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Theory of Machines and Mechanisms Hardcover – 27 Feb 2003

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Hardcover, 27 Feb 2003
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Theory of Machines and Mechanisms
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About the Author

John J. Uicker, Jr. is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. His teaching and research specialties are in solid geometric modeling, modeling of mechanical motion and their application to computer-aided design and manufacture. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University and joined the University of Wisconsin faculty in 1967. Uicker is one of the founding members of the US Council for the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms. He served for several years as editor-in-chief of the Mechanism and MachineTheory. Gordon R. Pennock is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. His teaching experience is primarily in the area of machine design. His research specialties are in theoretical kinematics and in the dynamics of mechanical motion. He has applied his research to robotics, rotary machinery and biomechanics, including kinematics and dynamics of articulated rigid-body mechanical systems. He received his Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Davis. Since joining the Purdue University faculty in 1983, he has served on several national committees and international program committees. He is the Student Section Advisor of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) at Purdue University, Region VI College Relations Chairman, Senior Representative on the Student Section Committee, and a member of the Board on Student Affairs. He is also an Associate of the Internal Combustion Engine Division, ASME, and served as the Technical Committee Chairman of Mechanical Design, Internal Combustion Engine Division, from 1993-1997. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Joseph E. Shigley (deceased May 1994) was Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan and a Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He held the Mechanisms Committee Award, the Worcester Reed Warner medal and the Machine Design Award. He was an author of eight books, including Mechanical Engineering Design (with Charles R. Mischke) and Applied Mechanics of Materials. He was also Coeditor-in-Chief of the Standard Handbook of Machine Design. He first wrote Kinematic Analysis of Mechanisms in 1958 and Dynamic Analysis of Machines in 1961. These texts became published in a single volume titled Theory of Machines in 1961 and evolved over the years to the current text, Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, now in its third edition.


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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bought this textbook for an undergrad mechanical engineering class. ... 22 Dec. 2015
By Ryo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Bought this textbook for an undergrad mechanical engineering class. The textbook did an ok job at explaining things but definitely required time to soak in.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars 29 Sept. 2015
By Barry - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is kinda hard to follow, but it was the required text for my class.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Skip if you can 15 Nov. 2014
By Apple Geek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you're buying this book to teach yourself design of machines and mechanisms, you should find another book. I got this book because it was required for a class I'm taking. The book does absolutely nothing to teach me what I need to know, and I've had to resort to other sources on the internet.
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, John J. Uicker, 4th edition 31 May 2010
By C. V. Abreu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book will be very useful to prepare my classes in the undergraduate program about Mechanisms that I am the teacher.
Another book very important in this area isMechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pointless Book 20 Sept. 2012
By Austin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This text is pretty much pointless to own. All it does is derive equations that make things more complicated than they need to be. I haven't found it helpfull at all with my class. My old Dynamics book is much better at explaining things and the stuff in the first three chapters of this book is basically stuff already learned in Dynamics but made 10 times more complicated.
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