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The Lady in the Lake (Phillip Marlowe) Paperback – 3 Nov 2011

4.5 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 Nov. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241956323
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241956328
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,559 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Best-known as the creator of the original private eye, Philip Marlowe, Raymond Chandler was born in Chicago in 1888 and died in 1959. Many of his books have been adapted for the screen, and he is widely regarded as one of the very greatest writers of detective fiction.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Timeless!
But if you know Chandler's history, look out for references to "the lads". (And the whisky)
Just superb, superb.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great read as expected. Gritty and funny. Loved it
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
haven't read a bad chandler book yet
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent service - item as described - fast delivery - many thanks
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Format: Paperback
Chandler has been over this ground before but The Lady in the Lake takes him out of the city and into rural mountains.The result is a contrast between his hero's city smart 'shamus'and the country cute lawman which is a sub-plot of its own that lends a pacy air to the main storyline.Marlowe is slicker and smarter than ever,but ,as usual ,makes errors which humanise and make the reader identify with him.We are shown the seedy side of the hustle lifestyle of '30s and 40's LA ,while silently respecting the humanity of the hero ,who speaks through the book in the first person. There are tough dames,weak rats and hard men side by side with the vulnerable and soft-all the characters are believable and Chandler portrays them in a way that makes them clear in the imagination.There are no tricks to the tale-the crime almost becomes secondary as the simple vices of people take controls of their lives .This is a great read,a hard boiled thriller which is as good as it gets and can be read over and over.
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By Sid Nuncius #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 14 Dec. 2014
Format: Paperback
I have just re-read this for probably the 6th or 7th time, but I hadn't read it for at least a decade. It is still quite brilliant, and the pleasure of reading such a superbly written, engrossing and humane novel is undimmed by either familiarity or time. The plot is gripping and the first person narration is an absolute masterclass in how to do it.

I think Chandler was a truly great writer of English. Marlowe has the tough one-liners and smart comebacks, of course, but he also has wonderful, meditative passages on the human condition which you hardly notice as being meditative because they are so well done. Marlowe is, under the hard-boiled exterior, a moral and humane man with a deep understanding of people which enables him to get to the heart of things and it is this which makes Chandler's books stand out as fine novels as well as first-class detective stories.

The other aspect of Chandler's sheer brilliance is his characterization. Everyone, even the most minor of characters, is drawn convincingly and with immense skill. They generally seem to paint their own portraits through what they say and do rather than a lot of the laborious psychological theorising which can get so tiresome in lesser detective novels. For example, Jim Patton, the Constable (effectively sherrif) of a small mountain county is a creation of genius, I think.

Few people will need an endorsement from me to persuade them to read a Chandler novel, but I would recommend this very warmly indeed. Plot, place and characters are all brilliantly done: it is, quite simply, superb.
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Format: Paperback
The consensus is The Lady in the Lake is not comparable to Chandler's "big three" (Big Sleep, Long Goodbye, Farewell My Lovely), but I found it just as satisfying.

Chandler's writing is oil slick. So easy, so intelligent, so very cool. As usual the characters are somehow subtle but eccentric all at once and the similes and descriptions are stylishly inventive. The plot doesn't weave and deceive as much as some of his other novels but this didn't detract from the story for me.

The Marlowe in TLITL is less hostile, less paranoid, less aggressive than in some of the other novels. This makes me like him more but some readers may prefer his younger, spikier self.

Still, like all the other Chandler-Marlowe novels, reading it is an exceptional way to pass the time. I can only imagine literary snobbery towards crime fiction is the reason why Chandler is not held up as one of the 20th century's greatest writers.
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Format: Kindle Edition
A complex hard boiled thriller.

The story sees Derace Kingsley, a wealthy businessman, hires Marlowe to find his estranged wife, Crystal. Although separated from his wife, Kingsley fears that Crystal— rich, pretty, spoiled and reckless—may have become involved in a scandal that could jeopardize his position with the shareholders of the company of which he is an executive. The last definite place Crystal was known to have been was their vacation cabin on Little Fawn Lake. Kingsley had received a telegram from Crystal about two weeks before (dateline El Paso, Texas) stating that she was divorcing him and marrying her gigolo boyfriend, Chris Lavery. But when Kingsley ran into Lavery in L.A. and asked him where Crystal was, Lavery told him that he hadn't seen her, wasn't with her in El Paso, didn't know where she was, and never agreed, or wanted, to marry her.

Marlowe begins his investigation with a visit to Chris Lavery in the corrupt neighboring town of Bay City (modeled on Santa Monica).[1] Lavery disclaims any interest in or involvement with Crystal Kingsley. While watching Lavery's house, Marlowe is threatened by the police, who suspect him of watching Lavery's neighbor, Dr. Almore. A tough cop named Al Degarmo accuses Marlowe of harassing Almore. Marlowe discovers that Almore's wife died under suspicious circumstances and that her death was by the police.

Marlowe moves his investigations to Little Fawn Lake. Kingsley has given him a note to the caretaker of his vacation home, Bill Chess. Chess is in an alcoholic haze, depressed over having been abandoned by his wife, Muriel, at about the same time as Crystal disappeared.
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