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Ministry in Three Dimensions: A Theological Foundation for Local Church Leadership Paperback – 1 Jul 1999

4.6 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Darton,Longman & Todd Ltd (1 July 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0232523134
  • ISBN-13: 978-0232523133
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 13.3 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 104,072 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I write as an ordinand who was given this by my DDO during pre-selection conference interviews, and it is the book whose ideas I still consider the most now I am actually in training.
Croft takes the threefold order (Bishop, Priest, Deacon) and illustrates how these titles all actually invoke qualities (strategic oversight, leadership, service) that are all to some extent relevant to each of these positions.
While I am broadly liberal of centre, I feel that Croft's ideas would be valuable to most considering training or in training. Croft is also endearingly honest about the failure of his attempt to "manage" his church rather than be its pastor in his own time in ministry (he is now teaching at theological college).
And his appendix on types of church, from family and personality centred to organisation centred and cell grouped is very good.
Recommended.
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Format: Paperback
An insightive book, which explores the principal that the titles of Bishop, priest and deacon reflect roles rather than persons, and are equally applicable to the responsibilities of the laity as they are to the roles of the clergy. Ministry is to do with teamwork using different gifts rather than hierachical structures focused on what people are promoted to. A ground breaking book. Post-Charismatic, post- evangelical, post clerical. Readable.
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Format: Paperback
MINISTRY IN THREE DIMENSIONS: Ordination and Leadership in the Local Church by Steven Croft (Darton Longman and Todd, London, 2008)

I found Steven Croft's book on leadership both informative and challenging. Though perhaps primarily written with a view for those in the Anglican tradition it is also relevant for those interested in the ordained ministry in the wider Church.
Evangelicals will enjoy it because it is thoroughly biblical and examines several key passages on leadership as well as exploring leadership throughout the history of the Church. Croft also scrutinises secular management/leadership models and argues for the New Testament model of diakonia, the servant ( one who is prepared to serve behind the scenes), presbyteros, the elder ( the minister of the word and the sacraments), and episcope (the visionary, Shepherd and enabler). Croft deals thoroughly with each of these three `dimensions' of leadership in the church, by first building on diakonia and arguing that this is the foundation of all the others and that though one becomes an presbyteros or episcope `The root of diakonia is in every sense the foundation of all ministry which is truly Christian, including the exercise of leadership'. This might be compared to the `New Calvinist's' leadership models of prophet, priest and king which precludes the same emphasis on servant leadership.

In Croft's discussion of diakonia he argues that this in fact is the neglected dimension of the ministry of the ordained, stating that `The attitudes and attributes of diakonia need to be acquired before those of the presbyterate or of episcope and are the validation and foundation of the second and third dimensions of ministry' also that it is `the most important ..
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Format: Paperback
Ministry in three dimensions does not sound exciting from the title but for anyone interested in what ordained ministry should be about this book is a must. Steven Croft takes a step back and looks at ordained ministry from a biblical and ecclesiological perspective focusing on the roles as deacon priest and bishop and is reasonably successful in doing so.

This is a book which will certainly challenge some views of priestly ministry but can also inspire others to a more rounded view that fits with life in the 21st Century.
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Format: Paperback
I found this book to be very relevent and helpful in terms of how to tackle the issue of being relevent to a culture that is at least three if not four generations removed from having any contact with church whilst maintaining the integrity of our core beliefs.
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I am reading this book as part of the discernment process for ordination. It is a classic in terms of laying out ministry within the church of England. I will admit that I have found this difficult to read, in part because of the relatively small print and I personally struggle with the style in which it is written. That said the content is great and has been very useful.
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Format: Paperback
I have just read this book and have found it very helpful for my own personal ministry, but also very helpful in considering the ministry of others. I highly recommend it.
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Arrived fast, great book, easy to read, some of the other religious books are to academic and you need a hebrew dictonary to translate.
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