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around the world in a day LP

4.6 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: PAISLEY PARK
  • ASIN: B003YWFINK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Format: Audio CD
Prince's 'Around The World In A Day' is the quite baffling yet brilliant follow-up to his 1984 phenomenom 'Purple Rain'.
Psychadelic with a capital P and lacking the raunchy guitar riffs all too common on previous Prince tracks such as 'Computer Blue', the album wasn't as warmly embraced as its predecessor.
Critics and audiences were confused...they thought they were getting 'Purple Rain pt.2' and what they got instead was this album; a kaleidoscope of distinct melodies, colourful imagery, and more importantly pure-purple genius.
Prince himself said that it would be all too easy to open the album with the same kind of fiery guitar solo that concluded 'Let's Go Crazy'...but he doesn't like being predictable, and throughout the duration of this album, he is anything but.
The title cut kicks off the album perfectly, with an ear-piercing whine from Prince followed by an awash of soaring keyboards and foreign instrumentation...fans at the time didn't know what they were hearing, was this the same man who told us just months ago that he met a girl in a hotel lobby...well you know the rest.
'Paisley Park' was probably more like it for the fans...an incredibly catchy trippy-pop song containing, amongst other things, a very contagious chorus... the song still remains one of Prince's strongest pure pop tracks ever.
'Raspberry Beret' and 'Pop Life' are the two standout songs on the album and were, rightfully, big hits, but that 'Prince-masterpiece' you look for on every album comes in the form of track 3: 'Condition Of The Heart', a wonderful and touching ballad that, musically, is Prince's finest from the 80's.
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Format: Audio CD
The 80s wouldn't have been the 80s without Prince. Around the World in a Day was his follow-up album to the immensely popular Purple Rain. While this album is certainly not as momentous as its predecessor, it most certainly does have its good points. First of all, and I think this was a wise decision on Prince's part, Around the World in a Day has a different feel and sound to it than Purple Rain, a new mood which the cover of the album ably reflects. There are psychedelic touches to this music, as well as a plethora of Indian and perhaps oriental sounds, that give the album a somewhat upbeat, rather mystical atmosphere. The opening track Around the World in a Day sets the record straight from the very beginning, giving ample warning that this album is not going to be a Purple Rain knockoff by an artist content to coast his way down from the top of the mountain of superstardom. Raspberry Beret was naturally a huge hit, and it has something of a light, energetic quality to it that makes it fun to listen to even now. Pop Life is another pop-oriented song that got ample play on the radio, and its airy yet serious style is quite in contrast to the song and released single America. America has a dose of serious guitar of a slightly heavy variety, making me think of (yet not actually reminding me of) Jimi Hendrix, except Jimi never screamed the way Prince does on this track. Paisley Park is a wonderful song, boasting some of Prince's best and most emotionally touching lyrics. It is followed by the equally impressive yet very different song Condition of the Heart; this love song starts with some impressive tickling of the ivories before eventually leading into Prince's high-key and perfectly mournful lyrics. The final two tracks offer another contrast in styles.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
A lot of bandwagon "fans" of Prince's sixth album "Purple Rain" immediately jumped ship on hearing this. Maybe commercially speaking he should have waited longer for the Purple Rain hype to die down but this was a different set of sounds and messages to that monumental classic and was never equipped to come close to it's predecessor's mainstream appeal.
Prince I am sure realised this himself, but being the artist he is, rushed it's release through, as always thriving on experimentation and spontaneity. I feel he was right to stay real to himself as although not a record label's dream follow up it is still an artistically rewarding work for the listener. While looking back now however we should understand the reaction at the time would be relative to different set of issues, not least "Purple Rain Mania". :)
This album was as mentioned above not very commercial in it's overall sound apart from two singles. "Raspeberry Beret" is a well known Prince standard and its summertime sway and wandering strings add to make a Beatle-esque Pop classic. "Pop Life" was a simple commentary on the music industry that Prince was now central to and he is harshly critical towards cocaine users within the lyrics. It is also a very accomplished song.
Other highlights include the Eastern influenced title track, another Beatles-psychadelic (The Beatles seem a big influence on this album right upto the cover art) type song speaking of a Utopia "Paisley Park" (The name of Prince's newly established label and recording studio at the time) and the tender ballad "Condition Of The Heart" which although beautiful never quite reaches it's awesome potential in my opinion.
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