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Abe Sapien: Dark and Terrible and the New Race of Man Paperback – 24 Dec 2013

3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse; 01 edition (24 Dec. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1616552840
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616552848
  • Product Dimensions: 16.9 x 0.7 x 25.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 552,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Abe Sapien, Volume 3 follows BPRD, Hell on Earth Vol 7: A Cold Day in Hell, but if you can’t be bothered to read that book (and I don’t blame you) all you need to know is 1) Abe’s woken up from his coma and has escaped BPRD HQ, 2) he’s mutated so he looks even less human than before, and 3) weird Lovecraftian monsters have woken up from beneath the ground and are wreaking havoc on the world.

The first of the two stories is Dark and Terrible which follows Abe’s exodus (remember that odd game?) into the new world and takes him to a church in a small town. He tries to figure out the meaning behind his physical transformation and sees the way things have changed peoples’ minds - is this a biblical event? Is he an angel or the next step in evolution?

The second story, The New Race of Man, has Abe visit the Salton Sea to find answers to his new mutation and whether he’s somehow tied into everything that’s happening. Some people have taken to worshipping the monster embryos, believing they’re here to save humanity from itself and turn the planet back into a paradise.

The problem with BPRD is that it’s this massive, Roland Emmerich-style disaster movie and it’s just as shallow. Big monsters tearing down cities with “characters” running around firing weapons - it’s dull as hell. Why Abe Sapien’s solo series works much better is that it zeroes in on the people amidst the monsters/chaos and looks at their stories.

The best parts of the book are when Abe’s interacting with ordinary people: the bums on the train carriage sharing horror stories as Abe sits in the shadows, listening quietly or the young backpacking couple and their misfit friend, the three of them trying to find their place in this strange new world.
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Format: Paperback
At the end of BPRD: Gods, the young psychic Fenix pulled a gun on Abraham Sapien and shot hm in the throat. Abe has been in a coma ever since, until climactic earthquakes in North America at the end of BPRD: Return of the Master finally shook him awake. Now he's on the run, trying to find his way in this awful new world, wondering at the reason for his continued evolution and just what part he has to play, if any, in the apocalypse...

I'll admit I sighed inwardly when I heard the Mignola-verse was getting ANOTHER ongoing series in the form of Abe Sapien's solo spin-off from the BPRD. Generally the quality of all these tales is quite high, but between Hellboy, BPRD: Hell on Earth, the BPRD prequels, Witchfinder, Lobster Johnson, and Sledgehammer 44, the 'verse is pretty over-saturated already. It's becoming an expensive and laborious task just to keep up with them all. Abe Sapien succeeds despite this because of two key factors: 1)It's something unique and 2) It's very good.

It earns its wings by being something altogether different to the other ongoing titles. Cutting Abe loose from the Beaureau shrinks the focus down to great effect. While it's left to the BPRD guys to worry about the ongoing apocalypse and which city has fallen this week, Abe (and we the reader) get to hear how the changed state of the world is affecting the man on the street. It's a world of migrant populations, of wild rumour and urban myth, and a constant death toll that has almost become white noise. This ground-zero view of the new world is fascinating, and not an aspect we've seen in any of the other series - it's also essential in making the universe seems a three-dimensional, living place.

And, as mentioned, it's really very good. Better than some of the main BPRD tales we've had lately.
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By Squirr-El HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on 5 Oct. 2016
Format: Paperback
Abe Sapien: Dark and Terrible and the New Race of Man collects issues #1-5 of the latest Abe Sapien ongoing series, following on from events in the main BPRD title during B.P.R.D. Hell on Earth Volume 7: A Cold Day in Hell.

There are two stories in this volume, a three- and a two-parter, though they flow on from each other. This is the beginning of a quest of sorts by Abe for a meaning to his existence. As he travels through the devastated countryside of the USA, initially pursued by the BPRD, who he has absconded from, he meets various groups of people who are trying to cope with the horrors that have erupted across the world, and many of them look to him as someone who can either explain what is going on, or simply as a person of power. Abe himself doesn’t accept this, and usually has to struggle with these various groups as he looks for his own answers.

This is an entertaining volume, with excellent artwork, though the story does stretch out for quite a few volumes more before we appear to be heading to, well, something.
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Format: Kindle Edition
A really enjoyable volume that deals with the end of the world in a much more intimate way than the BPRD comics. I also didn't even notice until finishing that two artists worked on a story each, as Sebastian and Max Fiumara's art styles are so similar, but this works in the books favour as the change between artists is pretty much imperceptible and this adds to the flow of the story.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it 19 Aug. 2014
By Louis Branco - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love where the series is going and how it's coinciding with BPRD: Hell on Earth. Looking forward to the next one.
5.0 out of 5 stars Great adventure , 25 Jun. 2014
By ben sells - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
is by far one of my favorite Dark Horse series a.must read for any Fans of BPRD or Hellboy on to the next book
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Maybe too grand in scope?? 30 Dec. 2013
By Elizabeth C. Stege - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This one feels really incomplete, it is hard to figure what is going on if you have not read enough of BPRD to be caught up on the whole frog thing, and I just plain like BPRD stories that are more self contained in general. The other 2 Ape Sapien books stood on their own much better, I thought, and I liked them more.

Still, pretty solid work; the art is lovely, I like the sketchbook stuff in the back, etc. If your preference is for big arc with lots of consequences, or if you have read all the other war on frogs stuff and you like it, then you may like this book more than I did.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dark and mediocre - the new Abe Sapien series 24 Mar. 2014
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Abe Sapien, Volume 3 follows BPRD, Hell on Earth Vol 7: A Cold Day in Hell, but if you can’t be bothered to read that book (and I don’t blame you) all you need to know is 1) Abe’s woken up from his coma and has escaped BPRD HQ, 2) he’s mutated so he looks even less human than before, and 3) weird Lovecraftian monsters have woken up from beneath the ground and are wreaking havoc on the world.

The first of the two stories is Dark and Terrible which follows Abe’s exodus (remember that odd game?) into the new world and takes him to a church in a small town. He tries to figure out the meaning behind his physical transformation and sees the way things have changed peoples’ minds - is this a biblical event? Is he an angel or the next step in evolution?

The second story, The New Race of Man, has Abe visit the Salton Sea to find answers to his new mutation and whether he’s somehow tied into everything that’s happening. Some people have taken to worshipping the monster embryos, believing they’re here to save humanity from itself and turn the planet back into a paradise.

The problem with BPRD is that it’s this massive, Roland Emmerich-style disaster movie and it’s just as shallow. Big monsters tearing down cities with “characters” running around firing weapons - it’s dull as hell. Why Abe Sapien’s solo series works much better is that it zeroes in on the people amidst the monsters/chaos and looks at their stories.

The best parts of the book are when Abe’s interacting with ordinary people: the bums on the train carriage sharing horror stories as Abe sits in the shadows, listening quietly or the young backpacking couple and their misfit friend, the three of them trying to find their place in this strange new world. The worst parts of the book are when things become BPRD-esque, when giant monsters start laying waste to towns, etc. I take strong characters over mindless action any day of the week.

And Abe is one of the strongest characters in the Hellboy universe. Why BPRD doesn’t work as well is that it’s filled with dispensable nobodies; Abe’s series works because it’s about Abe Sapien, a brilliant and fully-formed character who changes, whose new appearance as an even less human looking creature only further emphasises how more human he can be compared to some of the human characters he encounters. He’s compassionate and understanding in the face of prejudice, fear and hatred, and that’s why readers love and admire this guy - the character has character.

So why only a lukewarm reaction to this book? Well, I think Mignola and co. have hit upon the best method for writing Abe but haven’t chosen to discard the stuff that doesn’t work: the parts where Abe’s laying low, figuring things out, finding clues and talking to people - that’s what I’d like the series to be. Unfortunately Mignola’s storytelling is still wired into the Hellboy method where he figures the reader won’t be entertained unless their hero is seen punching monsters, etc. so we have to endure tedious action scenes where we see Abe do just that. It doesn’t add to the book and Abe really isn’t like Hellboy so its a bit awkward and if these parts were removed entirely, Abe Sapien would be a really tremendous series.

But they’re getting there. There are some brilliant parts and some much less brilliant parts alongside one another, but the ground-level approach to the apocalypse in Abe Sapien Vol 3 is a much more interesting and effective way of telling that story than in other titles. And hey, if you’re an Abe fan, there’s plenty enough here for you to enjoy.
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