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Into That Forest Audio CD – Audiobook, 3 Sep 2013

4.2 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (3 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1480543950
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480543959
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 1.6 x 14 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,252,205 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

'Strikingly original . . . vivid.' The Bookseller

'Extraordinary . . . I love the voice and the relationships.' Wendy Coolings

'I was competely spellbound.' Lovereading

-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Paperback.

About the Author

Louis Nowra Louis Nowra is a critically acclaimed and multi-award-winning writer of plays, film and tv scripts, non-fiction, memoir and fiction. He was born in Melbourne and lives in Sydney with his wife, Mandy Sayer, also a writer, and their Chihuahua, Coco, and Miniature Pinscher, Basil.

-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Paperback.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's strange to think that, under the right conditions, humans can revert back to the wild state our ancestors worked so hard to detach civilised society from. After all, we still have the tools; keen eyesight and hearing, a decent sense of smell and a predators' ability to problem solve, we just fail to utilise them, or simply employ them in different ways. And regressing to the wild-side is exactly what happens in Into That Forest; stranded in the Tasmanian wilderness, two young girls, Hannah and Becky, are adopted by a pair of Tasmanian tigers and spend the subsequent four years learning to hunt, read the outback and generally live as wild animals.

As the girls integrate themselves with their new parents, they lose the use of English, instead opting to employ the grunts, snarls and body language of the tigers. They also disregard their clothes and reject the two-limbed approach to running. The harsh realities of the wilderness also start to stimulate the girls' animal instincts; they begin to give into the passion of the hunt and even develop a taste for warm blood and raw flesh ‒ there are no punches pulled here, this is a full and, at times, brutal transformation.

The book is narrated from the perspective of a seventy-six-year-old version of Hannah (in a slightly non-standard English) as she looks back on her time with the tigers. However, this doesn't take away from the deeply absorbing plot, far from it. The events are described in such a way that a subtle sense of foreboding begins to infiltrate the text, and this foreboding is realised in a series of heart-wrenching events beginning around the book's halfway point, and culminating in the devastatingly effective ending.
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Format: Hardcover
4.5 stars.

At age 6 and 7, Hannah and Rebecca are nearly drowned in a storm. Hannah's parents are both killed, the girls rescued by Tasmanian tigers. This is the story of how they spend the next four years of their lives with two tigers in the wilds of Australia.

An adult and elderly Hannah narrates her story, her grasp of English weakened by her lack of exposure to other humans at a crucial time in her development, we come to understand.

There have been lots of books and films exploring the 'child brought up by animals/in the wild' scenario, but previous few I can name (none actually) that cover the child's point of view.

It's a fascinating story, how the girls communicate with their foster parents, how they change, one faster than the other, and how it all ends.

It's also a very sad story ultimately, with a return to civilisation the way we know it will go, but not a pleasant one.

Lovely writing, original idea.
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Format: Paperback
Weird is how I would best describe this outback story based in Tasmania. Two girls go missing after a family accident in a storm. They are rescued and befriended by Tassie tigers and for the next 4 years spend their life as tigers, so when they return to "civilisation" they obviously have problems adjusting.

Hannah is deemed a bad influence on Becky and sent away on the whalers but when she returns some time later finds that Becky has run away from her school and is missing. The final scenes whilst predictable are the most poignant. The story is told by Hannah in a type of patois.

Nothing like Boy in the Striped Pyjamas or even Life of Pi it is very graphic in its never ending descriptions of tearing animals apart and all the blood that goes with it. Not what I consider a young persons read - not that I think they'd want to read it anyway. I found myself skipping some of the interminable gory descriptions.
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Format: Hardcover
'Into That Forest' was a wonderful book, unlike anything else I've ever read before. The story takes the reader on an incredible journey through the Tasmanian outback with friends Hannah and Becky. Thoughts of this book lingered with me long after turning the final page and I'm looking forward to passing it onto others who haven't yet discovered such an amazing title.

The story is narrated by seventy-six year old Hannah, who is looking back on her early life. Nothing could prepare me for the tale she would have to tell of surviving in the wilderness with her friend Becky and two Tasmanian tigers, who she names Dave and Corinna. Not only do the girls survive but in their own way they adapt and flourish in their new environment. They become like tigers themselves, moving on all fours and shedding their human clothes, as well as taking part in the hunt for fresh meat. Isolated from contact with any other human being, they begin to forget their previous existence and become happy with their new lives.

Everything changes however when they realise that the hunters have now become the hunted. Two men are seemingly intent on capturing them and rescuing them from the tigers, but the girls do not want to return to civilisation and a new struggle ensues.

Louis Nowra depicts both the horror and the beauty of life in the outback. I enjoyed seeing how the girls adapted to life with the tigers and even began to see them as their new mother and father. The tigers in return adopt them as their own, surrogate daughters instead of the cubs which they are brutally robbed of. There's a sense of freedom throughout the first half of the book as the girls run wild, their senses sharpening as they become accustomed to the sights, sounds and smells around them.
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