which seems rather strange as that is key to the film's theme of redemption through forgiveness. Thanks to this set you can view both versions and see the differences for yourself.

The performances especially by Emil Jannings as Mephistopheles and Camilla Horn as Gretchen are remarkable and the various special effects used are outstanding for the time and still have the power to astonish. As I said in an earlier review most silent film buffs think PANDORA'S BOX with Louise Brooks to be the apex of German silent cinema and maybe it is but I cast my vote for FAUST. Murnau was a true cinematic poet, a German Cocteau if you will, and all of his considerable skill as a cinematic storyteller went into the making of this film.
Read more ›
4 Comments 68 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews