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Fatal Last Words (Bob Skinner series, Book 19): A gritty crime novel of celebrity and murder (Skinner 19) Paperback – 11 Jun 2009

4.1 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews

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Paperback, 11 Jun 2009
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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Headline (11 Jun. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755329163
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755329168
  • Product Dimensions: 15.7 x 23.4 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 911,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"Jardine excels at coordinating the multiple crimes crucial to a police procedural and setting his coppers against the clock." "Kirkus Reviews"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A thrilling mystery in the Bob Skinner series by Scotland's Crime Master

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book, well worth a visit to this author
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent read as always
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Brilliant as usual - can't wait to read next book. Keep them coming. No more words to improve what ive put .
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have followed the Skinner series all the way through and feel that the last few novels have struggled badly.

We all know that Bob Skinner is a pastiche of a super-hero. He golfs excellently despite playing irregularly; he is the star of his football team; he's a crackshot with the guns; he has incredible insight; is (naturally) an unblemished detective and is a superlative lover.

Even though we're prepared to accept all that, the plot, the relationships and the dialogue all become quite hard to bear.

The conversations are stilted. EVERY character has exactly the same speech mannerisms.

Many take 10 sentences to relate what would (by real people) be said in two. A lot of it is clumsy scene-setting where Jardine uses the characters to fill newcoming readers in on the back history. It's a device he's used in the past but it's now starting to really grate. If, in real life, a friend or colleague were to describe to me, in great detail, an event which I'd be involved in, I would quickly tire of it.

Lastly in my rant of disappointment: who, nowadays, uses the word "for" when they mean "because"?? (Apart from every character in a Quintin Jardine novel, of course!!)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A barely-credible plot, with implausible coincidences and connections; a pointless and irrelevant sub-plot involving his daughter and former best mate, and quite the most "convenient" promotion to high office.

Jardine still persists in using this awful device of having the characters speak to the reader instead of to each other. So much of the dialogue involves one character telling another things that he already knows, as a way of reminding the reader what happened in previous narratives.

This is quite the worst Skinner novel yet.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I would have considered this a good read, though not one of the best Skinner novels (I've bought them all), had it not been ruined for me once I spotted, very early on, the author's 'joke' in making this into a 'spot the crime-writer' game - totally ruining any possiblity of getting absorbed in the story. A great pity.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read the entire series - not proud of it but we all have our guilty pastimes. This is, by my lights, the most self-indulgent of the lot and one where Jardine's weaknesses overwhelm his strengths. You'll find the sudden, inexplicable (but for plot movement) changes of behaviour that his characters are prone to, the unguessable (because the author won't show you all the cards) denouement, Skinner solving it all with a "Hmmm" and a long stare into the distance... all the hallmarks of a Jardine mystery. Those are the good bits. The bad, in my view, are the over-indulgence in horribly clumsy puns, clanking meta-textual excursions, and Jardine's belief that rim-shot-accompanied, blatantly telegraphed authorial interjections will be read as light comic touches. I'll buy the next one - they don't call it a bad habit for nothing - but I do hope he sticks more firmly to action, melodrama and his well-conceived version of the real Edinburgh in future.
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Format: Paperback
I thought this episode in the Skinner saga was wonderful. I really enjoyed it and must have been reading a different book to the negative reviewers! Can't wait for the next instalment. The sub-plot with Alexis and Andy Martin was not unexpected or 'pointless' as someone commented, previous books have already revealed their history and I think this will develope in future novels. The comment about the 'convenient' promotion I found a bit odd as at least the last five books have been leading up to it and it had to happen sometime! The only reason I haven't given 5 stars is because of the silly 'spot the crime writer' game, it soon became a distraction. As soon as I came across the character called Peedy James enough was enough! If you are new to the 'Bob Skinner' novels I would recommend you start at the beginning and get to know the colourful characters.
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