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The World in Winter Paperback – 26 Oct 1978

3.9 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Paperback, 26 Oct 1978
£0.16
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere; New edition edition (26 Oct. 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0722123019
  • ISBN-13: 978-0722123010
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 10.8 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 615,026 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Christopher Samuel Youd was a British author best known for his science fiction published under the pseudonym John Christopher. His many novels include The Death of Grass and The Possessors. He published The World in Winter in 1962 and won the Guardian Prize in 1971. Youd also wrote under several other names including Stanley Winchester, Hilary Ford and Samuel Youd. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good book. But not great. "The death of grass" and "wrinkle in the skin" were far superior. Read this if you like John Christopher, but read the other two books even if you've never heard of him. They're amazing.
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Format: Paperback
This is the book which might have been reissued as a Modern Classic in 2009 instead of/ as well as his "Death of Grass." As I write this review when the UK is enduring the snowiest start to a year since perhaps 1963, an exceptionally cold winter at the time of which "World" appeared, the novel will have its ironic relevance at a time (the reverse of that when the book appeared) when warming, rather than cooling, is a concern. The basic motor of the cooling in the novel is solar radiation, still a much debated topic across the quasi-scientific community at least. And yet besides a chilling (sorry) portrayal of an adverse climate, this novel has much to say about the relations between the UK and Africa, the legacy of colonialism and the nature of nationalism. These are the issues, along with a strong dialectical sense of character formation (which "Death" lacks) which make this book a good read, and will make it pertinent long after global warming is back on the agenda and the current snows are those of yesteryear.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Yep good delivery and price
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Format: Paperback
This is a book that could have been written by John Wyndham on an off-day. It's not only the setting of a mid-century London succumbing to a global cataclysm that is reminiscent of Wyndham, but also the 'feel' of the book, the characters and the dialogue and the way the plot unfolds. It's not a bad book, quite attractive in its way, but the writing is a little stilted and not up to the standard of Kraken or Triffids.
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By A Customer on 5 July 2002
Format: Paperback
Although we may live in a world of alleged global warming this book was written when it hadn't really been considered. A new ice age brings the ice cap south of London, England. The story is about how people escape to African countries, the way they are treated by their hosts and ultimately an expedition back to discover how things now stand in London. It's interesting to see how the tables are turned on those from the First World when they have escaped to the Third World. It wouldn't be far from reality and not undeserved either. It's another What If? book and again comes out tops. Why is it so many of the books from the seventies never made it to film or even TV series?
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Format: Paperback
Interesting story! I do like the way that John Christopher develops a plot. Not as good as the Death of Grass (probably my favourite piece of fiction ever), but a good read. I can see. though, why this one is out of print!
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