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Jimmy Corrigan - The Smartest Kid on Earth Hardcover – 17 Jan 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 17 Jan 2001
£18.09 £8.99

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 382 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; 01 edition (17 Jan. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375404538
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375404535
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 4 x 21.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,423,815 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"This haunting and unshakable book will change the way you look at your world. Ware captures landscapes made to flatten emotion--a clinic shrouded in snow, a sterile apartment complex--and yet shows the reader the meaning and even beauty in every glimpse from a highway, every snippet of small talk." --"Time" magazine
""Jimmy Corrigan" pushes the form of comics into unexpected formal and emotional territory." --"Chicago Tribune
""Graphically inventive, wonderfully realized . . . ["Jimmy Corrigan"] is wonderfully illustrated in full color, and Ware's spare, iconic drawing style can render vivid architectural complexity or movingly capture the stark despondency of an unloved child." --"Publishers Weekly" (starred review)
"
""Ware's use of words is sparing, and at times maudlin. But the real joy is his art. It's stunning. In terms of attention to detail, graceful use of color, and overall design--Ware has no peer. And while each panel is relentlessly polished--never an errant line or lazily rendered image--his drawings, somehow, remain delicate and achingly lyrical." --Dave Eggers, "The New York Times Book Review
"

This haunting and unshakable book will change the way you look at your world. Ware captures landscapes made to flatten emotion a clinic shrouded in snow, a sterile apartment complex and yet shows the reader the meaning and even beauty in every glimpse from a highway, every snippet of small talk. "Time" magazine
"Jimmy Corrigan"pushes the form of comics into unexpected formal and emotional territory. "Chicago Tribune
" Graphically inventive, wonderfully realized . . . ["Jimmy Corrigan"] is wonderfully illustrated in full color, and Ware s spare, iconic drawing style can render vivid architectural complexity or movingly capture the stark despondency of an unloved child. "Publishers Weekly" (starred review)
"
" Ware s use of words is sparing, and at times maudlin. But the real joy is his art. It's stunning. In terms of attention to detail, graceful use of color, and overall design Ware has no peer. And while each panel is relentlessly polished never an errant line or lazily rendered image his drawings, somehow, remain delicate and achingly lyrical. Dave Eggers, "The New York Times Book Review
""

Book Description

The most ambitious, beautiful, moving 'comic book' ever produced: an astonishing tour de force that won the Guardian First Book Award 2001 and The American Book Award 2001. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I should probably have bought this book, but borrowed it from the library instead. I'd picked it up a few times in bookshops but always put it back. Something about it was just off putting. Now I have read it, I realise I need to buy a copy to read again next year. And the year after and the year after.

The story is nothing much, really. Jimmy Corrigan, a middle aged, desperately unhappy man, travels to meet the father he never knew, and meets the sister he never knew he had. His mother remains behind, with her unceasing demands upon him. At the same time, his ancestor is growing up at the end of the nineteenth century, as they are building the Worlds Fair.

The drawings are fine, the story is fine. Three stars, no problem.

But something about it grabs hold and doesn't let go. It's the loneliness, the desperation and the search for something meaningful to cling onto that makes this stand out from the crowd. The visual style is sparse and minimal, which just fits the subject matter.

It's not something that is incredibly enjoyable as such, but it is powerful, strangely affecting and lingers long in the mind.

Well, well worth a look.
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Format: Paperback
Jimmy Corrigan is an above-average comic but please, for god's sake, do not buy the paperback edition! As I'm reading it the first time, the book is falling apart. This is not cool, since the comic itself it great. I wish I'd thrown in those extra bucks and bought the hardcover.
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Format: Paperback
I read a few glowing reviews of Jimmy Corgan: The Smartest Kid on Earth before I bought it, but now having read it, I think it's fair warning to say this won't be everyone's cup of tea. The story is about a lonely middle-aged man with a vivid imagination. The plot lines are complex, the art is high quality and it definitely makes you think about the nature of parental relationships. However, it's not a page turner, and it's hard to engage or sympathise with the central character and overall I found it heavy going in places. I think a particular audience will love it, but the average graphic novel reader might find it a bit too serious a read.
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Format: Paperback
Autobiography, and more unusually Literary Fiction, are rarely seen in graphic novels. This bold endeavour combines both. Originally a newspaper strip running for over five years this mammoth examination of father/ son connections explores several generations of the same family largely using two different time periods.

The episodic nature of its origins presents a series of scenes or tableaus without commentary or judgement but with brutal honesty allowing us to see just how painfully uncomfortable relationships and familial interaction can be. There is a bit of monologue or narration but usually we are left, just as with real human beings, to puzzle out what is going on for ourselves.

You can sense Ware growing as a writer as it is not until the last third of the book that he really discovers just how poignant and moving this medium can actually become. There are some of the Ware trademarks such as cut outs and fake instructional manuals but these are rare.

The art is more illustrative than cartoonish. With a limited palette and limited dimensions (but good perspective) he creates his own distinctive style. Everything is very tidy and deliberate with no sketching or rough textures visible. He also loves tiny panels and tiny lettering which can slow you down as you are forced to stop and squint. Ware also develops his own visual vocabulary using different styles and colours to indicate memories, thoughts and even exposition.

This work relies on the reader working hard and investing in something that is more art than literature. But it is just as easy to enter this story if you have never read a comic as if you were fluent in what has gone before.

This is a real labour of love that deserves a Thumbs Up!
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Format: Hardcover
Autobiography, and more unusually Literary Fiction, are rarely seen in graphic novels. This bold endeavour combines both. Originally a newspaper strip running for over five years this mammoth examination of father/ son connections explores several generations of the same family largely using two different time periods.

The episodic nature of its origins presents a series of scenes or tableaus without commentary or judgement but with brutal honesty allowing us to see just how painfully uncomfortable relationships and familial interaction can be. There is a bit of monologue or narration but usually we are left, just as with real human beings, to puzzle out what is going on for ourselves.

You can sense Ware growing as a writer as it is not until the last third of the book that he really discovers just how poignant and moving this medium can actually become. There are some of the Ware trademarks such as cut outs and fake instructional manuals but these are rare.

The art is more illustrative than cartoonish. With a limited palette and limited dimensions (but good perspective) he creates his own distinctive style. Everything is very tidy and deliberate with no sketching or rough textures visible. He also loves tiny panels and tiny lettering which can slow you down as you are forced to stop and squint. Ware also develops his own visual vocabulary using different styles and colours to indicate memories, thoughts and even exposition.

This work relies on the reader working hard and investing in something that is more art than literature. But it is just as easy to enter this story if you have never read a comic as if you were fluent in what has gone before.

This is a real labour of love that deserves a Thumbs Up!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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