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  • 8
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Answer:
Aperture (mm) 70 mm (2.76 in)
Focal Length 400 mm (16 in)
Focal Ratio 5.71

By Giuseppe on 16 April 2014
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I can confirm the images are the right way up. It looks the part for a 9yr old. It got my 12yr old son very seriously into astronomy. Hes doing his GCSE this year a year early partly due to this scope. Images if the moon next to my review were taken with this.
By Geoff on 29 November 2015
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I believe it needs a t adaptor available from Celestron - fits straight into the tube
By Mikedc on 18 September 2016
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Yes, quite good for bird watching(as I'm using it) and star gazing(for beginners). Regards.
By M. Canetti on 23 March 2015
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yes
By terry honeywill on 18 November 2015
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Sorry for delay as in hospital - the difference is the extra lenses - they can be bought separately but are expensive - the basic comes with 2 lenses and I had a lot of lenses already BUT if looking for a starter set for someone who may progress to a bigger telescope, no point in getting a lot of lenses to begin with b… see more Sorry for delay as in hospital - the difference is the extra lenses - they can be bought separately but are expensive - the basic comes with 2 lenses and I had a lot of lenses already BUT if looking for a starter set for someone who may progress to a bigger telescope, no point in getting a lot of lenses to begin with because you end up duplicating when you then get the larger Celestons and may need the space in the travel bag for star maps, laser light, torch etc see less Sorry for delay as in hospital - the difference is the extra lenses - they can be bought separately but are expensive - the basic comes with 2 lenses and I had a lot of lenses already BUT if looking for a starter set for someone who may progress to a bigger telescope, no point in getting a lot of lenses to begin with because you end up duplicating when you then get the larger Celestons and may need the space in the travel bag for star maps, laser light, torch etc
By Tony Ranzetta on 10 October 2016
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Apologise for late response. I can confirm that the 4mm eyepiece does not have a soft rubber cup. This should not effect useability in any way. That is by viewing with just a very slight distance between eyepiece and eye and focussing untill you feel comfortable with your view. Personally the reason why I think this ey… see more Apologise for late response. I can confirm that the 4mm eyepiece does not have a soft rubber cup. This should not effect useability in any way. That is by viewing with just a very slight distance between eyepiece and eye and focussing untill you feel comfortable with your view. Personally the reason why I think this eyepiece does not come with a rubber cup is because the lens is so small and possibly cause discomfort when viewing. Hope this helps your query. Dennis. see less Apologise for late response. I can confirm that the 4mm eyepiece does not have a soft rubber cup. This should not effect useability in any way. That is by viewing with just a very slight distance between eyepiece and eye and focussing untill you feel comfortable with your view. Personally the reason why I think this eyepiece does not come with a rubber cup is because the lens is so small and possibly cause discomfort when viewing. Hope this helps your query. Dennis.
By Mr. D. Tate on 09 November 2014
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Lots of questions, so I,ll do my best.
Firstly we recommend upgrading to a sturdier tripod. You will see lots of comments about the lightweight tripod. As the saying goes, the clue is in the title. Its a Travelscope, so needs to be portable. If it came with a heavy tripod it would not be a travelscope.
Yes its fine o… see more
Lots of questions, so I,ll do my best.
Firstly we recommend upgrading to a sturdier tripod. You will see lots of comments about the lightweight tripod. As the saying goes, the clue is in the title. Its a Travelscope, so needs to be portable. If it came with a heavy tripod it would not be a travelscope.
Yes its fine on the Moon. Use the 10mm eyepiece for this.
For Planets, it is not a long focal length so is not suitable. But with the 10mm eyepiece you will see the Moons around Jupiter.
As for stars, this depends on where you live. Best if you can get away from towns and cities to get to clear skies. So if you have dark skies, use the 20mm eyepiece that will give you nice views of the stars with better colours. You will see the brighter star clusters easily. The brighter galaxies and nebula will show as faint patches of light
Do not be tempted to use the 4mm and barlow straight away. This is a common mistake people do. These require accurate focus and perfect conditions. The 20mm and 10mm eyepieces are more sensible for wide field views with more realistist magnification
As I use one on a regular basis and sold many, I could go on. But the above is a general outline see less
Lots of questions, so I,ll do my best.
Firstly we recommend upgrading to a sturdier tripod. You will see lots of comments about the lightweight tripod. As the saying goes, the clue is in the title. Its a Travelscope, so needs to be portable. If it came with a heavy tripod it would not be a travelscope.
Yes its fine on the Moon. Use the 10mm eyepiece for this.
For Planets, it is not a long focal length so is not suitable. But with the 10mm eyepiece you will see the Moons around Jupiter.
As for stars, this depends on where you live. Best if you can get away from towns and cities to get to clear skies. So if you have dark skies, use the 20mm eyepiece that will give you nice views of the stars with better colours. You will see the brighter star clusters easily. The brighter galaxies and nebula will show as faint patches of light
Do not be tempted to use the 4mm and barlow straight away. This is a common mistake people do. These require accurate focus and perfect conditions. The 20mm and 10mm eyepieces are more sensible for wide field views with more realistist magnification
As I use one on a regular basis and sold many, I could go on. But the above is a general outline

By lincolnshire-optics SELLER on 27 November 2016
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yes think it would ideal
By andrew cusick on 27 June 2015