Zvenigora - (Mr Bongo Fil... has been added to your Basket

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£9.98
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: jim-exselecky
Add to Basket
£9.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: TwoRedSevens
Add to Basket
£10.18
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Zvenigora - (Mr Bongo Films) (1928) [DVD]

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

Price: £6.75 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by Home Entertainment Online and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
18 new from £5.50

LOVEFiLM By Post

Rent Zvenigora on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£6.75 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by Home Entertainment Online and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Zvenigora - (Mr Bongo Films) (1928) [DVD]
  • +
  • Arsenal [DVD] [2028] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Total price: £109.66
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Directors: Alexander Dovzhenko
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Russian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Mr Bongo Films
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Feb. 2011
  • Run Time: 91 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004CZ6I0A
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 117,859 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

For centuries invaders have coveted the treasures of Ukraine. And for centuries they have been guarded by Grandfather (Nikolai Nademsky - Earth). This mysterious treasure remains hidden at Mount Zvenigora eluding the often violent search conducted by Poles, Cossacks and Germans in the course of centuries. In the turbulent years of the twentieth century, the treasure is sought by his descendants in the hope of recovering a past in danger of being lost. A 'cinematographic poem', Zvenigora moves from past to present, combining reality with fantasy. It conveys the spirit of Ukrainian history, its transition from a rural, agricultural society to the modern world of industrialization and its discontents.

Zvenigora was immediately recognized as a masterpiece by Sergei Eisenstein and V. I. Pudovkin. The most sensual and poetic of Soviet masters, Alexander Dovzhenko's unconventional vision and experimental style remained rooted in his love for his native Ukraine; its culture and its people. Zvenigora, his first major film, is his most joyous work.

Review

This is intellectually Marxist, and yet montage is an incredibly exciting form of filmmaking. Now used by advertisers and Hollywood blockbusters, in the hands of Soviet filmmakers it was a revolutionary cinematic experience --Socialist Review

As the lights went on, we felt that we had just witnessed a memorable event in the development of cinema --Sergei Eisenstein

As the lights went on, we felt that we had just witnessed a memorable event in the development of cinema --Sergei Eisenstein

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Looking at the two reviews here, Id like to strike a balance. I'd just bought the recently issued 3 film boxed set of Dovzhenko's War Trilogy, of which, this is the start. I bought the set as it was an absolute bargain, making it little more than the fairly well-known 'Earth' that I'd heard about and wanted to see.

Firstly, I took 'cinematic poetry' to be just that, images and scenes that evoked a story rather than simply reciting it in the usual way. Thus heavy symbolism plays a huge part and I have to disagree with Bob Salter that one has to know the subject to appreciate it. I use that word, 'appreciate' rather than 'understand' and it is the very nature of the genre here, known as 'avant-garde' that further takes into realms of fantasy, or, pretentious waffle, if that's how you take it.

Avant-garde is not my favourite genre either but when you consider that this is still the Silent Era - normality would be having a fixed camera, on a studio set and the actors moving around in front of it, in all but the most expensive and adventurous productions. The Russians, at this point, as well some notable German film-makers were doing much more and experimenting with double exposures, cutting, fading, all-sorts, simply to extend both the boundaries of their imagination and cinematic technology.

Of course, film has moved on an awfully long way and so has people's entertainment. These moving images are both historical; a recreated scenario now wouldn't anywhere near the same authenticity - and human. As in stills photography of those days, it is capturing people and their lives that would have seemed so special and fascinating, marrying that up with story-telling would take longer as both film-makers and the public got used to this exciting, new medium.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
An incredibly old film restored in the 1970's which is portraying (silently) a small part of the Ukrainian struggles. Understand this and the others in the trilogy (Arsenal and Earth) and you'll start to understand the issues facing the country today, there are incredibly strongly rooted in history and culture.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Zvenigora is a mountain in Ukrainian that holds a secret. Buried somewhere in it, is an ancient Scythian treasure that has been searched for for nearly as long as it was buried. For some insight into the name, "gora" is the Polish word for mountain (although it isn't in Ukrainian), so the name could be considered "Zveni-mountain." Considering Zvenigora is this hill/mountain, the possible connection is hard to dismiss.

The film begins in the 17th century with a large group of Ukrainians searching for Poles who are trying to find the treasures in the earth of Zvenigora. They meet an old man from the area who agrees to help them save the treasure. The old man is a central figure to the film as he is always there, at every point in time. From the present time (1928) to prehistory when Scythians lived on Ukrainian soil, the old man witnesses all of the events that happen. In the present time, the old man teaches his grandson about the legend and passes on the tradition of their history.

Albeit a Russian film, Zvenigora is all about Ukrainian history. Zvenigora is also considered the first part in Alexander Dovzhenko's Ukrainian trilogy. It shares in common with the other parts not only the fact that it presents Ukrainian history, but also takes on a lot of issues for a silent film. The stories are not completely simple and leave us having to connect some of the details. They also all show us the wars Ukraine endured in the early part of the 20th century. Zvenigora differs from the other parts in that it shows more of the Ukrainian lore and legends than the other parts. Dovzhenko's films are different than modern cinema and resemble visual poetry.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 April 2011
Format: DVD
"Zvenigora" is considered a silent revolutionary epic. It forms the first part of Alexander Dovzhenko's Ukranian trilogy. The second part was "Arsenal" and the third "Earth". I have to be totally honest here and admit that I really struggled to understand this film. So much so that I really don't have a clue as to whether I have just watched a classic or a load of pretentious nonsense. The film explores Ukranian history through the search for an ancient buried treasure in the mountain of Zvenigora. An old man who appears throughout the film is central to the story. The word story is perhaps not the right word, as it is more a surrealist look at Ukranian myths, legends and current politics as they were in 1928 when this film was made.

I should set the record right straight away by saying that this is not an Indiana Jones style treasure hunt, with fun filled action galore. If you want a chilled out popcorn munching movie, then I should forget it! This is one where you really need to have done your homework to fully appreciate whats on offer, which I didn't I hasten to add! You need to know something about Ukranian history including the Bolshevik uprising and Dovzhenko's aims. Much of the imagery is undeniably striking and densely symbol laden. The scene where a soldier approaches three Germans in the First World War typifies that best. It is as visually striking as many paintings. The film has been compared to Picasso's 'Guernica' which I can quite understand. There is a strange scene between a fat General and the old man who is digging for the treasure, that reminded me much of the work by the surreal film maker Alejandro Jodorowsky. For someone who is interested in a highly original exploration into one country's political history, then this may fascinate them.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the first part in Alexander Dovzhenko's Ukrainian trilogy 28 Feb. 2011
By Richard Brzostek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Zvenigora is a mountain in Ukrainian that holds a secret. Buried somewhere in it, is an ancient Scythian treasure that has been searched for for nearly as long as it was buried. For some insight into the name, "gora" is the Polish word for mountain (although it isn't in Ukrainian), so the name could be considered "Zveni-mountain." Considering Zvenigora is this hill/mountain, the possible connection is hard to dismiss.

The film begins in the 17th century with a large group of Ukrainians searching for Poles who are trying to find the treasures in the earth of Zvenigora. They meet an old man from the area who agrees to help them save the treasure. The old man is a central figure to the film as he is always there, at every point in time. From the present time (1928) to prehistory when Scythians lived on Ukrainian soil, the old man witnesses all of the events that happen. In the present time, the old man teaches his grandson about the legend and passes on the tradition of their history.

Albeit a Russian film, Zvenigora is all about Ukrainian history. Zvenigora is also considered the first part in Alexander Dovzhenko's Ukrainian trilogy. It shares in common with the other parts not only the fact that it presents Ukrainian history, but also takes on a lot of issues for a silent film. The stories are not completely simple and leave us having to connect some of the details. They also all show us the wars Ukraine endured in the early part of the 20th century. Zvenigora differs from the other parts in that it shows more of the Ukrainian lore and legends than the other parts. Dovzhenko's films are different than modern cinema and resemble visual poetry.
5.0 out of 5 stars If you like "Earth" or "Arsenal" or other films of that era ... 22 Nov. 2014
By Bernardo G. Cavaliere - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Wacky sureal soviet era film about an old man and his search for a legendary treasure in the Ukraine during the red revolution in Russia. If you like "Earth" or "Arsenal" or other films of that era you'll like this one. B+W or course and silent, with classical music added. Only problem is its PAL so if you are in the USA and need NTSC you will have to watch it on the computer ... but it was cheap so WTF ! LOL ! Enjoy another wacky attempt by red film makers to be profound !
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Save your money - Get the same thing for free on the Internet Archive 15 Mar. 2015
By A. Wallace - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
This is not a Criterion Collection release, kids. This is nothing more than putting a widely available copy of Zvenigora, available for free at the Internet Archive and on YouTube, onto a DVD and splitting it into equal chapters for viewing. There is no restoration, no explanation, the soundtrack is either ridiculous or inappropriate, and the film quality and translations from the Russian are both extremely poor. You shouldn't have to pay for this.

The film itself is mostly a boring hodge-podge of inscrutable episodes punctuated by items of historical or anthropological interest. There are a few interesting "special effects" scenes. I was bowled over watching this in the wake of some wildly overstated praise that I read on the Internet. Comparing this to anything by Eisenstein or Tarkovsky is absurd, let alone to the Western greats of silent cinema. The experience would be greatly enhanced by the following:

* An appropriate soundtrack
* Film restoration (if this is the great classic that some claim it is, someone needs to do a restoration)
* Better translations of titles from the Russian
* Additional materials such as interviews with film and history experts on the importance of the film and its themes

As someone interested in Slavic history, this was a big disappointment.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Customer Discussions


Look for similar items by category


Feedback