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The Georgics of Virgil: Bilingual Edition Hardcover – 1 May 2005

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus Giroux; Bilingual edition (May 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374161399
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374161392
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.4 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,613,470 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"David Ferry's translation of the enchanting

"David Ferry's translation of the enchanting "Georgics" is for poetry lovers like a drink of water from a country spring on a summer day. It's refreshing, invigorating, almost intoxicating in the pleasure of discovery it offers." --Anthony Day, "Los Angeles Times"


David Ferry's translation of the enchanting "Georgics" is for poetry lovers like a drink of water from a country spring on a summer day. It's refreshing, invigorating, almost intoxicating in the pleasure of discovery it offers. "Anthony Day, Los Angeles Times""

David Ferry's translation of the enchanting Georgics is for poetry lovers like a drink of water from a country spring on a summer day. It's refreshing, invigorating, almost intoxicating in the pleasure of discovery it offers. Anthony Day, Los Angeles Times" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

David Ferry is the translator of Gilgamesh (1992), The Odes of Horace (1998), The Eclogues of Virgil (1999), and The Epistles of Horace (2001), winner of the Landon Translation Prize--all published by FSG.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderful translation and you can follow it with the parallel version if you have even a smattering of Latin.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars 11 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "This song I sang...." 25 Dec. 2012
By Owl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The Georgics of Virgil: A Bilingual Edition" is one of the golden treasures from the golden age of Augustus. The song, in four books, tells of the work in its seasons, of the growing of plants, of the husbandry of livestock, and, enchantingly, an entire fourth book on the small creatures on whom much of our life depends, the bees.

As a poem, it is exquisite in itself, the images still as fresh and apt as when Virgil urged tenderness to an old stallion ("You put him away in a stall.....be respectful of his age, and his great heart, the deeds he has performed...") and bid us plant the vines "facing the warmth of the sun, Their backs to the northern cold as before----Such is the need, when young, of what's familiar."

It is even lovelier, more resonant, read after you have rejoiced in Ferry's fine translation of Hesiod's "Works and Days,". It is Hesiod who Virgil seeks to bring to the Latin muse, expanding the themes of the Greek who presents himself as a shepherd from the harsh village of Ascra. Virgil writes over 500 hundred years after Hesiod, and as a poet greatly admired in Rome, befriended by the discerning Maecenas and by the Emperor Augustus, cherished colleague of Horace, yet remembering his roots in the land.

Not only remembering the roots, but promoting their planting. Augustus having survived the horrific civil wars and pacified most of his known world ("They make a desert and call it peace," wrote Tacitus, presumably quoting the bitter words of a British chief), re-settled his soldiers by giving estates of people on the losing side of the civil wars to returning soldiers. Virgil's role was to write of farming, the seasons, the virtue and necessity of work, in a way that would inspire a return to the land. Not as a paid propagandist in a sneering sense, but as one who was grateful for the end of the wars, appreciative of the Pax Romana, and wishing to do his part in making August's vision so.

As a poem, compared to Hesiod, Virgil is descriptive---beautifully, gorgeously so, a tapestry of splendid words and thoughts---but differing from the taut drama of Hesiod's unique personal voice in speaking truth to his reluctant farmer-brother, Perses. The tautness is picked up a thousand years later in Chaucer's "When that Aprille with its shoures soute..." and echoed another 500 years beyond in Milton..

The arc of love between us and the earth on which we live expressed so vividly Virgil continues to our own times, thank Jupiter! Thanks equally to David Ferry.

THIS is the version of "The Georgics" to by. It is written by a poet, whose translations of Horace are the best of the best. His translation of the Georgics reads aloud in English with lovely metres and perfect pitch in his choice of words. Rarely does one wince at sense or sounds, and almost everywhere---line after line---is poetry so lovely that if we were in a dream and were to awaken (as Caliban saith), we would cry to dream again.

Happily, we can read Ferry/Virgil to our hearts content. The Latin is shown on the facing pages, so one can read the words of Virgil in his language, which is accessible at least as to sound and often as to sense, even with a modest bit of Latinity.

This is the go-to edition of the Georgics. A treasure, a delight, an inspiration.
1.0 out of 5 stars waste of $9 10 Feb. 2017
By seebutter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
DO NOT BUY EBOOK IF YOU NEED THIS FOR CLASS WITH THE LATIN TRANSLATIONS.

Ebook version does not have latin translations. waste of $9.99, second time trying to buy the right copy of this book.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterful Translation 1 Feb. 2011
By TransLorentz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Translating was never an easy task, especially for verse and poetry, and translating between a Latin text meant for Classical recitation into modern English, with all the differences in tradition and syntax between the two languages, must require a Herculean effort. Ferry's translation is both reasonably faithful and very readable for modern English audiences, restoring an otherwise inaccessibly archaic and (arguably) arcane Classical masterpiece in its full glory to modern literary tastes.
5.0 out of 5 stars New to Virgil 24 Aug. 2013
By Oliver - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm enjoying this book very much. I don't know about other translations so I can't make comparisons in that regard. In this book, the left side page is in Latin and the right side page is the English translation. It's fun to read the English and then look at the Latin to pick out recognizable words here and there.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an esteemed translation 19 Feb. 2009
By Poetry Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
David Ferry is one of, if not the best translators of ancient texts we have in America. His erudition and keen ear (and this is a difficult text to translate) open up the Georgics is such a way as to make them both complex and accessible at once.
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