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Who Moved the Stone? Paperback – 7 Jul 2006

4.3 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 223 pages
  • Publisher: Authentic Media (7 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1850786747
  • ISBN-13: 978-1850786740
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.6 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,482 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

It has the supreme merit of frankness and sincerity. -- The Sunday Times

From the Back Cover

'I owe Morison a great debt of gratitude. Who Moved the Stone? was an important early link in a long chain of evidence that God used to bring me into his kingdom. Morison's stirring intellectual exploration of the historical record proved to be an excellent starting point for my spiritual investigation.' --From the foreword by Lee Strobel English journalist Frank Morison had a tremendous drive to learn of Christ. The strangeness of the Resurrection story had captured his attention, and, influenced by skeptic thinkers at the turn of the century, he set out to prove that the story of Christ's Resurrection was only a myth. His probings, however, led him to discover the validity of the biblical record in a moving, personal way. Who Moved the Stone? is considered by many to be a classic apologetic on the subject of the Resurrection. Morison includes a vivid and poignant account of Christ's betrayal, trial, and death as a backdrop to his retelling of the climactic Resurrection itself. Among the chapter titles are: * The Book That Refused to Be Written * The Real Case Against the Prisoner * What Happened Before Midnight on Thursday * Between Sunset and Dawn * The Witness of the Great Stone * Some Realities of That Far-off Morning Who Moved the Stone? is a well-researched book that is as fascinating in its appeal to reason as it is accurate to the truthfulness of the Resurrection. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 28 July 1999
Format: Paperback
I've read many books on the historical reliability (and unreliability) of the New Testament; I've seen many educated opinions varying in every way; I done studies many resurrections-centered topics; but I've never seen a book quite like this! Morrison takes nothing for granted. He trusts his instincts, and, though coming shy of any kind of Biblical-Christian opinion, he beautifully defends the resurrection in this short examination. As a doubter I find it difficult to swallow what many Christians take for granted in their own faith. This book is not like most. However, as a believer I was thrown by Morrison into the last week of Jesus' life (and the following weeks) as I never have by any lecture or writing. Morrison brings to light many historical details missed my so many people (including myself). He is easy to read and difficult to put down.
To the skeptics: I was once a skeptic. It was not a brief reading of one or two apologetic works that convinced me; instead, it was months and months of hard research, with this book as one of the many highlights. I encourage all to read this.
Morrison's book will forever remain one of my personal favorites.
Luke Gilkerson
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Format: Paperback
Who Moved the Stone? was an enjoyable read.

Morison's main contention is to show that the tomb of Jesus was indeed empty on that first Easter morning. But he doesn't go much further than that. There is little discussion of the nature or meaning of the resurrection appearances for example, or the implications of empty tomb + appearances = risen Christ.

The prose is quite dated at nearly 80 years old, but take it slowly and carefully and its entirely manageable. Some readers may be put off by his characterisations of the women disciples of Jesus. Furthermore, he makes references to authors or arguments yet provides no footnotes to back up his quotes and let the reader follow his trail.

Some of the minutiae in his case seems a bit odd too.
For example, he argues that we can have no idea who the "young man" at the tomb in Mark's gospel is, because he dismisses Luke and Matthew's accounts that there were angels at the tomb as later legendary additions. Instead, Morison prefers some unknown disciple, not one of the Twelve and not one of the women, who believed Jesus' message about his forthcoming resurrection and hurried to the tomb first thing to see for himself if what Jesus had predicted was true.
Secondly, as to the question "Who moved the Stone?", Morison (I think) suggests that the Temple Guard who had been placed there moved it themselves, based in part, from a quote in the 2nd Century, fragmentary "Gospel of the Hebrews".

Overall though, his case is good. He makes logical inferences when reading the New Testament as an historical narrative. In particular, his suggestion that the women did indeed visit the tomb and discovered it empty, yet were subsequently removed from the early Christian apologetic makes sense.
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Format: Paperback
This book, as well as being a gripping read, is a very convinving account of what happened to Jesus in those last days of His life before His crucifixion. But this is really only there to set up the scene. It is Jesus' resurrection which the book sets out to convince us of and it does so very well.
Granted, it relies heavily on the accounts written by Jesus' desciples. But then I've never quite understood why people object to this. Why are we more willing to listen to biased anti-Christian writers like Tacitus and Josephus who wrote long after the events, got there information very second hand and whose writtings we scarcely have any copies written less than 700 years after the originals! With the gospels you eye witness (or in some cases once removed) accounts that were written no more than 30 years after the events took place (and probably long before that), by people who dies for what they had written (so they had to be pretty convinced it was true) and copies of which we have within 100 years of the originals and many fragments much earlier than this. So I think he has every right to use such historical documents as he does. And as to them being inconsistent - they contain just the inconsistencies that you would expect between different eye witnesses. If they were identical then I would smell a rat.
Oh, and in case you were wondering. What little Josephus and Tacitus say about Jesus, agrees with the gospels anyway.
So well done Frank Morison. If you read this boook with an open mind you will surely be convinced of the truth of Christ's resurrection. And if that is true, well then that means we need to take His teaching about Himself pretty seriously too.
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By Bacchus TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Mar. 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was written in 1930, and although its message is eternal and universal, I would say that the make-up of its potential readership in Britain today is very different to the one which existed when it was written. Britain is a much more multicultural nation and people are generally much more skeptical about religion than they used to be.

Frank Morison was the pseudonym of an English journalist called Albert Henry Moss (born 1881 died 1950), who sought to analyse and pick holes in the Resurrection story focussing on the disappearance of Jesus' body from his tomb after his crucifixion. He treats the sources of information that he has in an almost forensic manner and I for one enjoyed revisiting these passages and building up a highly detailed picture from just a few verses of each gospel. Every word and clause is pored over and treated as an historical fact. He brings attention, not only on the key players (Jesus, Peter, Pilate etc) but also on the other minor players in the drama to show their contribution to the story. Morison also brings in other historical sources to justify the logic of the Christian story as presented in the gospels such as the unauthorised gospels and Josephus' history. I would have appreciated more footnotes to indicate the exact sources of what he was trying to convey.

I recall from my schooldays my head teacher talking to my class about ideas contained in this book. I commented that surely it was more important to reflect on what Jesus did and said rather than focus too much on the Resurrection. He said that the Resurrection story was absolutely key and if it were not true, then none of the other aspects of Christ's life and work would matter.
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