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Douglas Adams (Three book set, includes The Salmon of Doubt, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul)

4.6 out of 5 stars 1,466 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 1200 pages
  • Publisher: Pan (21 Oct. 2013)
  • ISBN-10: 1447259564
  • ISBN-13: 978-1447259565
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 13 x 5.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,466 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 430,416 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 25 April 2002
Format: Hardcover
Douglas Adams once noted that there was a class of reviewer who simply took the best jokes out of a book and put them in their review. It's going to be difficult to review The Salmon of Doubt without doing that, every page has quotable lines, memorable phrases and oh-so elegant metaphors that are just sitting there waiting for a reviewer to pluck them out. I'll do my best not to.
Latterly, Douglas Adams had become as famous for not writing Hitchhikers books as for writing them in the first place. The Salmon of Doubt, a collection of essays, articles, interviews and, finally, ten chapters of his last novel, demonstrates that he'd developed his displacement activities to avoid writing into a fine art, progressing from 'taking another bath' and 'going for a walk' to coming up with some of the most elegant essays on atheism ever written and climbing Kilimanjaro to save rhinos. This is what he'd been getting up to all that time, and it was a far more interesting and productive way of occupying himself than coming up with new things for Marvin to do.
And if I haven't done so already, here's where I lapse into cliche - Douglas Adams delighted millions; created characters and phrases that have passed into everyday use; he died tragically young; he made the most complex philosophical and scientific ideas seem so simple; I never met him but he made me feel that I knew him; I laughed aloud while reading this book.
Stephen Fry's introduction is perceptive, but more importantly it's moving. Fry makes the crucial point - Adams convinced a generation of readers that he was writing just for us. The sense of loss in this, and an equally moving tribute by Richard Dawkins at the end of the book, is keen. The subtitle of the book 'Hitchhiking the galaxy for one last time' captures the excitement of the prospect of being allowed into Douglas Adams' universe once more ... but also the sadness that it genuinely will only be once more...
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Format: Hardcover
There are all sorts of reasons why The Salmon of Doubt should never have appeared. Adams himself never chose to publish his collected articles, letters and speeches, and he was patently unhappy with the way the third, unfinished, Dirk Gently novel was going - so why should anyone else take the decision to publish for him?
It's hard to justify, but I'm glad they did. Douglas Adams was always more interesting when he was writing about subjects which touched his passions, rather than taking us on the flights of fancy that made up his fiction - brilliant though that was - and perhaps more than anything Adams would have himself chosen to publish in the one place, this collection gives an insight into a constantly inquiring mind which had developed a very logical yet very human world-view. Adams' passions - rock music, Bach, conservation, atheism, missing deadlines - glow out from these pages.
The unfinished Dirk Gently novel is, perhaps, more frustrating than enlightening, stopping abruptly as it does. It seems disjointed - I'm not convinced by the way it has been edited together, but since we're not likely ever to see the source material, I can't really comment there.
The inclusion of the running order for his memorial service at the end also seems unnecessarily morbid - surely this publication should be celebrating a life rather than marking a death? But then, if Dave Gilmour was to play "Wish You Were Here" at my funeral, I think I'd want people to know about it.
Not one for those who have read no Adams, but an interesting rounding-off of a far-too-short career for the rest of us.
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Format: Kindle Edition
The spaceship was big and yellow and hung in the air in exactly the same way that bricks don't.

Assembled in one giant bundle of wordplay are all five books in Douglas Adams' magnificent trilogy investigating life, the universe and everything. Simply put they are the funniest books ever written and the great tragedy is that their creator, Douglas Adams, went to his grave leaving us with just a handful of treasures by which to remember him.

You know the plot: the world is going to be destroyed by vogons - Arthur Dent, a man in a dressing gown, survives the conglagration and explores the universe. Meanwhile someone else works out the meaning of life and some mice think they know what is happening. And we all know the answer - it's 42! That is not a spoiler. What happens next might be.
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Format: Leather Bound
This is a fairly nice edition: a tough padded hardback, printed on gilt-egded paper which one might normally expect to see on a bible. This is quite thin, however, and the print shows through slightly from behind each page which is not an altogether bad thing, since the five novels are comprising the hitch-hiker "trilogy" form a volume about two-and-a-half inches thick. Good travel reading, in other words.

(The "story," by the way, is a tale about Zaphod's youth, and is also printed in the sadly unfinished Dirk Gently novel " The Salmon of Doubt.")

The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an undisputed classic of modern literature, and this is its definative edition, wrapping up the many incarnations of the Guide. Adams himself states that it is the purpose of the book to "set the record straight, or at least, firmly crooked." This is an excellent book, and and printed in a very nice edition. At the price it's an absolute steal.
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