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Eloge De L'amour [DVD] [2001]

3.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Bruno Putzulu, Cécile Camp, Jean Davy, Françoise Verny, Audrey Klebaner
  • Directors: Jean-Luc Godard
  • Writers: Jean-Luc Godard
  • Producers: Alain Sarde, Ruth Waldburger
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Optimum Home Releasing
  • DVD Release Date: 25 Mar. 2002
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000649FI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 76,587 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

Product Description

Jean-Luc Godard combines black and white celluloid with colour saturated digital video in this study of European life and culture at the end of the 20th century. Edgar (Bruno Putzulu) is a young man putting together an art project about the four stages of love. He meets a woman named Berthe (Cécile Camp) who seems to be perfect for the lead role, but she gives him the strange feeling that they might have met before. The film then flashes back to a period two years before, when Edgar visited Brittany and met an old couple who had been members of the Resistance and who were currently negotiating to sell their story to Steven Spielberg.

From Amazon.co.uk

Jean-Luc Godard's eagerly awaited Eloge de l'Amour was one of the highlights of the 2001 Cannes Film Festival, dividing critics between those who loved its extraordinary beauty and those who found it hard to discern an overall theme from a multitude of contending threads. Certainly the plot is elusive. A young writer (Bruno Putzulu) wants a dark-haired woman (Cecile Camp) to play a role in his evolving project, a study of the four stages of love: meeting, physical passion, separation and reconciliation. By the time the funding comes through, she has killed herself and he looks back to the time when he might, or might not have met her before.

Above all, the picture explores the blurred territory between the personal and the collective memory and the difference between a life which is simply lived and one in which the individual brings the power of imagination to their existence. Ultimately, the characters remain curiously faceless and the film fragments into a kaleidoscope of merging images, colours and landscapes and collective experience triumphs.

Godard's legendary status as the godfather of French New Wave cinema has long since passed into the realms of cliché. Here, the "present" is shot on the streets of Paris in black and white. Godard's city of light looks as timeless as it did back in 1966 when he made Masculin Feminin. The second part of the film is shot in digital video, absorbing the audience with its electrically intense, mesmerising colours.

Eloge de l'Amour is, more than anything, a sensual experience. Godard provokes but doesn't provide any answers. But fans of his more polemical work will enjoy the satirised American producers who want to purchase the rights to the Resistance couple's story. Americans have no memory, says the author. So they buy it from others. Godard never was a fence-sitter. --Piers Ford

On the DVD: the main DVD extra on this disc sounds enticing: an interview with one of the world’s most innovative and influential directors. Yet the reality is disappointing, as it’s merely a transcript. The biography is more of the same. The only other additional feature is the subtitles, though there’s no option to turn them off. --Nikki Disney

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
...and visually stunning. Godard's "Eloge De L'Amour" is all of these things. The film requires at least two viewings; I couldn't make head nor tail of it the first time I watched it as it has a reverse narrative, similar to Lynch's "Mulholland Drive". "Eloge" has no real plot as such ; it is more of a series of observations and philosophical musings on love, history, politics and art ,linked together vaguely by certain key phrases culled from writings from obscure intellectuals. It is a film of two halves; the first half is shot in monochrome in Paris and it takes place two years after the events of the latter half of the film, set in a Breton fishing village and filmed in an unusual colour-splashed digital video format (think David Bowie's "Ashes to Ashes" video). In Paris a young, high-brow film maker, Edgar, is auditioning for parts in an artistic "project" of his about the various ages and stages of love and ,in so doing, meets a girl whom he first met in Brittany several years before while doing research for another project. It was this encounter with her and her grandparents, who were leading figures in the French Resistance in WW2, that provided the inspiration for Edgar's current project. The film's strength is its visual appeal; there are lots of beautiful images and stylish imagery used throughout ,complemented by some haunting piano music. However it has several weaknesses that make it a difficult film to watch and enjoy; it is disjointed, thin on plot and the philosophical musings are very abstract and often inpenetrable.Read more ›
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Format: DVD
I will begin this review by stating that I am a very big admirer of Godard's earliest work. While I was completing A-level film studies there was an opportunity to research a subject of your choice as part of coursework. Without a trace of hesitation I chose to research Godard, the project having the convoluted title (don't laugh) 'The film aesthetic in the auteurial signature of Jean-Luc Godard during the French New Wave period'.

Godard, even in the early '60s, never cared for linear narratives or conventional dialogue. Roughly from 1968 onwards he has eschewed any element of narrative to construct 'film essays', assembling a melange of images and words that, apparently, when viewed on a number of occasions, all falls into place. 'Eloge de l'amour' is considered to be amongst the best of his later work.

Having sat through all this, I can quite simply say that it was not a pleasant experience. I find Godard's agenda snobbish and reactionary, simply there to flaunt his own superiority. Why attack Spielberg, the United States, imperialism, etc.? I am mystified by it all.

Godard's New Wave films include back-and-forth banter that works to great effect. In this film, again, conventional dialogue is put away with. This time I found it to be sophomoric and pretentious, making me cringe for the most part. There is no interaction as much as a series of loose, unconnected aphorisms.

A lot of his aesthetic has been to be unorthodox and 'radical', often using alternate camera angles and framing. Here, though, I became really flustered by characters constantly being filmed from their backs, elongated shots, random intertitles.
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Format: DVD
This is an interesting look at love, from a strange viewpoint, but still interesting. It does get a bit confusing at times, but the cinematography is worth it, Goddard going from picture to a black canvas within seconds, and the dialogue is distinguished and very profound. The strange thing is, Jean-Luc uses black and white for the present day and colour for the past, which was an interesting technique - it's like he wanted us to see the naked truth during the now.

This film will fascinate those who like social psychology and those who like a story which isn't easy to understand.

This DVD is poor, Optimum could have done better. One of my pet hates is "forced" subtitles, where you cannot turn them off. Being a native this annoys me, you should have the choice, sadly they don't give you this choice. At least there's a decent interview with Jean-Luc Goddard, but other than that it's what you see is what you get; I'm not even sure if this was presented in 4:3 originally anyway!

If you like nouveau vague cinema, and have the patience to sit through this, Goddard will reward you.
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Format: DVD
No quibble with the film itself, which is as thought-provoking and technically stunning as anything he's done to date. But Optimum Releasing have done a shoddy job of bringing it to DVD. The great beauty of DVD is the ability to switch subtitles on and off. Once non-French-speakers have watched this a couple of times, chances are they'll be happy to dispense with the subtitles, so that they don't intrude on the great soundtrack and ravishing images. Guess what? You can't turn 'em off. And, as Amazon says above, the "extras" are bare-bones too. Unfortunately, it will probably be an eternity before a better version is distributed, so for now that this will have to do. Full marks to JLG. Nil points to Optimum Releasing.
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