Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop now Shop now Bohemian Rhapsody Bohemian Rhapsody Bohemian Rhapsody Learn more Shop Fire Shop Now Learn More Learn more

what is the best way to build a fire that maintains oven temperature when the flames die down?

asked on 01 June 2015

Showing 1-5 of 5 answers

Hi, we haven't tried charcoal yet but wood certainly doesn't seem to work. I think the main problem is the lack of insulation, there is nothing to keep the heat in. Sorry I can't be of more help
mrs S.
· 02 June 2015
Leave a Comment
| Do you find this helpful?
| Report abuse

simple reply it is near impossible, i welded extra bars to the fire bars then flat plate as wood fire needs an ash base to keep the fire hot , as it is all the ash drops in to the pan and fire dies, i did use BBQ charcoal but you need it to be hot or the smoke will got in the pizza. I gave up using it and put it down as a mistake, would love to see the company the makes them come and do a demo to prove they work. you will be disappointed but that is just my experience
Simon Edge
· 02 June 2015
Leave a Comment
| Do you find this helpful?
| Report abuse

I agree with Michael's answer on the whole but to be honest I am considering using the oven as a mould to build brickwork over it to get e real Pizza oven effect and to keep heat in.
Lorraine Bould
· 02 June 2015
Leave a Comment
| Do you find this helpful?
| Report abuse

My husband informs me that the best thing to use is briquettes (similar to charcoal), as they form a bed of embers, adding small pieces of hardwood if required. Hope this helps!
frayed at the edge
· 02 June 2015
Leave a Comment
| Do you find this helpful?
| Report abuse

It took a while to sort out, but I always maintain a small fire below the pizza stone. I use small bits of kindling (usually untreated pine from pallets, approx 0.5"x1"x8" each. Once I have the fire going, put the stone in to heat up for 10-15 mins, and once you have it at about 250C put the pizza in, adding a piece or… see more It took a while to sort out, but I always maintain a small fire below the pizza stone. I use small bits of kindling (usually untreated pine from pallets, approx 0.5"x1"x8" each. Once I have the fire going, put the stone in to heat up for 10-15 mins, and once you have it at about 250C put the pizza in, adding a piece or two of kindling at a time to maintain a steady but low flame. Leave until the bottom starts to brown then remove using a pizza paddle usually this takes about 6-8 minutes max. I tried using charcoal for no flames, but could never get the temp to stay up and finally found that this works. Done it a few times now and have got it down to a tee - cooked 7 x 10 inch pizzas one after the other using this kit. As long as you use decent quality untreated wood and keep the front door open slightly while cooking you will get enough air flow to maintain the fire but give the pizza true smokiness to it. It really is an awesome pizza oven, but does take a few attempts to get the results ! Hope this helps. see less It took a while to sort out, but I always maintain a small fire below the pizza stone. I use small bits of kindling (usually untreated pine from pallets, approx 0.5"x1"x8" each. Once I have the fire going, put the stone in to heat up for 10-15 mins, and once you have it at about 250C put the pizza in, adding a piece or two of kindling at a time to maintain a steady but low flame. Leave until the bottom starts to brown then remove using a pizza paddle usually this takes about 6-8 minutes max. I tried using charcoal for no flames, but could never get the temp to stay up and finally found that this works. Done it a few times now and have got it down to a tee - cooked 7 x 10 inch pizzas one after the other using this kit. As long as you use decent quality untreated wood and keep the front door open slightly while cooking you will get enough air flow to maintain the fire but give the pizza true smokiness to it. It really is an awesome pizza oven, but does take a few attempts to get the results ! Hope this helps.
Michael Betham
· 01 June 2015
Leave a Comment
| Do you find this helpful?
| Report abuse
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next