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  • 13
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Answer:
The Wifi extender (i.e. the bit that increases the range of your home wifi) is plugged into a normal 13 amp socket in the room where you want the better wifi signal. This component communicates over your internal 250v wiring with the base hub which should be plugged into a 13 amp socket near to your Broadband router. T… see more The Wifi extender (i.e. the bit that increases the range of your home wifi) is plugged into a normal 13 amp socket in the room where you want the better wifi signal. This component communicates over your internal 250v wiring with the base hub which should be plugged into a 13 amp socket near to your Broadband router. This hub connects to the Broadband router using an ethernet cable. The good thing about this device is that you can "clone" the wifi name to the extender (it tells you how in the instructions) so that you get a single Wifi network across your home. Mine was simple to set up and works fine. see less
By Mike on 30 January 2014
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Sort answer: YES. Well, it should, depending on your router and settings.
Long answer:
It works through any number of walls and across different circuits, even across circuits with Residual Current Breaker with Overcurrent (or RCBO - that stupidly sensible fuse like circuit breaker that modern houses have; a more fanc… see more
Sort answer: YES. Well, it should, depending on your router and settings.
Long answer:
It works through any number of walls and across different circuits, even across circuits with Residual Current Breaker with Overcurrent (or RCBO - that stupidly sensible fuse like circuit breaker that modern houses have; a more fancy version of RCDs). And it works with all modern devices which need access to internet, except sometimes not for chromecast as one reviewer pointed out (I wonder why?)! But if you want to give it a go...
You don't need to worry about cloning: it won't work or it will make matters worse, because your old wi-fi might not reach to that part of the house enough to be cloned (but by all means, give it a go). Just unwrap the box (gently in case you need to return it!) and plug in the smaller unit next to your router and the bigger unit next to your chromecast. Plug the white ethernet cable (like a more fancy telephone wire) in your first unit, then plug it in your router. Your router should have at least one spare little space for this cable. Don't worry, it only plugs in one way, you can't fault it.
Don't need the CD or any instructions unless you really like reading boring stuff (was helpful to me initially nevertheless).
Why it works?
The poweline kit consists of one unit which is plugged in next to your internet router and another unit (the wi-fi extender) plugged in where you need internet but you don't have at the moment. The first unit is attached with an ethernet cable to your router and from there it sends networking traffic through the same wires which supply your electricity to the other unit.
It works just like, if I may make a very loose analogy, our hearing works when listening to a person in a room with other people talking: we can hear what we choose despite the fact that the air (the medium) is filled up with lots of other bits of information (other people voices, background music, even radio waves to which we are not sensible). To the powerline kit the wires in your wall are just another type of medium which is cleverly used to transmit information.
Because all your power sockets in your house come from a single source, at your fuse-board, at the electricity meter, they are all essentially connected. It makes no difference how many walls you have, and how thick they are, between your sender and your receiver as the signal is transmitted through the wires, through the walls.
So, the wi-fi extender is receiving the internet from the power socket it is plugged in, alongside power to keep it on. Really clever.
Because the wi-fi extender plugs in next to your TV presumably and next to your google chromecast, which is plugged in your tv, these two units are very close to each-other. Consequently, your chromecast will be "bathed" in a lovely nice strong wi-fi signal. You will now have full wi-fi signal in a part of your house where you had nothing at all before, and this can be used nicely by your google chromecast, alongside your other devices (laptops, tablets, phones etc.).
But, and this is a big BUT, if it doesn't work straight away:
Ensure you have the latest firmware update for your router on the manufacturer's website.
Chromecast only works with 2.4 GHz networks. For dual band routers, ensure you are connecting to the 2.4 GHz network for Chromecast and use separate names for the 2.4GHz and 5Ghz network.
If you want to use a hidden Wi-Fi network, select Other in the drop down for network selection during setup and enter your network's name and password.
If you have a router with MAC address filtering, add the MAC address of your Chromecast to the list of filtered devices. The MAC address of your Chromecast is listed at the bottom of the Chromecast setup app.
Disable Access Point/Client isolation on your router..
Disable IGMP Proxy on your router.
Disable any Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) or proxy servers, on your router and/or computer.
Disable auto channel selection on the 2.4 GHz band on your router and assign a fixed channel (1, 6, or 11).
Enable UPnP/Multicast on your router.
Enable IGMP on your router
...
Or just get something else rather than chromecast!
Let us know how it goes! :) see less

By Madalina E. Tudoran on 03 April 2015
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Yes, you just plug it in. I have a Suresignal too. Suresignals are notorious for bringing down your wifi. I think it introduces a lot of "noise" in to your mains ring and you can't control its broadcast channel, so I leave it out frequently.
By JonnyD75 on 18 February 2015
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Not experienced any drop outs myself since installing
By AJ on 14 January 2015
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That's depend. If you use the same electrical circuit then you can plug it anywhere next to where you want a good signal. My house is a large 6 bedrooms with 3 reception rooms, all separated by brick walls. The WiFi signal strength is now almost covering every corner of the house, with signal bars nearly show a full ca… see more That's depend. If you use the same electrical circuit then you can plug it anywhere next to where you want a good signal. My house is a large 6 bedrooms with 3 reception rooms, all separated by brick walls. The WiFi signal strength is now almost covering every corner of the house, with signal bars nearly show a full capacity, but occasionally dropping by one bar. You need to set them right though! read my review and some other reviews how to set them correctly. see less
By Wafir on 27 January 2016
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2.4GHz only.
By R W. on 26 November 2014
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No just buy one kit plus another two units and yes that will work in 4 rooms. you only need 1 adaptor which is attached by ethernet to your router. The other just plug into a standard socket. When you choose the kit it wil come up with suggestions to buy extras!
By Mrs Julie Abbott on 06 March 2015
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The TP-Link devices work off the house power supply and so will not work for different properties.
By Ellis Lynas on 03 March 2015