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The Affect Theory Reader Paperback – 12 Nov 2010

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Review

“"The Affect Theory Reader" is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject.”—Erin Manning, author of "Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty"

“Written by some of the most interesting and important thinkers in the field, the essays in this superb collection prove how any serious consideration of culture and politics needs to involve serious attention to affect. "The Affect Theory Reader" covers remarkable ground: from the ontology of ‘future threat’ in Bush’s preemptive politics to the management of workplace affects in the information economy; from the biology of human mimicry to attachments to promises of the ‘good life’ that often cruelly wear out economically precarious subjects. Thoughtfully curated and genuinely interdisciplinary, with contributors from fields ranging from media studies to geography, Melissa Gregg’s and Gregory J. Seigworth’s reader will be indispensable to anyone working in or adjacent to affect theory.”—Sianne Ngai, author of "Ugly Feelings"

""The Affect Theory Reader" is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject."--Erin Manning, author of "Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty"

""The Affect Theory Reader "is . . . a very valuable resource: it presents essays
in conversation in such a way as to provoke further discussion, to hone various definitions and approaches to affect. Gregg and Seigworth frame the conversations in such a way as to draw out the differences between approaches, and their substantial introduction serves as an apt survey of current work. . . . Gregg and Seigworth have assembled an impressive collection of essays and, in their introduction, certainly recognize the limits and scope of such a project. The work is impressive and will certainly catalyze further development in affect theory across disciplines."--Russ Leo, "Reviews in Cultural Theory"

The Affect Theory Reader is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject. Erin Manning, author of Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty"

Written by some of the most interesting and important thinkers in the field, the essays in this superb collection prove how any serious consideration of culture and politics needs to involve serious attention to affect. The Affect Theory Reader covers remarkable ground: from the ontology of future threat in Bush s preemptive politics to the management of workplace affects in the information economy; from the biology of human mimicry to attachments to promises of the good life that often cruelly wear out economically precarious subjects. Thoughtfully curated and genuinely interdisciplinary, with contributors from fields ranging from media studies to geography, Melissa Gregg s and Gregory J. Seigworth s reader will be indispensable to anyone working in or adjacent to affect theory. Sianne Ngai, author of Ugly Feelings"

The Affect Theory Reader is . . . a very valuable resource: it presents essays
in conversation in such a way as to provoke further discussion, to hone various definitions and approaches to affect. Gregg and Seigworth frame the conversations in such a way as to draw out the differences between approaches, and their substantial introduction serves as an apt survey of current work. . . . Gregg and Seigworth have assembled an impressive collection of essays and, in their introduction, certainly recognize the limits and scope of such a project. The work is impressive and will certainly catalyze further development in affect theory across disciplines. --Russ Leo "Reviews in Cultural Theory ""

As the first definitive collection of essays on affect studies, The Affect Theory Reader demonstrates how the affective turn in academia has been, and continues to be felt, throughout a variety of disciplines. --Marcie Bianco "Elevate Difference ""

While a reader of the book might be left less rather than more sure of what precisely constitutes affect theory, or even affect itself, s/he is nevertheless very likely to be moved by the range of both thought and affective styles that make up the volume and constitute what the editors call in the introduction, an inventory of shimmers (p11). This incitement to more than discourse,
the capacity to touch, to move, to mobilise readers (p24) is exactly what one would hope for from a reader of affect theory, and is what the contributions that make up this collection indeed achieve. --Michael Goddard "New Formations ""

"The Affect Theory Reader is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject."--Erin Manning, author of Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty

"Written by some of the most interesting and important thinkers in the field, the essays in this superb collection prove how any serious consideration of culture and politics needs to involve serious attention to affect. The Affect Theory Reader covers remarkable ground: from the ontology of 'future threat' in Bush's preemptive politics to the management of workplace affects in the information economy; from the biology of human mimicry to attachments to promises of the 'good life' that often cruelly wear out economically precarious subjects. Thoughtfully curated and genuinely interdisciplinary, with contributors from fields ranging from media studies to geography, Melissa Gregg's and Gregory J. Seigworth's reader will be indispensable to anyone working in or adjacent to affect theory."--Sianne Ngai, author of Ugly Feelings

-The Affect Theory Reader is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject.---Erin Manning, author of Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty

-Written by some of the most interesting and important thinkers in the field, the essays in this superb collection prove how any serious consideration of culture and politics needs to involve serious attention to affect. The Affect Theory Reader covers remarkable ground: from the ontology of 'future threat' in Bush's preemptive politics to the management of workplace affects in the information economy; from the biology of human mimicry to attachments to promises of the 'good life' that often cruelly wear out economically precarious subjects. Thoughtfully curated and genuinely interdisciplinary, with contributors from fields ranging from media studies to geography, Melissa Gregg's and Gregory J. Seigworth's reader will be indispensable to anyone working in or adjacent to affect theory.---Sianne Ngai, author of Ugly Feelings

-The Affect Theory Reader is . . . a very valuable resource: it presents essays
in conversation in such a way as to provoke further discussion, to hone various definitions and approaches to affect. Gregg and Seigworth frame the conversations in such a way as to draw out the differences between approaches, and their substantial introduction serves as an apt survey of current work. . . . Gregg and Seigworth have assembled an impressive collection of essays and, in their introduction, certainly recognize the limits and scope of such a project. The work is impressive and will certainly catalyze further development in affect theory across disciplines.---Russ Leo -Reviews in Cultural Theory -

-As the first definitive collection of essays on affect studies, The Affect Theory Reader demonstrates how the affective turn in academia has been, and continues to be felt, throughout a variety of disciplines.---Marcie Bianco -Elevate Difference -

-While a reader of the book might be left less rather than more sure of what precisely constitutes 'affect theory', or even affect itself, s/he is nevertheless very likely to be moved by the range of both thought and affective styles that make up the volume and constitute what the editors call in the introduction, an 'inventory of shimmers' (p11). This incitement to 'more than discourse',
the capacity 'to touch, to move, to mobilise readers' (p24) is exactly what one would hope for from a reader of affect theory, and is what the contributions that make up this collection indeed achieve.---Michael Goddard -New Formations -

"The Affect Theory Reader is . . . a very valuable resource: it presents essays
in conversation in such a way as to provoke further discussion, to hone various definitions and approaches to affect. Gregg and Seigworth frame the conversations in such a way as to draw out the differences between approaches, and their substantial introduction serves as an apt survey of current work. . . . Gregg and Seigworth have assembled an impressive collection of essays and, in their introduction, certainly recognize the limits and scope of such a project. The work is impressive and will certainly catalyze further development in affect theory across disciplines."--Russ Leo "Reviews in Cultural Theory "

"As the first definitive collection of essays on affect studies, The Affect Theory Reader demonstrates how the affective turn in academia has been, and continues to be felt, throughout a variety of disciplines."--Marcie Bianco "Elevate Difference "

"While a reader of the book might be left less rather than more sure of what precisely constitutes 'affect theory', or even affect itself, s/he is nevertheless very likely to be moved by the range of both thought and affective styles that make up the volume and constitute what the editors call in the introduction, an 'inventory of shimmers' (p11). This incitement to 'more than discourse',
the capacity 'to touch, to move, to mobilise readers' (p24) is exactly what one would hope for from a reader of affect theory, and is what the contributions that make up this collection indeed achieve."--Michael Goddard "New Formations "

Review

The Affect Theory Reader is . . . a very valuable resource: it presents essays
in conversation in such a way as to provoke further discussion, to hone various definitions and approaches to affect. Gregg and Seigworth frame the conversations in such a way as to draw out the differences between approaches, and their substantial introduction serves as an apt survey of current work. . . . Gregg and Seigworth have assembled an impressive collection of essays and, in their introduction, certainly recognize the limits and scope of such a project. The work is impressive and will certainly catalyze further development in affect theory across disciplines.” - Russ Leo, Reviews in Cultural Theory


“As the first definitive collection of essays on affect studies, The Affect Theory Reader demonstrates how the affective turn in academia has been, and continues to be felt, throughout a variety of disciplines.” - Marcie Bianco, Elevate Difference


“While a reader of the book might be left less rather than more sure of what precisely constitutes ‘affect theory’, or even affect itself, s/he is nevertheless very likely to be moved by the range of both thought and affective styles that make up the volume and constitute what the editors call in the introduction, an ‘inventory of shimmers’ (p11). This incitement to ‘more than discourse’,
the capacity ‘to touch, to move, to mobilise readers’ (p24) is exactly what one would hope for from a reader of affect theory, and is what the contributions that make up this collection indeed achieve.” - Michael Goddard, New Formations


The Affect Theory Reader is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject.”—Erin Manning, author of Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty


“Written by some of the most interesting and important thinkers in the field, the essays in this superb collection prove how any serious consideration of culture and politics needs to involve serious attention to affect. The Affect Theory Reader covers remarkable ground: from the ontology of ‘future threat’ in Bush’s preemptive politics to the management of workplace affects in the information economy; from the biology of human mimicry to attachments to promises of the ‘good life’ that often cruelly wear out economically precarious subjects. Thoughtfully curated and genuinely interdisciplinary, with contributors from fields ranging from media studies to geography, Melissa Gregg’s and Gregory J. Seigworth’s reader will be indispensable to anyone working in or adjacent to affect theory.”—Sianne Ngai, author of Ugly Feelings


The Affect Theory Reader is . . . a very valuable resource: it presents essays

in conversation in such a way as to provoke further discussion, to hone various definitions and approaches to affect. Gregg and Seigworth frame the conversations in such a way as to draw out the differences between approaches, and their substantial introduction serves as an apt survey of current work. . . . Gregg and Seigworth have assembled an impressive collection of essays and, in their introduction, certainly recognize the limits and scope of such a project. The work is impressive and will certainly catalyze further development in affect theory across disciplines.”
(Russ Leo Reviews in Cultural Theory)

“As the first definitive collection of essays on affect studies, The Affect Theory Reader demonstrates how the affective turn in academia has been, and continues to be felt, throughout a variety of disciplines.”
(Marcie Bianco Elevate Difference)

“While a reader of the book might be left less rather than more sure of what precisely constitutes ‘affect theory’, or even affect itself, s/he is nevertheless very likely to be moved by the range of both thought and affective styles that make up the volume and constitute what the editors call in the introduction, an ‘inventory of shimmers’ (p11). This incitement to ‘more than discourse’,

the capacity ‘to touch, to move, to mobilise readers’ (p24) is exactly what one would hope for from a reader of affect theory, and is what the contributions that make up this collection indeed achieve.”
(Michael Goddard New Formations)

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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and Revelatory 20 April 2014
By Terence Kuch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As an outsider (several degrees, but none in psychology) I found this collection of essays brilliant and revelatory. It brought to mind several of the emotional quandaries I've had for many years, and provided clues to an answer. Without thinking about it much, I had assumed that "affect" was another word for "emotion," but affect turns out to be more basic. Here's a useful definition from p.316 (Lawrence Grossberg): "... I am not sure that emotions can simply be described as affect, even as configurations of affect. I have always held that emotion is the articulation of affect and ideology. Emotion is the ideological attempt to make sense of some affective productions.”
The chapter "Cruel Optimism" by Lauren Berlant is especially brilliant, and the reader might want to start there.
That said, the prose can be tough going for the non-specialist, e.g., "Preemption's logical regress from actual fact makes for a disjointedness between its legitimating discourse and the objective content of the present context, which its affirmations ostensibly reference." But the reward is worth the struggle.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun! Great intro 24 Oct. 2015
By Brian Kumm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fun! Great intro. Great refrain. Lots of nice, lovely essays!
4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Gibberish 22 May 2016
By Karen K. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Pure, unintelligible gibberish. So bad it's kind of funny (like a certain kind of horror movie). The various authors use the term "affect" to signify different concepts. It doesn't shine a very impressive light on Affect Theory.
10 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Resource, Good Overview 6 Mar. 2012
By K - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The editors generously and transparently lay out their relationship to affect theory and to the making of this reader. There are a wide range of essays inside, so you can pick and choose what seems relevant or accessible to you for a given context. I appreciated having this in my collection.
19 of 47 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Affect Theory Reader (kindle fire edition) 2 Sept. 2012
By jennifer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I needed this book for a class, so I thought it would be a good purchase for my kindle fire and it is. The only problem I have is that there are no page numbers and therefore no way for me to cite this item. So if you are a student thinking to lighten your totebag load be warned this is not fornatted like a book so you can't cite it.
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