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Other Worlds: A Portrait of Nature in Rebellion- Space- Superspace- and the Quantum Universe Hardcover – 1 Jan 1980

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books (1 Jan. 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671422278
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671422271
  • Package Dimensions: 21.6 x 14.2 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,875,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book takes all the Physics knowledge you ever acquired, picks it to pieces, throws it out of the window and then reveals some concepts that will change the way you view time and space and Physics in general. Not only this, but it is all the more stunning (and sometimes scary) because many of the revelations are backed up by succesful experiment results. Buy this book now!
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Format: Paperback
Anyone with the most basic GCSE physics can grasp the mind blowing concepts in this book, and that is one of its strengths. Using analogy in the place of mathematics, the book presetns the latest developments in quantum mechanics, relativity, and everything else which usually gets yawns, in an interesting and detailed manner. A great buy!
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Format: Paperback
I read this book maybe a decade ago, but always remembered it. Inspiring and interesting read. Glad I managed to get hold of a copy :)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
These books are for my husband and he is reading them so they must be ok!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 9 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars The quantum universe in layman's terms 20 May 2013
By Tom Braun - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of my physicist Paul Davies' earlier books and is generally underrated, but it helped me finally understand both special relativity AND the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and I feel it deserves recognition for that. Maybe it doesn't cover all the latest and greatest in quantum physics, but it gives you a solid foundation for diving into books that do.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TRY IT 14 Feb. 2008
By GENE ADDINGTON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
ONE OF THE EASIEST BOOKS ON A DEEP SUBJECT THAT I HAVE RAN ACROSS

AND TRUST ME I HAVE TRIED QUITE A FEW. I CAME AWAY THANKFUL THAT

I FOUND A BOOK THAT EXPLAINS THEORY OF RELATIVITY SO I COULD AT

LEAST THINK I UNDERSTOOD IT. BUY THIS BOOK.

GENE ADDINGTON
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great collection of his essays 4 Aug. 2014
By CK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great collection of his essays. There are essays about writing stories ( The Lord of the Rings, fairy tales, etc), a little about the writing of the Narnia stories, and four science fiction stories are reprinted. There is also the transcript of a conversation he had with 2 other authors about writing. It's a great read!
5.0 out of 5 stars The quantum universe in layman's terms 20 May 2013
By Tom Braun - Published on Amazon.com
This is one of my physicist Paul Davies' earlier books and is generally underrated, but it helped me finally understand both special relativity AND the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and I feel it deserves recognition for that. Maybe it doesn't cover all the latest and greatest in quantum physics, but it gives you a solid foundation for diving into books that do.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Physics to Metaphysics: Probing the Universe to its Very Core 11 Jun. 2006
By John Philoponus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"Facing up to ... a superspace in which myriads of worlds are stitched together in a curious overlapping, wavelike fashion, the concrete world of daily life seems light years away. ... one is bound to wonder to what extent superspace is real." Paul Davies

Davies Temporal Gymnastics:

Paul Davies suggests that in a closed-time world, the past would also be the future. He thus opens up a prospect of temporal paradoxes, more frequently visited by science fiction writers, since H.G. Wells. But, if time joins up with itself similarly to a snake swallowing its tail, he proposes it would not be possible to distinguish forwards or backwards in time, just as he has explained, that there is no distinction between left and right hands in a Möbius-type space. Prof. Davies concludes, "Whether or not we would notice such bizarre properties of time is not clear. Perhaps our brains, in an attempt to order our experiences in a meaningful way, would be unaware of these temporal gymnastics."

Holes with Teeth?

As a Mathematical physicist, he expresses his Möbius-style thoughts, "Although edges and holes in space and time might seem like a mad mathematician's nightmare, they are taken very seriously by physicists, who consider that such structures may very well exist. Although there is no evidence for the mangling of space-time, there seems a strong suggestion that space or time might develop 'edges' which have borders, or Cauchy-Reinmann type contours, "so that rather than tumbling unsuspectingly off the edge of creation, we should be painfully and, it turns out, suicidally aware of our impending departure."

The Anthropic Principle:

Cosmologists use what they call the Copernican principle, that the universe looks exactly the same, whatever your position. We on earth do not have a privileged position. While Copernicus rejected the idea that the earth was the center of the universe, he accepted the idea that the sun was. The anthropic principle is supposed to limit the Copernican principle, which can be used to `explain,' or at least reduce or surprise at some of the more astonishing features of the cosmos. It does this by taking as basic that we are intelligent carbon based life forms, and then asking what is necessary in cosmological terms for the existence of such life forms. ([...])

Davies Keystone Proposition:

As articulate lecturers, of great universities tradition, Paul Davies render an exhilarating tour of cosmic integration, of 'Space, Superspace, and the Quantum Universe,' shedding light on the grand questions of human existence. His keystone proposition, leads to the more likely conclusion, that our carbon-based life was not arrived at coincidentally, but that the universe was 'intelligently designed for man.' Yet, the persuasive writers, and outstanding scientists own personal view of cosmic events, clearly supported argument of compelling address and outstanding guideline for 'intelligent design' skeptics and advocates.

From Physics to Metaphysics:

After a preface, prologue, Paul Davies starts with Einstein's comment, and proceeds on the concept of perception, supporting his case with scientific facts of subatomic chaos, quantum, and superspace before he turns to metaphysical implications, asking questions on the nature of reality, mind and matter, through the anthropic principle to ask, "Is the universe an accident?"

What do you think?

Asimov's Review:

Dr. Davies describes the deepest aspect of quantum theory in a way that is at once luminously clear and tremendously exciting. No one can read it without feeling the thrill of probing the universe to its very core."
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