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The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin) Paperback – 26 Sep 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Publisher: Egmont; New edition edition (26 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405206160
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405206167
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 0.5 x 29.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 16,624 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

Hergé  (Georges Remi) was born in Brussels in 1907. Over the course of 54 years he completed 23 albums of The Adventures of Tintin series, which is now considered to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, comics series of all time. With translations published in over 80 languages, more than 230 million copies sold worldwide and a Hollywood movie to its name, Tintin dominates the Comics and Graphic Novels chart even today. Sadly, Hergé died in 1983, leaving his 24th album, Tintin and Alph-Art, unfinished, but his hero continues to be one of the most iconic characters in both adult and children’s fiction.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
"The Blue Lotus" begins where "Cigars of the Pharaoh" left off, with Tintin and Snowy in India as the guests of the Maharaja of Gaipajama. The evil gang of international drug smugglers had been smashed and all of them are now behind bars except for the mysterious leader, who disappeared over a cliff. A visitor from Shanghai is hit with a dart dipped in Rajaijah juice, the poison of madness, which is enough to send our intrepid hero to the Chinese city where his rickshaw runs into Gibson, an occidental who is not looking where he is going and starts beating the rickshaw driver for daring to barge into a white man. Tintin intervenes, calling the man's conduct disgraceful and Gibson vows revenge. The next thing we know Tintin is being shot at every time he turns around. Things become even more mysterious when another bystander is hit with a Rajaijah dart and Tintin embarks on a ship for Bombay only to wake up in the home of Wang Chen-yee, who begins to unravel the mystery for our hero.

This Tintin adventure was first published in Belgium in 1934-35, although the story is actually set in 1931, which was when Japanese troops were first occupying parts of China. Shanghai, the great northern seaport on the Yangtze river, had an International Settlement that served as a trading base for Western nations. Hergé incoprorates several actual events in this narrative, including the blowing-up of the South Manchurian railway, which served as an excuse for further Japanese incursions into China, and led to Japan walking out on the League of Nations.
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Format: Paperback
In Tintin's fifth adventure Hergé gives his readers a first small but welcome taste of continuity and grander plot-structuring, starting the story with Tintin in India, and picking up some of the threads of the last adventure, Cigars of the Pharoah. Whilst not quite as fully realised an idea as it will later become, this gently points the way to the later run of two-part adventures.

There's also some continuity in terms of characters, with Rastopopolous (who debuted in the previous adventure) reappearing, and two new characters who will recur later in Tintin's adventures making their entry, namely Dawson (here police chief in the international settlement in Shanghai, and cropping up again later as an arms dealer in The Red Sea Sharks), and Chang, who Tintin will search for in Tibet.

Whilst the artwork is still not Hergé's best, it is improving (although the extensive redraws the series went through by Hergé and his team make this aspect harder to track accurately), as is his storytelling prowess. This said, he falls back on Tintin's war against drug-smuggling again, as a central plot theme, but at least the transparently patched together episodic nature of his adventures in Africa and America is replaced by a more structured narrative.

Hergé' and/or Tintin's relationship to other races and cultures remains a little tricky in places, but he's making improvements.
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Format: Hardcover
~This story is very well thought out and neatly presented, the artwork is great and characters are drawn accuratly with a lot of detail put in. Most comic books are nowhere near up to this standard. The overall plot is much better than the average Tintin story.
The bad guys mean serious bussiness and Tintin actually gets captured and for a moment you think the young reporter has had it when he's about to get beheaded towards the end.(not to give to much away!)Its only thanks to his friend~~ Chang that he escapes. So not all of this is about Tintin being lucky and having success every time like so many other stories. (ei - Tintin In America)
Enjoyable all the way through and suitable for all ages. In my opinion its the best Tintin book.~
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Format: Paperback
"The Blue Lotus" begins where "Cigars of the Pharaoh" left off, with Tintin and Snowy in India as the guests of the Maharaja of Gaipajama. The evil gang of international drug smugglers had been smashed and all of them are now behind bars except for the mysterious leader, who disappeared over a cliff. A visitor from Shanghai is hit with a dart dipped in Rajaijah juice, the poison of madness, which is enough to send our interipd hero to the Chinese city where his rickshaw runs into Gibsons, an occiental who is not looking where he is going and starts beating the rickshaw driver for daring to barge into a white man. Tintin intervenes, calling the man's conduct disgraceful and Gibbon vows revenge. The next thing we know Tintin is being shot at every time he turns around. Things become even more mysterious when another bystander is hit with a Rajaijah dart and Tintin embarks on a ship for Bombay only to wake up in the home of Wang Chen-yee, who begins to unravel the mystery for our hero.
This Tintin adventure was first published in Belgium in 1934-35, although the story is actually set in 1931, which was when Japanese troops were first occupying parts of China. Shangai, the great northern seaport on the Yangtze river, had an International Settlement that served as a trading base for Western nations. Hergé incoprorates several actual events in this narrative, including the blowing-up of the South Manchurian railway, which served as an excuse for further Japanese incursions into China, and led to Japan walking out on the League of Nations.
Read more ›
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