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Showing 1-10 of 20 questions
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I keep the bricks inside in my utility room on a shelf after they have dried. Alternatively, you could stack them in a plastic storage box with a lid on to prevent them from absorbing moisture. This might help if you can only store them outside. If they do get damp, I place the paper logs near the fire the night before… see more I keep the bricks inside in my utility room on a shelf after they have dried. Alternatively, you could stack them in a plastic storage box with a lid on to prevent them from absorbing moisture. This might help if you can only store them outside. If they do get damp, I place the paper logs near the fire the night before l use them to help dry them out. see less I keep the bricks inside in my utility room on a shelf after they have dried. Alternatively, you could stack them in a plastic storage box with a lid on to prevent them from absorbing moisture. This might help if you can only store them outside. If they do get damp, I place the paper logs near the fire the night before l use them to help dry them out.
Tim Wilson
· 10 April 2014
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The device requires the raw material to be thoroughly wetted and be capable of significant compression to for the briquette- the scissor action is limited by how much force you can physically apply and if you apply too much pressure the metal outer frame begins to distort allowing material to squeeze past the sides. I… see more The device requires the raw material to be thoroughly wetted and be capable of significant compression to for the briquette- the scissor action is limited by how much force you can physically apply and if you apply too much pressure the metal outer frame begins to distort allowing material to squeeze past the sides. I’m not sure your paper based cat litter would be capable of being compressed enough. see less The device requires the raw material to be thoroughly wetted and be capable of significant compression to for the briquette- the scissor action is limited by how much force you can physically apply and if you apply too much pressure the metal outer frame begins to distort allowing material to squeeze past the sides. I’m not sure your paper based cat litter would be capable of being compressed enough.
A. M. Singleton
· 04 November 2018
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no I don't suggest to use it for this kind of paper
Pantelis Tountas
· 22 August 2015
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Yes! We use them to supplement heat logs and wood logs. They do produce a lot of ash though!
E S B
· 19 October 2018
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230 mm X 90 mm X 50mm, although you can vary the depth (50 mm) by adding more material
Neil H
· 20 February 2014
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Yes but suggest they are mixed with paper to give the log some structure.
Mike Thomas
· 08 January 2018
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Theoretically yes but they would need to be dry and mixed well with other ingredients. There is a thing called a coffee fire log which is made from coffee grounds, wax and molasses which you can check out on the web.
Mike Thomas
· 08 February 2018
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Mine came genuine might want to return picking people might of messed up
Dwaine
· 04 November 2018
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I don't see why not you are only squeezing the moisture out
Max
· 08 June 2018
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Newspaper pulp creates a solid block because of the fibres. Not sure if the wood, would hold together. It may just fall apart when it dries.
The only animal waste I have seen used as fuel is dried from cows or elephants (100% herbivores).
As the process means creating a wet product, any trace of faeces will have a lo… see more
Newspaper pulp creates a solid block because of the fibres. Not sure if the wood, would hold together. It may just fall apart when it dries.
The only animal waste I have seen used as fuel is dried from cows or elephants (100% herbivores).
As the process means creating a wet product, any trace of faeces will have a lovely environment for any bacteria to develop.
I know I wouldn't want that drying somewhere or to be handling it before burning. see less
Newspaper pulp creates a solid block because of the fibres. Not sure if the wood, would hold together. It may just fall apart when it dries.
The only animal waste I have seen used as fuel is dried from cows or elephants (100% herbivores).
As the process means creating a wet product, any trace of faeces will have a lovely environment for any bacteria to develop.
I know I wouldn't want that drying somewhere or to be handling it before burning.

MaskedPuffer
· 17 January 2016