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Comment: 1st edition Internally clean & bright marked down as previous owner has torn his bookplate that was stuck to front inside board !! VG black boards with a VERY GOOD unclipped D/j - Guaranteed posting 24hrs from St Ives in Cornwall St249
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Flannelled fool: A slice of life in the Thirties Hardcover – 1 Jan 1967

3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 213 pages
  • Publisher: Ross; First Edition edition (1967)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0000CNFRJ
  • Product Dimensions: 23.2 x 16.7 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 127,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Synopsis

The author recounts his experiences as a young teacher at a famous British boys' school in the thirties. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
T. C. Worsley is disarmingly -self-deprecating, in a way that is rather out of fashion now. He was brought up in what would now be considered a dysfunctional family. His father, the Dean of Llandaff, abandoned his senior post in the Church of England, his house and his family, and spent most of his time playing golf. For Worsley, his father's life and character represents the kind of ineffectuality that he desperately wants to avoid in his own life, but fears he will ineluctably become.

Worsley is clearly good at some things, particularly cricket. At his public school, Marlborough, he takes on the character of a "hearty", one who loves games and despises learning. When he goes up to Cambridge, though, he eventually comes to love English literature and spends his early adulthood trying to find a balance between the various things he loves.

He repeatedly makes it clear that he is a late maturer in many ways. He is sexually repressed, but comes to recognize that his preference is for boys. Nowadays, this would earn him nothing but obloquy, but in the less censorious 1930s, when he was a young master at "College", it was believed by some that men who are paederastically inclined sometimes make the best teachers of boys. As far as we can tell from the book, he did not have any kind of sexual contact with the boys he taught, although he was subject to insinuations of inappropriate behaviour by "the old guard", the older masters at "College".

I recognized "College" (which is how Worsley refers to the school at which he taught) as Wellington College, my alma mater.
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Format: Hardcover
Having read the review on Cuthy Worsleys' Flannelled Fool,(John B Leith, posted 2006) I feel I must disagree with the critics' comments re: Cuthys' ability to form strong lasting bonds. Having known Cuthy from a very early age I can say with confidence that his relationship with my brother, John Anthony Luscombe, was both strong and lasting, them being together for over thirty years. He also formed close bonds with myself and other family members. Mr Leith is correct, however, when he comments on Cuthys' battle with those who were bullies or whose views he found repellant.
Kay Harvey (Luscombe)
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's interesting that young men/teens were kept so ignorant of sex in the 1930's that the author didn't know what masturbation was or how to do it. He asked his father, what it was and how do you do it? The Victorian pater familiarise walked out of the room with an appalled continence. :D
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I know that I'm going to enjoy perusing this book. Fantastic, 5-star service from the seller
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