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Mary's the Name Paperback – 29 Jan 2017

4.8 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Cranachan Publishing (29 Jan. 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1911279114
  • ISBN-13: 978-1911279112
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 244,177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Ross Sayers writes contemporary fiction which explores friendship, family ties and morality with humour, unique character voices and pared-back prose. He graduated from the University of Stirling in 2014, with a BA in English Studies, and graduated again in 2015 with a M.Litt in Creative Writing. His stories and poems have featured in magazines such as Quotidian and Octavius, and his short story, ‘Dancin’ is currently used on West College Scotland’s Higher English course.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Honestly this book had my emotions churned up and spat out right from the very beginning; I laughed and cried throughout the book, my heart was warmed and it was broken - this book chewed me up and spat me out. And being Scottish and also having such a close relationship with my own grandparents I could honestly describe this book as opening the pages and crawling up onto my granda's knee as I relived so many happy memories.

Mary's the Name is a quirky yet powerfully evocative tale that will both warm and break your heart simultaneously - go grab yourself a wee corner to read in and settle yourself down, you are going to love it!
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Format: Paperback
Well what is there to say about wee Mary? I just loved her and I loved this book. The story is told entirely from her eight-year old point of view and I think that Ross Sayers has done a brilliant job of capturing his young protagonist's voice. A lot of the humour in the book comes from Mary's very literal understanding - or misunderstanding - of what the adults around her are saying. I liked the way the author used italics when Mary was using words she'd obviously heard adults using but didn't quite understand herself. The use of dialect for Mary's speech and also for the other characters added a real authenticity to the dialogue.

Mary's the Name will have you wanting to give Mary a cuddle as she goes through the confusion of being dropped by the girl she thought was her friend. I was so pleased when she found a new friend, Grace, in Skye and enjoyed the escapades they got up to. The strong bond between Mary and her Granpa was clear to see though I was beginning to wonder just what he had got them into!

Mary's the Name had me smiling a lot but also left me with a lump in my throat. A wonderfully warm and witty debut by a fresh new voice in Scottish fiction, a real pleasure to read. Ross Sayers is certainly an author to watch in future.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well if you can possibly call a book with violent criminals utterly delightful it would have to be this one. Ross Sayers's main character is an eight year old Scottish girl called Mary and this is how she sees events that take place that will change her life forever. After both her parents were tragically killed in a road accident she has lived with her granpa for the past year. She really is the 'mini me' of him too, from her love of the same music to her knowledge of all the James Bond films, she has an old head on young shoulders far beyond her years.  
At 66 her granpa  had kept himself pretty fit, being a boxer in his younger days he wasn't one for being walked over, which always made Mary feel safe when she was with him, but not much could be done when a gang robbed the Bookies he worked in when Mary was there too. Not long after  they do a bit of a moonlight flit and disappear over to the Isle of Skye to stay with her granpa's friend for the summer. Ross Sayers writes in a Scottish twang which gives the whole thing a glow when you read it.
Mary has the most wonderful innocent outlook on life that you find yourself really smiling at. You really want this little girl to have all the good things, the perfect friends, the little Cinderella that will go to the ball and find happiness at the end of the rainbow. Life unfortunately isn't like that. This is certainly a novel that requires a box of tissues and a hug when you have come to the end. Truly delightful!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mary's the Name is the story of a grubby little crime, as seen through the eyes of eight year old Mary. Mary lives with her Granpa, who she adores - but maybe he's not the man she thinks he is. The strength of this book lies in the deft way Sayers presents Granpa through Mary's loving eyes while still managing to reveal to the reader what a scumbag he is - a liar, a thief, a hooligan, a con-merchant who ropes his granddaughter into his scams; a man whose actions have horrendous consequences for other people, for himself, and, most heart-breakingly, for Mary herself.

The setting adds to this juxtaposition of surface-level confection and underlying grime - most of the action takes place in the picture-postcard setting of Portree, with its pastel-painted houses along the harbour, so when crime and violence and death intrude, it's even more shocking. (I grew up in Portree, so the depiction of the village made me feel all nostalgic!)

To tell a story like this through the eyes of a child is inspired. The charm and humour of the narrator, her childish enthusiasms and concerns, and her limited understanding of just how horrible things are getting, produce real dramatic tension.

An excellent debut. Sayers is a writer to watch.
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Format: Paperback
I loved this book. It is so very special in its depiction of examining the relationship between grandfather and granddaughter. I admit to having a tear in my eye during several events in this book.

Mary's The Name centres around an eight-year-old girl, Mary, who lives with her grandfather. Her parents died when she was only a toddler, and her grandfather took her in, bringing her up, so her grandpa is very much her dad. Mary is a little bit quirky, hugely intelligent beyond her years and fiercely independent. I did wonder at certain parts in the book if Mary was autistic, as she most certainly showed autistic traits, but whether this was intentional or not does not really matter, she is an interesting character who held my attention and whom I rooted for the entire way through the novel. I loved this little girl and everything she stood for. She is slowly growing up in the world and throughout the book we see this development in her social understanding of the world. The events that surround the robbery, shatter her idyllic illusion of the world, and we see the blinkers slowly being peeled back.

Then we have the grandpa, who I also loved. OK, he does get himself involved in a robbery, when he has a little girl to look after, but ultimately he is a good man. A hard working man, and I couldn't help but like him, even though I should have disliked him for his thoughtless actions. I suppose we all do things in life that we are not proud of, those mistakes that we look back on and think, what was I thinking? So, I could forgive him, as his love for Mary was so evident on the pages as I read his story. I had to forgive him, there was no other option.
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