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The Dark Tower VI: Song of Susannah: (Volume 6) Paperback – 16 Feb 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 157 customer reviews

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Frequently bought together

  • The Dark Tower VI: Song of Susannah: (Volume 6)
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  • The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower: (Volume 7)
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  • The Dark Tower V: Wolves of the Calla: (Volume 5)
Total price: £26.95
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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (16 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444723499
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444723496
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 3.1 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (157 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,608 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Amazon Review

Song of Susannah continues directly from the almost literally cliff-hanging epilogue to Wolves of the Calla. As ever with such series, this is not the place to begin and new readers are strongly advised to start with volume one, The Gunslinger.

Meanwhile the penultimate instalment in the Dark Tower septet follows three interlocked storylines. Roland and Eddie in New England, where they undergo the firestorm of the book’s only major action set-piece, Jake and Father Callahan hot in pursuit of Susannah in New York, and Susannah herself, together with her alter ego Mia, struggling with probably the strangest pregnancy in all fiction. Her travails certainly make the New York horrors of Ira Levin’s Rosemary’s Baby seem almost mundane. The novel is not complete in itself, but leads to a duel climax-cliffhanger leading directly into the final volume, The Dark Tower.

While the journey itself is compelling and the finale riveting, it is Stephen King’s imaginative boldness which make this episode so remarkable. Stories about storytelling have become increasingly common in modern fiction, with books within books and fictional authors being central to such metafictions as Christopher Priest’s The Affirmation and Jonathan Carroll’s The Land of Laughs. King though takes the process further, writing himself into the saga, playing ingenious games with what the public knows of his life, even to his famous near fatal accident in 1999, and in a breathtaking achievement weaving the 34 year long writing of this series of books into its own fabric. The shocking sting in the final pages mean all bets are off for the epic final volume.--Gary Dalkin --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

King's magnificent uberstory is finally complete... King's achievement is startling; his characters fresh... his plot sharply drawn... It is magic. (Daily Express on THE DARK TOWER)

Join the quest before it's too late (Independent on Sunday on SONG OF SUSANNAH)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not sure what to make of this book. King has included himself in his own book. Why? I am really not sure about that at all. Imagine if Tolkien had written himself into Lord of the Rings. Apart from his appearance it was pretty good. I will read the last book to find out what happens.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Once you get into the dark tower series you find it difficult to put them down,but start from book one.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great series of books. I can't remember the last time I've been this hooked on a series of books. Stephen Kings imagination is unparalleled.
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Format: Paperback
The Unsung Hero of Stephen Kings Considerable Talent:
Wow. What can I say? I didn't read this collection because having read Stephen's entire catalogue, I didn't see what amounts to a very long Western {I avoid Westerns like the plague usually} adventure, could possibly add to the mix. I couldn't be more wrong! I've read all of the Gunslinger volumes now, including the post conclusion addition Wind Through The Keyhole and I am once again left in awe. The way Stephen has written these tales weaves Cowboy Roland Deschain, Ex-druggie Eddie Dean, profoundly injured but in no way Disabled Susanna Dean and young but no Child Jake Chambers and their wonderfully intricately painted {That way Stephen has of creating live images of every tiny detail the through words} surroundings in to your imagination and in this case, your heart, is nothing less than breathtaking! When I am reading these books, I'm in love with Mr Deschain and the other characters feel like well loved members of my own family. I feel like I could walk out of my house and down the road and I will stumble into an arid wasteland populated by tumbleweeds, cowpokes and old world Sheriffs who wield huge nickel plated revolvers and drink themselves silly in the local tavern every evening to drown out the harshness of their daily lives. These stories are written so well you feel like you almost could be there. It's shocking how totally immersed one can get into the dreamscapes of another's very clever imagination.
I recommend you read these if you like John Wayne, or not. Read them if you've been avoiding them because they might be a little bit too far from Stephens usual work, because they're not.
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Format: Hardcover
Stephen King is approaching the end of the path leading to the Dark Tower. This sixth and last but one volume is phenomenal. It is the story of Susannah, who has been hijacked by some primitive spirit, who has been impregnated with a child during a rape in some stone circle, when she moves towards her delivery. It has to happen in New York in 1999. Susannah is thus taken by force, or nearly, to the Big Apple that looks like a big blood pie. The other members of her gunslinger ka-tet are following, plus the priest from Salem's Lot. And all of them are back in New York or in Maine, at different times and at in different places with different missions. Mia, the evil spirit, leads a game that she does not control. Her leadership is thus vain and blind. She is the prey and the prisoner of the Crimson King who wants her child, not really hers in fact, to achieve his destructive project against the beams that support the Dark Tower and the whole world. But the book is phenomenal because it brings together a great number of lines from other books by Stephen King. It is a real multiple crossroads and roundabout of a good dozen of his previous novels. This gives some perspective to his whole writing history. So many books have dealt with the theme of the bad guy who is trying to destroy the world. Evil versus good. But the good side is no choirboy : they are also able, the gunslingers, to kill innocent people if necessary. They are some kind of levelling machine that flattens everything and everyone that stands in their way. There is no stopping them. The chase is irresistible. Stephen King seems to want to give the key to his whole writing career and work. But Stephen King also goes one iota further in his obsession about the relationship between himself and his characters.Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
Stephen King's Song of Susannah is the sixth in his epic Dark Tower series. It follows directly from the end of Wolves of the Calla. As the villagers deal with the aftermath of their battle, Eddie plans to follow Susannah/Mia, and one of the beams that holds the Dark Tower in place finally snaps.
The strength of the narrative is how the characters have divided loyalties: to find Calvin Tower and persuade him to sell the lot containing the Rose to the 'Tet-corporation' and protect the Tower, or deal with the affair of the heart and find Susannah.
However, this conflict means the narrative is split three ways: there is little interaction between the groups and the story becomes three separate narratives, with Susannah, not surprisingly, the primary focus. The story mostly takes place our world in 1975 and 1999. Roland and Eddie leave the story around page 314, while Jake and Callahan really only have forty pages to themselves. Each of these three threads ends with a sense of anticipation for the final novel.
The story does carry the narrative forward - to a point. Song of Susannah answers some questions, most particularly, the surprising revelation of who the father of Susannah/Mia's baby is, and some remarkable characterisation of the internal conflict between the multiple personalities. Also, very impressive is the gradual transformation of Jake, becoming more like Roland following the death of Benny Stillman.
There are some disappointments within the story: one of the strengths of the earlier volumes was the gradual revelation through the retrospective view on the revolution and the fall of Gilead - there is none of that in this volume.
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