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Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 Paperback – 4 May 2014

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Product details

  • Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Updated edition (4 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691162433
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691162430
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 3.6 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,673,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"[D]eeply rewarding."--Lisa Hilton, "Standpoint"

"[R]ich discussions of contemporary writing."--Rachel Bowlby, "Times Higher Education"

""Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985", takes the reader on a journey that only be described as adventurous and kaleidoscopic, cryptic yet defiantly sincere. There really isn't a dull moment amid its entire 534 pages."--David Marx, "David Marx Book Reviews"

"[D]eeply rewarding."--Lisa Hilton, "Standpoint"




One of "The Guardian" Best Books of 2013, chosen by Pankaj Mishra

Selected for the SFG Gift Guide 2013


"[D]eeply rewarding."--Lisa Hilton, "Standpoint"


"[I]mpeccably translated and annotated."--Robert Gordon, "Literary Review"

"[A]ltogether fantastic. . . . "Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985" is indispensable in its entirety, a treasure trove of timeless insight on literature and life."--Maria Popova, "Brain Pickings"

"The general reader will come away from the "Letters" admiring this skeptical, loyal, generous, industrious man, who gave the life of letters the dignity it so often seems to lack."--Adam Kirsch, "Barnes and Noble Review"

"[C]ompelling."--Tiffany Nichols, "City Book Review"

One of "The Guardian" Best Books of 2013, chosen by Pankaj Mishra
Selected for the SFG Gift Guide 2013

"[C]onsistently absorbing and suggestive. . . . [T]he chronicle not only of Calvino's intellectual development but of postwar Italy's. . . . The letters in this book deal with great subtlety, sophistication, and wit, and occasionally even a certain cynicism, with challenges that might have overburdened a less mercurial, multifarious, essentially sane spirit."--Jonathan Galassi, New York Review of Books

"The image of Calvino as postmodernism's light-footed prince follows easily. But, behind that image, who was Calvino? The publication of a considerable selection of Calvino's letters affords an opportunity, or many opportunities, to ask that question anew."--Lawrence Norfolk, Wall Street Journal

"[T]here is no writer alive who resembles . . . Calvino. So the appearance of a selection of Calvino's letters in English is a moment of happiness. . . . [T]hese letters offer a gorgeous portrait of Calvino in the midst of his own productivity: as an editor, a reader, a critic, an inventor of new literary forms. And they allow the reader to investigate the complicated background from which those strange forms emerged."--Adam Thirlwell, New Republic

"This collection, the first in English, gives voice and witness to a vibrant mind intensely engaged in the literary and political future of postwar Italy and the history of ideas. . . . McLaughlin's translation is award-winning; the extensive notes provide a model of masterful research. Irresistible for Calvino readers."--Library Journal

"Italo Calvino's letters . . . provide . . . pleasure and surprise. . . . In them he shines as an editor of obvious brilliance and a writer of lavish gratitude towards those who appreciate his work."--Vivian Gornick, Prospect

"Superbly translated by Martin McLaughlin, these letters place Calvino in the larger frame of 20th century Italy and provide a showcase for his refined and civil voice. . . . Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 is a charming addition to the Planet Calvino--a place cluttered with sphinxes, chimeras, knights, spaceships and viscounts both cloven and whole."--Ian Thomson, Guardian

"[I]mpeccably translated and annotated."--Robert Gordon, Literary Review

"[A]ltogether fantastic. . . . Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 is indispensable in its entirety, a treasure trove of timeless insight on literature and life."--Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

"The general reader will come away from the Letters admiring this skeptical, loyal, generous, industrious man, who gave the life of letters the dignity it so often seems to lack."--Adam Kirsch, Barnes and Noble Review

"It is impossible to overstate just how sublime and richly insightful Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 is in its entirety."--Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

"This selection of letter offers intellectual riches and access to the workings of a wholly original mind. The presentation of the book is exemplary, with copious, precise notes by Martin McLaughlin identifying not only the recipients of the letters but also the background to the topics under discussion. McLaughlin's translation is fluent and elegant throughout."--Joseph Farrell, The (Scotland) Herald

"[F]ascinating. . . . A vastly entertaining collection, meticulously edited and annotated."--Peter Sirr, Irish Times

"As the letters chart Calvino's journey from postwar communist concerns with faithfulness to history to his destiny as an imaginative maestro more concerned with being faithful to the universe, the text both instructs and entertains."--Gregory Day, WA Today

"[C]ompelling."--Tiffany Nichols, City Book Review

"[D]eeply rewarding."--Lisa Hilton, Standpoint

"[I]t is provides a far greater insight into the life of Italo Calvino than an ordinary biography would have done."--Artswrap

"Michael Wood has made a studious selection of Calvino's letters and a provides an insightful introduction that frames his selection in the larger tableau of Calvino's life and work. Ample notes further clarify many of the personal and historical details as well as the Italian idioms that appear throughout these letters. It is a book worthy of both study and appreciation."--Stephan Delbos, BODY

"Selected and introduced by Michael Wood, translated by Martin McLaughlin, the collection is a mesmerizing peek inside the thinking of the great modern fabulist. . . . Much of [Calvino's] letter writing seems to be an exercise in clear expression. . . . He is a writer as scrupulous and demanding on himself as he is on the world around him. Calvino took the role of public intellectual very seriously, convinced in his job to explore the fringes of thought. . . . A writer of such great control and refreshing playfulness, Calvino reveals how serious and unsure his journey was in this collection of candid letters."--Seth Satterlee, PWxyz (Publishers Weekly blog)

"There is much to admire in McLaughlin's translation of the letters, not least his sensitivity to Calvino's variations of style and tone, from the ironic to the pedantic. The collection also provides new texts in English that provide valuable insights into the germination of Calvino's best-known works. It captures the writer's generosity and integrity and, above all, his deep and abiding passion for literary culture."--Rita Wilson, Sydney Review of Books

One of The Guardian Best Books of 2013, chosen by Pankaj Mishra

Selected for the SFG Gift Guide 2013

-[C]onsistently absorbing and suggestive. . . . [T]he chronicle not only of Calvino's intellectual development but of postwar Italy's. . . . The letters in this book deal with great subtlety, sophistication, and wit, and occasionally even a certain cynicism, with challenges that might have overburdened a less mercurial, multifarious, essentially sane spirit.---Jonathan Galassi, New York Review of Books

-The image of Calvino as postmodernism's light-footed prince follows easily. But, behind that image, who was Calvino? The publication of a considerable selection of Calvino's letters affords an opportunity, or many opportunities, to ask that question anew.---Lawrence Norfolk, Wall Street Journal

-[T]here is no writer alive who resembles . . . Calvino. So the appearance of a selection of Calvino's letters in English is a moment of happiness. . . . [T]hese letters offer a gorgeous portrait of Calvino in the midst of his own productivity: as an editor, a reader, a critic, an inventor of new literary forms. And they allow the reader to investigate the complicated background from which those strange forms emerged.---Adam Thirlwell, New Republic

-This collection, the first in English, gives voice and witness to a vibrant mind intensely engaged in the literary and political future of postwar Italy and the history of ideas. . . . McLaughlin's translation is award-winning; the extensive notes provide a model of masterful research. Irresistible for Calvino readers.---Library Journal

-Italo Calvino's letters . . . provide . . . pleasure and surprise. . . . In them he shines as an editor of obvious brilliance and a writer of lavish gratitude towards those who appreciate his work.---Vivian Gornick, Prospect

-Superbly translated by Martin McLaughlin, these letters place Calvino in the larger frame of 20th century Italy and provide a showcase for his refined and civil voice. . . . Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 is a charming addition to the Planet Calvino--a place cluttered with sphinxes, chimeras, knights, spaceships and viscounts both cloven and whole.---Ian Thomson, Guardian

-[I]mpeccably translated and annotated.---Robert Gordon, Literary Review

-[A]ltogether fantastic. . . . Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 is indispensable in its entirety, a treasure trove of timeless insight on literature and life.---Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

-The general reader will come away from the Letters admiring this skeptical, loyal, generous, industrious man, who gave the life of letters the dignity it so often seems to lack.---Adam Kirsch, Barnes and Noble Review

-It is impossible to overstate just how sublime and richly insightful Italo Calvino: Letters, 1941-1985 is in its entirety.---Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

-This selection of letter offers intellectual riches and access to the workings of a wholly original mind. The presentation of the book is exemplary, with copious, precise notes by Martin McLaughlin identifying not only the recipients of the letters but also the background to the topics under discussion. McLaughlin's translation is fluent and elegant throughout.---Joseph Farrell, The (Scotland) Herald

-[F]ascinating. . . . A vastly entertaining collection, meticulously edited and annotated.---Peter Sirr, Irish Times

-As the letters chart Calvino's journey from postwar communist concerns with faithfulness to history to his destiny as an imaginative maestro more concerned with being faithful to the universe, the text both instructs and entertains.---Gregory Day, WA Today

-[C]ompelling.---Tiffany Nichols, City Book Review

-[D]eeply rewarding.---Lisa Hilton, Standpoint

-[I]t is provides a far greater insight into the life of Italo Calvino than an ordinary biography would have done.---Artswrap

-Michael Wood has made a studious selection of Calvino's letters and a provides an insightful introduction that frames his selection in the larger tableau of Calvino's life and work. Ample notes further clarify many of the personal and historical details as well as the Italian idioms that appear throughout these letters. It is a book worthy of both study and appreciation.---Stephan Delbos, BODY

-Selected and introduced by Michael Wood, translated by Martin McLaughlin, the collection is a mesmerizing peek inside the thinking of the great modern fabulist. . . . Much of [Calvino's] letter writing seems to be an exercise in clear expression. . . . He is a writer as scrupulous and demanding on himself as he is on the world around him. Calvino took the role of public intellectual very seriously, convinced in his job to explore the fringes of thought. . . . A writer of such great control and refreshing playfulness, Calvino reveals how serious and unsure his journey was in this collection of candid letters.---Seth Satterlee, PWxyz (Publishers Weekly blog)

-There is much to admire in McLaughlin's translation of the letters, not least his sensitivity to Calvino's variations of style and tone, from the ironic to the pedantic. The collection also provides new texts in English that provide valuable insights into the germination of Calvino's best-known works. It captures the writer's generosity and integrity and, above all, his deep and abiding passion for literary culture.---Rita Wilson, Sydney Review of Books

From the Back Cover

"Calvino liked to present an inscrutable face to the world, but this literally marvelous collection of letters shows him to have been gregarious, puckish, funny, combative, and, above all, wonderful company, and opens a new and fascinating perspective on one of the master writers of the twentieth century. Michael Wood and Martin McLaughlin have done Calvino, and us, a great and loving service."--John Banville, author of Ancient Light

"Italo Calvino was one of the most sparkling literary inventors and innovators of the twentieth century. He was also a highly astute mediator of the work of others and a pellucid purveyor of a subtly elaborated idea of literature. To have a generous selection of his letters in English, translated with great verve, represents a major addition to our knowledge of his work, offering countless precious glimpses of the gears and levers that operate the 'literature machine.'"--Robert S. C. Gordon, University of Cambridge

"These letters are invaluable. They are an important source for understanding the intellectual and historical context of Italo Calvino's writing and thought, and his relations with other writers. They are filled with irony and insights on a vast variety of interesting literary and cultural topics. And they are beautifully written--a literary achievement in themselves. This translation is a real achievement as well."--Lucia Re, University of California, Los Angeles

"This is an excellent translation."--Andrea Ciccarelli, Indiana University

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost at his Shoulder 15 Jun. 2013
By The Ginger Man - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a beautifully produced collection which includes a third of the items that appeared in Luca Baranelli's Lettere in 2000. Calvino's correspondence in this volume focuses on the literary and political rather than family and personal matters, and more on international than on narrowly Italian issues.

During his life, Calvino avoided both interviews and discussions of his work. In a letter dated September 1954, he suggests that "autobiography is something that one writes by doing a kind of violence to oneself." The author asks that his writing stand on its own: "A text must be something that can be read and evaluated without reference to the existence or otherwise of a person whose name and surname appear on the cover."

Calvino's letters do not display a writer practicing for his fiction or essays, nor do they give evidence of a man with an eye on posterity. Instead the reader observes a man living in the present. Michael Wood, who selected and introduces the correspondence, says that it gives "the sense of direct communication, of a man being as clear as he can about a host of matters." In his letters, Calvino, "tells rather than shows his correspondents what he means - with great and often moving success," observes Wood.

There is, however, plenty here for readers who have followed this giant of post war Italian literature. Calvino talks of his preference for the creation of short stories, "rounded and perfect like so many eggs, stories that if you add or remove a single word the whole thing goes to pieces." The author gives us a hint of the curious creative process for Mr. Palomar in a letter from 1983: "For a long time, I thought some philosophy of mine (even though I was not able to expound it intentionally) would emerge from the book (and would take on a shape also for me) from the juxtaposition and intersection of problems." In the end, Calvino admits, "I knew less than at the beginning." In a July 1978 letter, the author includes the fascinating revelation that the idea for his classic If on a Winter's Night a Traveller came from a Peanuts poster next to his desk which shows Snoopy typing, "It was a dark and stormy night..."

There are some individual treats among his letters such as a missive to Umberto Eco in which Calvino lists "elements of interest" in reading Name of the Rose. It is interesting to see Calvino advocate the Italian publication of Midnight's Children in 1982 as he he discusses "the influence of Naipaul but also of Gunter Grass and perhaps of Gabriel Marquez" on Rushdie's work. But the true value of this collection is that it puts the reader at Calvino's shoulder as he goes about the daily work of writing, editing, translating and reacting.

Calvino is serious about his role. "The writer," he submits in 1951, "is someone who tears himself to pieces in order to liberate his neighbor." Eight years later, he concludes that "we are people, there is no doubt, who exist solely insofar as we write, otherwise we don't exist at all."

Calvino advises in a 1984 letter that "an author's poetics must be derived a posteriori from his works." As readers, we should first look for Calvino in his fiction and essays. To this, however, we are now fortunate to be able to add his correspondence which contributes greatly to our understanding of the man while, despite his warning, expanding our view of his poetics.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Calvino turned into excellent idiomatic English prosell 22 Aug. 2013
By Experienced Audiophile - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The letters themselves are fascinating of anyone who has read a great deal of modern Italian literature. If you have not, you will miss the important assessment of Fenoglio, and much else of importance. Remarkable translation, and a good selection, less expensive than the Mondadori complete letters. If you haven't read the Italian originals, you will not appreciate the quality of the translation.
5.0 out of 5 stars Letters of Italo Calvino 5 Oct. 2013
By Mary Pat O'Kelly - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Italo Calvino is writer in whom I have been interested for years. Have read, I think, all of his novels, in Italian. He had one of the cleverest minds of anyone I can think of. He died in Siena and was one of the last people to die in the old hospital (Santa Maria Della Scala). This happened while I was in language school there.
Was delighted when I discovered that his letters had been collected and I could read them.
5.0 out of 5 stars if you want to get insight into Calvino genius and ... 23 Dec. 2014
By Lamar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
if you want to get insight into Calvino genius and illuminate some hidden aspects of his writing this is real treat. Perhaps, english translation is not as saucy as Italian but it carries a lot of ammo.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars when gods walked the earth 11 Jun. 2013
By tripoli - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Calvino is dead, most of the people he wrote letters to are dead, read these letters to learn about the lives they lived. The book is also exquisitely designed and printed. This book is treasure.
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