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An audit of Marquette University School of Dentistry

4.0 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 5 pages
  • Publisher: State of Wisconsin, Legislative Audit Bureau (1988)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00071AA98
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Had this novella been longer than a hundred and fifty pages, I doubt if I would have persevered to the end.
My misgivings about it are
i it was a short story expanded into a novella. It carried excess baggage. There are two sections set in Paris. Why? They added nothing. Much of the book I thought just overwritten, as if Ms Moore was trying to get as many ideas into a sentence as she could. Few byways were left unexplored. Overload. Overload. I found myself skimming pages. In a story of 150 pages!
ii OK, so I'm male, not American, and my teenage years are way behind me, so I may be way outside the book's target audience, but this just did not convince as a coming-of-age story.
iii I was indifferent as to the fate of the narrator, in fact of all the characters except, just a little of Sil's. Ms Moore didn't make them live for me.
iv the narrative lacked tension, nothing developed, there were no climaxes.
Near the end, there were several pages of beautiful, uncluttered prose. Too little, too late.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book as the monthly choice in my book group otherwise I would probably have abandoned it half way through.
All I can say is, ignore the gushing reviews on the cover about it's comedic qualities. I don't think I managed more than a smile.
I found it, on the whole although well written with interesting characters,a deeply depressing and gloomy book, full of failed ambition and mini tragedy.
Several hours of my life I won't get back, though it's major redeeming feature is that it's mercifully brief
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think this book explores a married woman's psychological response to not having kids.

Her husband is coping through work. Berie, on the other hand, is hoping to make sense of her present by better understanding her past.

In particular Berie recollects her intense adolescent friendship with Sils, the girl whom she helped have an abortion when they were both fifteen.

Berie stole money to pay for the abortion, and when Berie's parents found out, they sent her away to boarding school in disgrace.

The juxta-position of an abortion with later childlessness is a riskily simplistic proposition, even though it was not Berie herself who had the abortion. It is such a loaded subject both emotionally and politically, especially in America. But Moore presents the juxta-position as a crisis of identity for one woman, rather than as a political issue.

Berie has a problem reconciling her teenage self, who facilitated an abortion out of deep love for her friend, with her present self, who hopes for a baby with her husband, even though they are not in love. Her desires and direction-of-travel then and now are so at odds.

Put simply, how does any woman absorb the tension between the phase of life when pregnancy equals disaster and the phase of life when pregnancy is the goal? It is a U-turn... a threat to personal integrity. It can drive a wedge between our young and older selves.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I didn't really *get* this book, I'm afraid. From what I can decipher, this was based primarily on two teenage girls' friendship in the early 70's. Somehow the past reminiscing jumped to the present day in Paris with her husband - this link was lost on me.

I guess I enjoyed parts of this but for the most part it was too "arty" and "wordy". I certainly didn't find the author to be "one of the funniest writers of all time" as described on the front cover. There was no humour here and certainly no definitive plot either.
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By Four Violets TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 April 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the "realest" books I've read for a long time. Much has been written about how our sense of expectancy and potential as teenagers so often fizzles out into mediocrity, and how friendships made at that time are more intense than any in later life. But Lorrie Moore has described it brilliantly well, in her story of the close friendship between two teenage girls Berie and Sils. Of Sils: "She could never become boring. If she lived where I lived then, at the moment, that was enough."

The frog hospital was a sad attempt to heal creatures wilfully hurt by boys; and the males in the book are generally ineffectual, damaging or absent. At best perhaps, irrelevant. The book is very funny, but at the same time it's sharp. In fact it cuts like a knife.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Absolutely fabulous, beautifully written and an absolute delight to read. I came across it in a charity shop and bought it on a whim and I couldn't be more pleased I did. One of my all-time favourites and I will read it again and again. I can honestly say I didn't want it to end.
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Format: Paperback
I haven't read this book for a few years, but it's always remained one of my favourites. brilliantly written, sad and funny, I would recommend this to anyone - but mainly women probably! It's a great book to keep and go back to after a year or two - the story is just as good the second time round, as it's the lovely and vivid style of writing, rather than any major twists or suprises, that make this such a good book. I love it. In fact, after writing this, I might read it again!
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