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Zuni Folk Tales Hardcover – 25 Jul 2007

5.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 25 Jul 2007
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 492 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Co (25 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0548090254
  • ISBN-13: 978-0548090251
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

Frank Hamilton Cushing (1857-1900) was a field collector for the Bureau of American Ethnology and head of the Hemenway Archaeological Expedition of 1886-88. He lived for five years as an honorary member of the Zu i people. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Format: Paperback
The introduction by J.W. Powell, Washington City, and November, 1901 is worth the price of the book alone. It sets the tone of what a Folk- tail is in this context and tells want Mr. Cushing is about to do. It also shows that some of the tails as with other collections are hybrids for native and Christian stories intertwined. Even those that are attributed to Gilgamesh were imported and corrupted.

The 33 tails collected from 1879 to 1884 are transcribed by Frank Hamilton Cushing a professional anthropologist who lived with the Zuñi pueblo people from 1879 to 1884. You may find these tales a bit more sophisticated than many of the other Indian folk tale collections.

The tales even though interesting and each with an ending moral will start to repeat a theme; each one has a poor schnook that is told not to do something or is tricked into doing something. That something is never explained to the schnook until it is too late. Some deal with the underworld, and many with talking animals.
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Format: Paperback
The introduction by J.W. Powell, Washington City, and November, 1901 is worth the price of the book alone. It sets the tone of what a Folk- tail is in this context and tells want Mr. Cushing is about to do. It also shows that some of the tails as with other collections are hybrids for native and Christian stories intertwined. Even those that are attributed to Gilgamesh were imported and corrupted.

The 33 tails collected from 1879 to 1884 are transcribed by Frank Hamilton Cushing a professional anthropologist who lived with the Zuñi pueblo people from 1879 to 1884. You may find these tales a bit more sophisticated than many of the other Indian folk tale collections.

The tales even though interesting and each with an ending moral will start to repeat a theme; each one has a poor schnook that is told not to do something or is tricked into doing something. That something is never explained to the schnook until it is too late. Some deal with the underworld, and many with talking animals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The introduction by J.W. Powell, Washington City, and November, 1901 is worth the price of the book alone. It sets the tone of what a Folk- tail is in this context and tells want Mr. Cushing is about to do. It also shows that some of the tails as with other collections are hybrids for native and Christian stories intertwined. Even those that are attributed to Gilgamesh were imported and corrupted.

The 33 tails collected from 1879 to 1884 are transcribed by Frank Hamilton Cushing a professional anthropologist who lived with the Zuñi pueblo people from 1879 to 1884. You may find these tales a bit more sophisticated than many of the other Indian folk tale collections.

The tales even though interesting and each with an ending moral will start to repeat a theme; each one has a poor schnook that is told not to do something or is tricked into doing something. That something is never explained to the schnook until it is too late. Some deal with the underworld, and many with talking animals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The introduction by J.W. Powell, Washington City, and November, 1901 is worth the price of the book alone. It sets the tone of what a Folk- tail is in this context and tells want Mr. Cushing is about to do. It also shows that some of the tails as with other collections are hybrids for native and Christian stories intertwined. Even those that are attributed to Gilgamesh were imported and corrupted.

The 33 tails collected from 1879 to 1884 are transcribed by Frank Hamilton Cushing a professional anthropologist who lived with the Zuñi pueblo people from 1879 to 1884. You may find these tales a bit more sophisticated than many of the other Indian folk tale collections.

The tales even though interesting and each with an ending moral will start to repeat a theme; each one has a poor schnook that is told not to do something or is tricked into doing something. That something is never explained to the schnook until it is too late. Some deal with the underworld, and many with talking animals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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