Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The complete herbal

4.4 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 605 pages
  • Publisher: Imperial Chemical (Pharmaceuticals) (1953)
  • ASIN: B0000CIP5P
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

Nicholas Culpeper (1618-54) was a physician and herbalist during the reign of Elizabeth I, whose practice in East London was famous for treating the poor for no charge. His masterwork, The English Physician (known as Culpeper's Herbal) was published posthumously. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I now own two copies of this book, one nearly falling apart with frequent use and the other on the bookshelf. It is quite simply an excellent reference book for a working herbalist (which I am), especially one who studies and uses renaisance astrology too (which I do). For anyone who's not a herbalist and an astrologer(!) this book is still excellent - for the skeptic it's an often-amusing and enthralling look at the misguided medicine of the past, whilst for the historian, gardener, artist or modern-day user of medicinal plants it has much to offer. I love this edition as it hasn't been bastardised with unnecessary illustrations or stupidly edited to make it more 'readable', and it simply reproduces the original text. The order of subjects and herbs is a little jumbled and eccentric, but the information is all there, laid out quite logically once you get used to Culpeper's acerbic and occasionally tangential writing style. Besides, what would you expect from a 16th century maverick astrologer-apothecary, if not a little idiosyncratic editing? In fact Culpeper goes out of his way to provide extra information on how to prepare medicines, basic diagnostic techniques of his era, and other arcane joys. This book truly is a great pleasure, and should be read by, well, everybody with any interest in the history and practice of medicine.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am an herbalist. a university trained anthropologist/archaeologist. That being said, I work with herbs, herbal supplements & historical/scientific writings dealing with herbs. I was given a copy of this Herbal in December 2000. It is a difficult book to read. The vernacular is the same as when initially written. Prior to full comprehension of each herb, formulae or idea; almost all the entries need to be translated from the colloquial of 1653. One can lose the original intent simply by attempting to update the wording. There is no table of contents & unless you are diligent; the descriptions of herbs lead into a section denoting several uses & formulations of herbs, portions of plants & idiomatic medical terminology; which is confusing at best. Again the vocabulary/glossary is difficult because the publishers have given no guidance. There comes a section in the book which speaks of either "the college" or "culpepper's" view on herbs & their uses. It is almost as if several works of the author have been put into the same book; without any weaving of the materials together -other than their common denominator being the author. However- the uses of Latin based pharmacological nomen & the more common lay names of the herbs, formulations & "remedies" has broadened my knowledge further & entices me to read more. This is not a light reading category book. This book needs a serious classical reader or someone who has the patience to read Old English medical treatises. As a reference; it will become a part of my formulary's bibliography.
Comment 83 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is largely for historians wishing to know about how herbs used to be used although it still can be used to day. There were no illlustrations, although the book does have an index of some herbs and diseases, which is useful. The book also states the astrological and zodiac uses of each of the herbs and they can be used for and descriptions of the herbs.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Absolutely fascinating. I am 73 years old and have just started taking an interest in nature that abounds around us. When walking the dogs I now take a keen interest in the plants and trees around me. Elderberry is fantastic. It makes me want to turn back time so I can take herbal medicine up seriously.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Nicholas Culpeper was born in Surrey, England on 18 October 1616. His father, also named Nicholas Culpeper (1581-1616), who studied at Queens' College, Cambridge, was a clergyman. Culpeper Junior - who was raised by his widowed mother and her father - lived in Cambridge in 1634 and studied for the University but there's no record of him graduating. He became an apprentice apothecary in London and later set up as an astrologer physician. His book "English Physician: or an Astrologo-Physical Discourse of the Vulgar Herbs of this Nation" was published in 1652. He was scorned by the medical profession of his time, who were themselves corrupt and arrogant, protecting their own practices by operating a monopoly and keeping knowledge to themselves whilst changing fees that were beyond the means of poor people; apothecaries were the only source of medical help the poor could afford. The books informed common people on where and how to help themselves - a radical move in the 17th century, which attracted scorn and derision from the College of Physicians in London.

According to Mary Rhinelander McCarl there are two works currently in print:
1. "Culpeper's Complete Herbal: A Book of Natural Remedies for Ancient Ills". This is a reprint of the 1653 "English Physician Enlarged", which is Culpeper's translation of the College of Physicians 1618 "Pharmacopoeia Londinensis" together with selections from his 1655 "Last Legacy". The plants are arranged alphabetically from "Amara Culcis" to "Yarrow".
2. "Culpeper's Complete Herbal: Consisting of a Comprehensive Description of Nearly All Herbs" which is a photo-reproduction of an unknown nineteenth-century edition of the "Culpeper's Complete Herbal" that does not depend on Culpeper's original book.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback