Buy Used
£29.00
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Naked God (Night's Dawn) Hardcover – 30 Mar 2012

4.2 out of 5 stars 167 customer reviews

See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, 30 Mar 2012
£29.00
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 963 pages
  • Publisher: Subterranean Press; Sgd Ltd edition (30 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159606420X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596064201
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.7 x 6.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (167 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,647,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Amazon Review

Peter F. Hamilton's Night's Dawn trilogy--The Reality Dysfunction, The Neutronium Alchemist and now The Naked God--is ambitious in its galaxy-wide, multiple viewpoint plot, its political and metaphysical subject matter, its sheer 3,000-page scope. The damned have broken out of the afterlife and possessed whole planets; a gallant and untrustworthy space captain is haring off after alien sorts; and for the resurrected Al Capone, the secret masters of Earth and the government of the human Confederacy, it is business as usual...Hamilton's super-charged villain, Dexter Quinn, arrives on the home planet of humanity with a mission--to convert enough people to his Satanist creed that Earth can be taken out of the universe altogether: "Quinn raised an arm, his sleeve falling to reveal an albino hand with grizzled claw fingers. Three thin streamers of white fire lashed out from the talons, searingly bright in the gloomy, smoke-heavy air". The many fans of Hamilton's high-octane gloomy space opera will find this finale a worthy successor, and thrill to its many surprises; Hamilton's evocation of the depths of space and the strangeness of alien races has rightly won him much praise. A certain moral ambiguity has also crept in to what was at first a black and white universe--some of the returned damned are heroic and compassionate, and many of the living are not as nice as all that. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Volume 3 in the 'Night's Dawn' trilogy: after the multi-layered, multi-dramatic events described in The Reality Dysfunction and The Neutronium Alchemist, here is the awe-inspiring climax. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i liked the first 2 books in the series, but the third book felt very long, and the main characters just kept running around without adding much to the story. the main story theme was meant to be the search for the all powerful alien artifact, but that was left too late and went totally in a different(read boring) direction.
the main evil character keeps running around trying to be pure evil, but doesn't get any where. Louise is just sooo good that it becomes annoying and why someone like her who lived such a sheltered life, would go chasing after danger, instead of escaping with her sister, doesn't make much sense, and why a top secret organization is suddenly known to every tom dick and harry? the dead are so fixated on escaping the beyond they don't care where they end up(they should really have thought about where they will end up!).
Even al capon's just fizzles out. the main story ending is just very disappointing. i can't expand without spoiling the story, but after lots of pointing in one direction, through three very long books, the author just jumps the other way and finds an easy way to end the story, which is also a total over kill, i mean i doubt anyone saw that coming. very disappointing after a long and at times very entertaining read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you can cope with the constant change of pace in his writing, from fast and furious to slow and meandering this book will amaze you... the scale and depth of the whole trilogy is fantastic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Lived in another universe while reading trilogy. True quality science fiction of the highest order. Sad to reach the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It all went wrong ... and then God fixed it. The end.

Very weak ending. That about sums it up.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
have the trilogy
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
not as good as first two books, bit of a cop out happy ending expecting some thing smarter after first two books
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As a suggestion it's probably best to read the three novels in the series back to back, or at least with minimal intermissions. The vast numbers of underdeveloped cut-and-paste characters tended to blend together after a while, and I spent a good proportion of this final novel trying to remember events in the previous instalment (read about a year previously) and who these individuals who appear with no introduction actually were.
Even more than before, The Naked God reads like a collection of a dozen or so sensibly-sized novels thrown up in the air and the chapters shuffled into random order. On the down side, that did leave me wishing that the author wouldn't keep switching away from a plotline as I was just getting into it, but on the other hand it did create an sense of anticipation and a desire to keep reading to find out what was going to happen next.
Anyway, having enjoyed the first two books I knew what to expect, but I soon discovered that it was starting to turn into a soap opera with each return to a familiar scenario giving me my momentary fix before hauling me off somewhere else without very much having occured. I also found myself becoming increasingly alarmed as the number of pages remaining started to shrink with no sign of an impending conclusion, or indeed any indication that the plot had any intention of wrapping up. So the fact that the ending was rushed was not a surprise - the fact that it was so implausible and unsatisfying undoubtedly was. As others have suggested, the author seemed to have tied himself in knots with no way to untangle the various strands of plot without using a big pair of scissors.
Anyway, despite the lingering disappointment, and despite the impression I may have given up to now, I did enjoy the majority of this book and definitely the series as a whole - I just wish the author hadn't let it slip so far out of his control.
3 Comments 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 26 May 2000
Format: Hardcover
...right up until the very end, when the 'deus ex machina' conclusion (and it's too-neat tying up of loose ends) spoiled it all.
Which is a shame, because up 'til then this had been an almost faultless series -- right up there with Julian May's 'Many-coloured Land' saga as my all-time favourite sci-fi.
Still well worth reading the trilogy though.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews