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The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick) Paperback – 26 Jul 2007

4.0 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews

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  • The Dip: The extraordinary benefits of knowing when to quit (and when to stick)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Piatkus (26 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749928301
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749928308
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 0.8 x 19.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 11,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"A short read that should be on every entrepreneur's book list."--Entrepreneur.com
"Absolutely delightful, combining his wise aphorisms and anecdotes with Hugh MacLeod's darkly brilliant business-card cartoons."--Chris Anderson, author of The Long Tail --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Know when to leave your job or relationship and when to stick at it. For fans of The Tipping Point and The Long Tail.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
It is impossible to ignore what Seth Godin has to say and how he says it. That's remarkable. In this small volume (only 80 pages and about the size of a greeting card), Godin shares some LARGE ideas, one of which is indicated in the title of my review. Here is a cluster of Godinesque observations:

All our successes are the same. All our failures, too.
We succeed when we do something remarkable.
We fail when we give up too soon.
We succeed when we are the best in the world at what we do.
We fail when we get distracted by tasks we don't have the guts to quick.
Quit the wrong stuff.
Stick with the right stuff.
Have the guts to do one or the other.

In 1963, Peter Drucker made an assertion with which Seth Godin presumably agrees: "There is surely nothing quite so useless as doing with great efficiency what should not be done at all."

Both Drucker and Grodin are diehard pragmatists. My guess (only a guess) is that each learned lessons of greatest value to them from their failures rather than from their successes, that both of them (at least occasionally) felt like giving up and sometimes did, making a bad decision by quitting "the right stuff" or sticking with "the wrong stuff."

I presume to offer an example of what Godin seems to have in mind. All of us begin each day with the best of intentions. Let's say our objective is to produce more and better results in less time. OK, that's a worthy objective. Then let's say, that doesn't happen. Perhaps how we pursue the objective isn't working but we don't quit our method. (Albert Einstein once suggested that insanity is "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
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Format: Hardcover
Do you remember starting something new that interested you? Chances are the world seemed a little brighter, a little more inviting, and your smile was a little wider that day.

Now, remember how that same activity seemed after six months had passed. It's likely you weren't having as much fun; progress was hard to accomplish; and frustration was starting to build. That's what a dip feels like.

That sequence is the normal experience and psychology of creating worthwhile results.

But in some cases, you are headed for a dead end where results will never amount to much (if you ever see me play golf, you'll know what I'm talking about). In rarer cases, results just keep going downhill forever (if you've seen me run lately, you'll get the idea).

Many people make mistakes when "the going gets tough."

1. Some will keep going even though future results won't reward the effort (such as those who keep trying to master something for which they have little ability). This behavior is usually the result of bad habits (like always following tradition . . . or existing beliefs) I call "stalls" that harm progress.

2. Others will quit before they break through into improvements that make an enormous difference (going through a dip) and miss the chance to get great benefits from continuing, well-focused effort. The "best in the world" (or "best in your corner of the world") will get a disproportionate share of the benefits from what everyone does. Who is going to pay much attention to the 1,000,001 ranked book reviewer on Amazon? People who behave this way are usually suffering from the procrastination, bureaucracy, ugly duckling or disbelief stalls (see The 2,000 Percent Solution).

In past books by Mr.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Now, there is a point to this book. That knowing when to quit and quitting things that should be quitted is very useful. However, that would take a page and a half. The rest of the eighty odd pages of this book is taken up with examples, some arguable, of people and organisations that benefit from doing this well, but absolutely NOTHING about how to determine when it's right to quit or how to apply the idea.

This might be good as a motivational talk given by those management insultants that do such things, you know ,when you're fired up in the room, go outside and think "that was great" then "but what did he actually say", finally realising you've been had.

One star for sure.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Basically is an aspect of your life a dip or a cul-de-sac. Once you have decided, then you know whether to quit or continue. This is the idea which is expanded and repeated throughout the book, nothing more.

I wouldnt recommend this and certainly wouldnt pass it around my work place as the author suggests. For some who are indecisive this may be useful, but if you were proactive enough to think about buying the book in the first place, it probably wont teach you anything.
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Format: Paperback
I'm new to the world of Seth, so don't know how The Dip compares to his other publications, but have already recommended this handy little book to several friends. He's right in that we're - wrongly - taught that quitting is always bad - a shameful thing that only weak people do. As a result, all too often - and for too long - freelancers like me stick with ways of working that just aren't... working! We need to take the stigma out of quitting and realise that there are times when it is the smart thing to do. Is what you're facing a 'blip' - or is your plan flawed in some way that wasn't immediately obvious when you started out? I'm not a businessperson but would recommend this to other freelance writers like me, plus to friends who are photographers, illustrators etc who have - after early success and a buzz around their name - become stuck in a hand-to-mouth existence that stopped being fun - and lucrative! - long ago... Yes, the Dip is a smidge repetitive, but if you're stubborn enough to need to read this book, you're probably the kind of person who needs things drummed into you! By the end, I'd got the message. Since then, I've acted on the advice and feel much clearer on where I'm going now.
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