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Answer:
Rooter only went slow down here, I think the most I had from it was about 2mhz I get a myself a Hawaii and I can about 14mhz with that one on 4g. Sorry I can't help any more.
By Shane the Brain on 16 November 2014
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Yes. I use my as a standalone network to allow my Android tablet to talk to my Raspberry Pi.
By Paul Matley on 21 March 2016
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I'm sorry but I have no experience that could answer your question.
By timrandall on 20 January 2015
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Sorry, I don't have access to the manual to answer your question. Additionally, when we've used it, it's been in an area with no 4G signal so the issue hasn't arisen.
By timrandall on 12 June 2015
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No.
By Amazon Customer on 05 November 2014
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Yes I used mine on holiday in Turkey so Europe should not be a problem.
By B. J. du Cille on 31 March 2016
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That's an interesting question. The way the router is configured out of the box is to use the Ethernet port as what they describe as a LAN connection. In other words, you connect your computer to the router using an Ethernet cable rather than WiFi.
However, on reading the manual I found that you can change the configur… see more
That's an interesting question. The way the router is configured out of the box is to use the Ethernet port as what they describe as a LAN connection. In other words, you connect your computer to the router using an Ethernet cable rather than WiFi.
However, on reading the manual I found that you can change the configuration of the Ethernet port to WAN which allows it to be connected to something like an ADSL modem. It even has an 'auto' mode which allows it to use the Ethernet WAN port and then automatically switch to 3G if the WAN connection goes down.
So I think the answer is yes but you will have to reconfigure the router in order for it to work.
If you are just trying to use the router as a wireless access point then I think that will probably work with the default settings (although I haven't tried it) see less
That's an interesting question. The way the router is configured out of the box is to use the Ethernet port as what they describe as a LAN connection. In other words, you connect your computer to the router using an Ethernet cable rather than WiFi.
However, on reading the manual I found that you can change the configuration of the Ethernet port to WAN which allows it to be connected to something like an ADSL modem. It even has an 'auto' mode which allows it to use the Ethernet WAN port and then automatically switch to 3G if the WAN connection goes down.
So I think the answer is yes but you will have to reconfigure the router in order for it to work.
If you are just trying to use the router as a wireless access point then I think that will probably work with the default settings (although I haven't tried it)

By Mr. N. Edwards on 26 September 2014
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Your question seems to suggest that what you need is a WiFi repeater/range extender. This Zoom device creates a WiFi hotspot using your own source of mobile Internet. You need a USB modem (sometimes called a mobile broadband dongle), which you plug into the device and it creates a WiFi hotspot. You will be paying for t… see more Your question seems to suggest that what you need is a WiFi repeater/range extender. This Zoom device creates a WiFi hotspot using your own source of mobile Internet. You need a USB modem (sometimes called a mobile broadband dongle), which you plug into the device and it creates a WiFi hotspot. You will be paying for the Internet data used by the modem, just as you would by using your mobile phone to access the Internet. see less Your question seems to suggest that what you need is a WiFi repeater/range extender. This Zoom device creates a WiFi hotspot using your own source of mobile Internet. You need a USB modem (sometimes called a mobile broadband dongle), which you plug into the device and it creates a WiFi hotspot. You will be paying for the Internet data used by the modem, just as you would by using your mobile phone to access the Internet.
By timrandall on 30 April 2016
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Not in a true sense. It is a wi-fi router.
It will
a) convert a wired Ethernet internet connection into a wireless signal, or … see more
Not in a true sense. It is a wi-fi router.
It will
a) convert a wired Ethernet internet connection into a wireless signal, or
b) make the internet connection of a "cellular data USB dongle" available to multiple devices over wifi (rather than one device through USB).
It won't boost a mobile phone signal per se. It doesn't work on mobile phone bands on its own.
What it can do that might "sort of help" is if there is
1) Ethernet internet, or
2) cellular data signal in one spot (say in the window of a hotel room but not the rest of a room). With a USB dongle changing that signal into "a data connection" the router will then create a wireless hotspot for devices to access any data allowance (and if your cellular provider allows calls over wi-fi with your cell phone either
i) natively (like T-mobile in the USA) or
ii) over app (like O2 with the "TuGo" app in the U.K.):
Then and only then does it solve mobile phone signal issues! see less
Not in a true sense. It is a wi-fi router.
It will
a) convert a wired Ethernet internet connection into a wireless signal, or
b) make the internet connection of a "cellular data USB dongle" available to multiple devices over wifi (rather than one device through USB).
It won't boost a mobile phone signal per se. It doesn't work on mobile phone bands on its own.
What it can do that might "sort of help" is if there is
1) Ethernet internet, or
2) cellular data signal in one spot (say in the window of a hotel room but not the rest of a room). With a USB dongle changing that signal into "a data connection" the router will then create a wireless hotspot for devices to access any data allowance (and if your cellular provider allows calls over wi-fi with your cell phone either
i) natively (like T-mobile in the USA) or
ii) over app (like O2 with the "TuGo" app in the U.K.):
Then and only then does it solve mobile phone signal issues!

By BazzaS on 03 November 2016
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Yes there is.
By howdo? on 02 May 2015